Search


PDF Archive search engine
Last database update: 17 May at 11:24 - Around 76000 files indexed.


Show results per page

Results for «remission»:


Total: 50 results - 0.047 seconds

120216-Actavis-v-Lilly-dextrose-judgment-redacted 100%

Contents Topic Paragraphs Introduction The procedural context of the Dextrose Remission Issue in more detail The witnesses Factual witnesses Oncologists Endocrinologist Pharmacists Foreign law experts The law with respect to the Dextrose Remission Issue Indirect infringement Negative declaratory relief Factual background to the Dextrose Remission Issue A note on terminology Alimta and the Alimta SmPC Actavis’ application for marketing authorisations The Actavis Products and UK SmPC Proposed variation to the UK SmPC for the Actavis Product Proposed variations to the CP SmPC for the Actavis Product The German SmPC for the Actavis Product Administration of pemetrexed Dexamethasone Preparation of cytotoxic drugs for administration The use of saline and dextrose solution as diluents for chemotherapy drugs Stability data available to pharmacists Storage as aseptic preparations Published stability data for Alimta Actavis’ stability for the Actavis Product Supply and distribution of the Actavis Product Steps taken by Actavis to prevent the Actavis Product from being diluted in saline Steps taken by Actavis in relation to the availability of stability data of its product in saline Steps taken by Lilly to prevent the Actavis Product from being diluted in saline Diabetes Assessment of the Dextrose Remission Issue The role of the oncologist The role of the endocrinologist The evidence of the pharmacists The importance of the SmPC Is it likely that stability data for the Actavis Product in saline 1-6 7-12 12-26 12-13 14-15 16-17 18-23 24-26 27-34 27-32 33-34 35-92 35 36-39 40 41-45 46-51 52 53 54 55 56-60 61 62 63 64 65 67-69 70-77 78-81 82-83 84-91 92-172 94 95 96 97-99 100-109 MR JUSTICE ARNOLD Approved Judgment will become available?

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/08/10/120216-actavis-v-lilly-dextrose-judgment-redacted/

10/08/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

What a late God! 87%

'Then He said to them, "Thus it is written, and thus it was necessary for the Christ to suffer and to rise from the dead the third day, and that repentance and remission of sins should be preached in His name to all nations, beginning at Jerusalem.' I have a few troubling thoughts to spew in response to such bold ignorant assertions.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/02/12/what-a-late-god/

12/02/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

AA14-15 Roadwise 80%

Appeal of a Written Decision on a Request for Remission or Mitigation of Penalty dated December 15, 2015, issued by the Pierce County Public Works Department, Jeffery Dobson, owner of Roadwise, Inc.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/03/03/aa14-15-roadwise/

03/03/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

SAB431 75%

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/04/12/sab431/

12/04/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

2.1 HKFYG Report and Financial Statements 2016.compressed 74%

Miscellaneous expenses 雜項支出 2,979,243 2,626,563 ──────── ──────── 香港青年協會非法定帳目聲明 500,232,638 489,142,721 截至2016年3月31日年度 ──────── ──────── Surplus before other comprehensive (loss)/income 18,726,249 23,921,026 上述截至2016年3月31日年度的數字,雖然來源於香港青年協會相關年度的財務報表,但不構成香港青年協會就該年度的法 其他全面(虧損)/收入前盈餘 ──────── ──────── 定帳目。有關財務報表以英文編製,中文本乃根據英文本翻譯。如兩個版本有歧異,則以英文本為準。根據公司條例第436條 要求披露的與這些法定帳目有關的更多信息如下: Other comprehensive income 其他全面收入 Items that may be reclassified to statement of income or expenditure 香港青年協會將按照公司條例第662(3)條及附表6第3部的要求,按時向公司註冊處處長遞交有關帳目。 其後可重新分類至收入及支出表的項目 香港青年協會的核數師已就該帳目出具審計報告。該審計報告為無保留意見的審計報告;其中不包含審計師在不出具保留意 Net realised gains on disposal of available-for-sale financial assets (2,002,844) (649,620) 出售可供出售金融資產之淨收益 見的情況下以強調的方式提請使用者注意的任何事項,亦不包含根據公司條例第406(2),407(2)或(3)條作出的聲明。 Fair value (losses)/gains on available-for-sale financial assets 可供出售金融資產之公允價值(虧損)/增益 Valuation loss on available-for-sale financial assets 可供出售金融資產之減值損失 (4,574,287) 1,119,088 1,904,613 - 81 Appendix HKFYG LEE SHAU KEE COLLEGE LIMITED STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 AUGUST 2015 THE INCORPORATED MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE OF HKFYG LEE SHAU KEE PRIMARY SCHOOL STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 AUGUST 2015 香港青年協會李兆基書院有限公司 全面收入表 截至2015年8月31日年度 香港青年協會李兆基小學法團校董會 全面收入表 截至2015年8月31日年度 2015 HK$ 2014 HK$ Income 收入 Government grants 政府資助 Air-conditioning fee received 空調收入 Bank interest income 利息收入 Donations for Teaching and Learning Enhancement Scheme 教與學增進計劃捐款 Other donations 其他外界捐款 Income from sundry sales 銷售收入 Quality Education fund 優質教育基金 Jockey Club life-wide learning fund 香港賽馬會全方位學習基金 Programme income 活動收入 2014 HK$ 277,846 635,135 39,450,181 34,230,600 7,902 5,405 15,558,225 14,339,808 618,061 605,473 Income 收入 30,123,482 25,342,127 179,400 156,300 179 205 500,000 500,000 17,450 5,900 178,240 134,551 4,000 247,800 53,220 56,435 579,821 559,134 Donations 外界捐款 Government subsidy 政府資助 Interest income 利息收入 School fees 學費 Sundry income 其他收入 Grants for capital expenditures 非經常性開支撥款 Expenditure 支出 23,191 14,400 ──────── ──────── 55,935,406 49,830,821 (50,630,946) (44,704,240) ──────── ──────── 5,304,460 5,126,581 - (33,741) Grants for capital expenditures 非經常性開支撥款 523,057 523,057 Sundry income 其他收入 224,690 159,020 ──────── ──────── 32,383,539 27,684,529 (32,261,422) (26,926,289) ──────── ──────── 122,117 758,240 - - ──────── ──────── 122,117 758,240 ════════ ════════ Accumulated fund 累積基金 112,114 37,971 Government grants reserve 政府資助儲備 535,471 466,339 Teaching and Learning Enhancement Scheme 教與學增進計劃 (312,544) 53,895 Deferred capital reserve 非經常性遞延儲備 (212,924) 200,035 4,700,277 4,886,086 ──────── ──────── ════════ ════════ 122,117 758,240 ════════ ════════ Expenditure 支出 Total income less expenditure 年度盈餘 Other comprehensive income for the year 年度其他全面收入 Total comprehensive income for the year 年度總全面收入 Total income less expenditure 年度盈餘 Other comprehensive loss 其他全面虧損 Items that may be reclassified to statement of income or expenditure 其後可重新分類至收入及支出表的項目 Capital expenditures financed by setup fund 由開辦經費資助的非經常性開支 Provision for fee remission 學費減免撥備 Representing 相當於︰ 82 2015 HK$ (604,183) (206,754) ──────── ──────── 4,700,277 4,886,086 ════════ ════════ Accumulated fund 累積基金 5,406,859 4,982,593 Deferred capital reserve 非經常性遞延儲備 (102,399) 110,247 Total comprehensive income for the year 年度總全面收入 Representing 相當於︰ Fee remission reserve 學費減免儲備 (604,183) (206,754) ──────── ──────── 83

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/03/19/2-1-hkfyg-report-and-financial-statements-2016-compressed/

19/03/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

CVOnline 72%

    RECOGNITION Fellowships Margaret L. Whitford Fellowship, Full Tuition­Remission, 2015­17, Chatham University.    Green Scholar: Research & Teaching Assistantship 2014­15, University of Pittsburgh.    Awards Gerald Stern Poetry Prize, 2015, University of Pittsburgh.    Scholarship to Chautauqua Writers Festival, 2015, Chautauqua, NY.    First Place, Westmoreland Arts & Heritage Poetry Contest, 2013, Jim Daniels.          2  APPEARANCES Featured Readings   Classic Lines Bookstore, Nov 2015, Pittsburgh, PA.    Pittsburgh Poetry Review ​ Launch Party, Nov 2015, Pittsburgh, PA.    Word Circus, Most Wanted Fine Arts Gallery, Sept 2015, Pittsburgh, PA.    The Rectangle​  Launch Party, Mar 2015, Albuquerque, NM.    Pitt­Greensburg Writers Festival, with Sheila Squillante, Apr 2015, Greensburg, PA.    Conferences Presenter: Original Poetry, Sigma Tau Delta Conference, Mar 2015, Albuquerque, NM.    Presenter: Original Poetry, Sigma Tau Delta Conference, Mar 2014, Savannah, GA.    Panels Panelist, “Minority Feminisms and Fiction Post­1970,” Sigma Tau Delta Conference, Mar   2015, Albuquerque, NM.    Panelist, “We the Animals, We the Archetypes,” Sigma Tau Delta Conference, Mar 2014,   Savannah, GA.    PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES Editing Editor, (Moore, Caroline) ​ Punk Rock Entrepreneur: Running a Business Without Losing   Your Values. ​ Portland: Microcosm, 2016. Print. Forthcoming.    Guest Editor, ​ Pittsburgh Poetry Review,​  Winter 2016. Print. Forthcoming.    Editor­in­Chief, ​ Pendulum Literary Magazine,​  2013­15. Print. Greensburg, PA.    Copy Editor, ​ The Insider​ , Jan 2015­Apr 2015. Print. Greensburg, PA.  Copywriting Copywriter & Digital Media Strategist, Inventionland, 2015­present, Pittsburgh, PA.  3  Freelance Copywriter, ​ ShannonSankey.com​ , 2012­present, Pittsburgh, PA.  Copywriter, Carney+Co., 2012­15, Greensburg, PA.    COMMUNITY Writing Instructor, Words Without Walls, Allegheny County Jail, Jun­Jul 2016.    Host, Word Circus Reading Series, Most Wanted Fine Arts Gallery, 2015­17,   Pittsburgh, PA.    Certified Adult Literacy Instructor, YWCA USA, 2013­15, Greensburg, PA.    Writing Instructor, GED Prep, YWCA USA, 2013­15, Greensburg, PA.    Panelist, Social Media Advisory Group, Blackburn Center Against Domestic and Sexual   Violence, 2013­15, Greensburg, PA.    Host, Spread the Word! Reading Series, University of Pittsburgh, 2011­15,   Greensburg, PA.    CREATIVE PROJECTS Poetry Collection Working Title: ​ Body, Autoimmune.  Poems access the experience and language of disease through several selves:   the disembodied self, the ill body, the mother’s body, the child, the woman.   Personas confront and empathize with one another in a fractured, lyric dialogue   of chronic illness.    REFERENCES Available upon request.   

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/12/01/cvonline/

01/12/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

SAB 411 PDF 68%

S.A.B. 4.2.0.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/02/16/sab-411-pdf/

16/02/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

2016.01.04 08-10-48Reena Nair cv 2016 65%

Correlation of hematologic and cytogenetic remission.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/09/11/2016010408-10-48reena-nair-cv-2016/

11/09/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

The Blood, The Marrow, The Giant Needle 65%

You probably know that since I entered remission almost 24 months ago, I have had several blood transfusions – seven, actually – to aid in treating something called Aplastic Anemia or AA, Aplastic Basically my bone marrow doesn’t make enough red and white blood cells, and platelets.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/04/24/the-blood-the-marrow-the-giant-needle/

24/04/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

contracerycii05 64%

FROM THE PRAYERS OF PREPARATION FOR COMMUNION  REGARDING “WORTHINESS” OF THE HOLY MYSTERIES    In the prayers for preparation for Holy Communion, written by several  different  Holy  Fathers,  we  find  the  repetition  of  this  belief  in  utter  unworthiness for Holy Communion, whether one has fasted or not. Note also,  that among the Fathers who wrote these prayers are St. Basil the Great and St.  John Chrysostom, the greatest luminaries among the Anatolian‐Cappadocian  Fathers. Yet these most awesome and splendid examples of sanctity, whether  they fasted “in the finer and broader sense,” as Metropolitan Kirykos calls it,  by  no  means  considered  themselves  “worthy  to  commune.”  For  it  is  not  abstaining from foods that make one worthy, but rather abstaining from sins,  and all men have sinned save Christ who alone is perfect, and save Theotokos  who  is  the  purest  temple  of  the  Lord  from  her  very  childhood,  but  was  hallowed, sanctified and consecrated by God at the hour of the Annunciation.  The rest of us are sinners, even the saints, but their holiness is owing to God’s  mercy upon them due to their purity of life, and their theosis is owing to the  grace of God that overshadowed them, as they lived every day in Christ.     The  fact that the saints were  not  worthy  in and of  themselves, but  by  the  grace  of  God,  can  be  well  understood  by  reading  their  prayers  of  preparation  for  Holy  Communion.  For  these  prayers  were  written  by  saints  who,  in  their  shortcomings,  were  also  sinners;  and  they  wrote  these  prayers  for  the  sake  of  sinners  who,  just  like  them,  strive  by  God’s  grace  to  become  saints. Thus, in the second troparion in the preparation for Holy Communion  we read: “How can I, the unworthy one, shamelessly dare to partake of Thy Holy  Gifts?”  In  the  last  few  troparia  in  the  service  of  preparation  for  Holy  Communion, we read: “Into the splendor of Thy Saints how shall I, the unworthy  one, enter?...” and again “O Man‐befriending Master, Lord Jesus my God, let not  these holy Gifts be unto me for judgment through mine unworthiness…”    St. Basil the Great (+ 1 January, 397), in his first prayer of preparation  for Holy Communion, writes: “… For I have sinned, O Lord, I have sinned against  Heaven  and  before  Thee,  and  I  am  not  worthy  to  gaze  upon  the  height  of  Thy  glory… Wherefore, though I am unworthy of both heaven and earth, and even of this  transient life…” In his second prayer we read: “I know, O Lord, that I partake of  Thine immaculate Body and precious Blood unworthily, and that I am guilty, and  eat and drink judgment to myself, not discerning the Body and Blood of Thee, my  Christ and God…”     St.  John  Chrysostom  (+14  September,  407),  in  his  first  prayer  of  preparation  for  Holy  Communion,  writes:  “O  Lord  my  God,  I  know  that  I  am  not worthy, nor sufficient, that Thou shouldest come under the roof of the house of  my soul, for all is desolate and fallen, and Thou hast not in me a place worthy to  lay Thy head…” In his third prayer we read: “O Lord Jesus Christ my God, loose,  remit,  forgive,  and  pardon  the  failings,  faults,  and  offences  which  I,  Thy  sinful,  unprofitable,  and  unworthy  servant  have  committed  from  my  youth,  up  to  the  present day and hour…”    If in any place in the prayers of preparation for Holy Communion there  is  a  statement  of  worthiness  within  man,  it  is  claimed  that  Christ  and  the  Mysteries  themselves  are  the  source  of  that  worthiness.  By  no  means  are  mankind’s own works, such as fasting, considered to make one worthy. Thus,  Blessed Chrysostom writes: “I believe, O Lord, and I confess that thou art truly the  Christ, the Son of the living God, who didst come into the world to save sinners,  of whom I am chief. And I believe that this is truly Thine own immaculate Body,  and  that  this is truly Thine  own precious Blood. Wherefore I  pray  thee, have mercy  upon me and forgive my transgressions both voluntary and involuntary, of word and  of deed, of knowledge and of ignorance; and make me worthy to partake without  condemnation of Thine immaculate Mysteries, unto remission of my sins and  unto life everlasting. Amen.”    St.  Symeon  the  Translator  (+9  November,  c.  950)  writes:  “…O  Christ  Jesus, Wisdom and Peace and Power of God, Who in Thy assumption of our nature  didst suffer Thy life‐giving and saving Passion, the Cross, the Nails, the Spear, and  Death,  mortify  all  the  deadly  passions  of  my  body.  Thou  Who  in  Thy  burial  didst spoil the dominions of hell, bury with good thoughts my evil schemes and  scatter  the  spirits  of  wickedness.  Thou  Who  by  Thy  life‐giving  Resurrection  on  the  third  day  didst  raise  up  our  fallen  first  Parent,  raise  me  up  who  am  sunk  in  sin  and  suggest  to  me  ways  of  repentance.  Thou  Who  by  Thy  glorious  Ascension  didst deify our nature which Thou hadst assumed and didst honor it by Thy session at  the  right  hand  of  the  Father,  make  me  worthy  by  partaking  of  Thy  holy  Mysteries of a place at Thy right hand among those who are saved. Thou Who  by  the  descent  of  the  Spirit,  the  Paraclete,  didst  make  Thy  holy  Disciples  worthy  vessels, make me also a recipient of His coming. Thou Who art to come again to  judge  the  World  with  justice,  grant  me  also  to  meet  Thee  on  the  clouds,  my  Maker  and  Creator,  with  all  Thy  Saints,  that  I  may  unendingly  glorify  and  praise  Thee with Thy Eternal Father and Thy all‐holy and good and life‐giving Spirit, now  and ever, and to the ages of ages. Amen.”    St. Symeon the New Theologian (+12 March, 1022) wrote a poem that  clearly explains how a communicant must regard himself as utterly unworthy  to  receive  the  Holy Body and  Blood  of  the  Lord,  and  entirely hope  in  God’s  mercy:  From sullied lips,   From an abominable heart,   From an unclean tongue,   Out of a polluted soul,   Receive my prayer, O my Christ.   Reject me not,   Nor my words, nor my ways,   Nor even my shamelessness,   But give me courage to say   What I desire, my Christ.   And even more, teach me   What to do and say.   I have sinned more than the harlot…  And all my sins   Take from me, O God of all,   That with a clean heart,   Trembling mind   And contrite spirit   I may partake of Thy pure   And all‐holy Mysteries   By which all who eat and drink Thee   With sincerity of heart   Are quickened and deified…  Therefore I fall at Thy feet   And fervently cry to Thee:   As Thou receivedst the Prodigal   And the Harlot who drew near to Thee,   So have compassion and receive me,   The profligate and the prodigal,   As with contrite spirit   I now draw near to Thee.   I know, O Saviour, that no other   Has sinned against Thee as I,   Nor has done the deeds   That I have committed.   But this again I know   That not the greatness of my offences   Nor the multitude of my sins   Surpasses the great patience   Of my God,   And His extreme love for men.   But with the oil of compassion   Those who fervently repent   Thou dost purify and enlighten   And makest them children of the light,   Sharers of Thy Divine Nature…    St.  John  Damascene  (+4  December,  749),  in  his  first  prayer  of  preparation  for  Holy  Communion,  thus  writes:  “O  Lord  and  Master  Jesus  Christ, our God, who alone hath power to forgive the sins of men, do thou, O Good  One who lovest mankind, forgive all the sins that I have committed in knowledge or  in  ignorance,  and  make  me  worthy  to  receive  without  condemnation  thy  divine, glorious, immaculate and life‐giving Mysteries; not unto punishment  or  unto  increase  of  sin;  but  unto  purification,  and  sanctification  and  a  promise of thy Kingdom and the Life to come; as a protection and a help to  overthrow the adversaries, and to blot out my many sins. For thou art a God of  Mercy  and  compassion  and  love  toward  mankind,  and  unto  Thee  we  ascribe  glory  together  with  the  Father  and  the  Holy  Spirit;  now  and  ever,  and  unto  ages  of  ages.  Amen.”     In his second prayer he writes: “I stand before the gates of thy Temple, and  yet I refrain not from my evil thoughts. But do thou, O Christ my God, who didst  justify  the  publican,  and  hadst  mercy  on  the  Canaanite  woman,  and  opened  the gates of Paradise to the thief; open unto me the compassion of thy love toward  mankind, and receive me as I approach and touch thee, like the sinful woman and  the woman with the issue of blood; for the one, by embracing thy feet received the  forgiveness  of  her  sins,  and  the  other  by  but  touching  the  hem  of  thy  garment  was  healed. And I, most sinful, dare to partake of thy whole Body. Let me not be consumed  but receive me as thou didst receive them, and enlighten the perceptions of my  soul, consuming the accusations of my sins; through the intercessions of Her that  without stain gave Thee birth, and of the heavenly Powers; for thou art blessed unto  ages of ages. Amen.”    While waiting in line to receive Holy Communion, the following verses  of the Blessed Translator are read:  Behold I approach for Divine Communion.  O Creator, let me not be burnt by communicating,  For Thou art Fire which burns the unworthy.  But purify me from every stain.   Tremble, O man, when you see the deifying Blood,  For it is coal that burns the unworthy.  The Body of God both deifies and nourishes;  It deifies the spirit and wondrously nourishes the mind.      The  following  troparion  clearly  expresses  with  what  mindset  and  manner  one  must  approach  the  Mysteries.  Let  it  not  be  thought  that  a  Christian is meant to state the following simply as an act of false humility. On  the contrary, the Christian must truly deny any sense of his self‐worth in the  eyes  of  Christ,  and  must  therefore  submit  himself  entirely  to  Christ’s  judgment, praying that the Lord will judge according to his great mercy and  not according to our sins. The troparion reads: “Of thy Mystic Supper, O Son of  God, accept me today as a communicant; for I will not speak of thy Mystery to Thine  enemies, neither will I give thee a kiss as did Judas; but like the thief will I confess  thee: Remember me, O Lord, in Thy Kingdom. Remember me, O Master, in Thy  Kingdom. Remember me, O Holy One, when Thou comest into Thy Kingdom.” After  a few other troparia, the following prayer is read: “Sovereign Lover of men, Lord  Jesus  my  God,  let  not  these  Holy  Things  be  to  me  for  judgment  through  my  being  unworthy,  but  for  the  purification  and  sanctification  of  my  soul  and  body, and as a pledge of the life and kingdom to come. For it is good for me to  cling to God and to place in the Lord my hope of salvation.”    As  one  approaches  the  Holy  Chalice,  one  should  crosswise  fold  his  hands over his chest, and reflect in his mind the following petition: “Neither  unto  judgement,  nor  unto  condemnation  be  my  partaking  of  thy  Holy  Mysteries,  O  Lord,  but  unto  the  healing  of  soul  and  body.”  When  the  priest  administers the Holy Communion he announces: “The servant of God, [name],  partakes of the precious, most holy and most pure Body and Blood of our Lord, God  and Saviour, Jesus Christ, for the remission of sins and life everlasting. Amen.”  Then, the communicant kisses the bottom of the chalice, thinking of himself as  the harlot who kissed the feet of the Lord while anointing them with precious  myrrh and her penitent tears, while contemplating the Seraphim who touched  a  burning  coal  to  the  mouth  of  Isaiah,  saying:  “Behold,  This  hath  touched  thy  lips, and will take away thine iniquities, and will purge thy sins (Isaiah 6:7).” 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/contracerycii05/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

How SAD 64%

There is much discussion in the current literature about what constitutes remission, recovery, or cure for BPD.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/05/23/how-sad/

23/05/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

contracerycii06 57%

FROM THE ANAPHORAE OF THE ANCIENT CHURCH  REGARDING “WORTHINESS” OF HOLY COMMUNION    This  can  also  be  demonstrated  by  the  secret  prayers  within  Divine  Liturgy.  From  the  early  Apostolic  Liturgies,  right  down  to  the  various  Liturgies  of  the  Local  Churches  of  Jerusalem,  Antioch,  Alexandria,  Constantinople,  Rome,  Gallia,  Hispania,  Britannia,  Cappadocia,  Armenia,  Persia, India and Ethiopia, in Liturgies that were once vibrant in the Orthodox  Church,  prior  to  the  Nestorian,  Monophysite  and  Papist  schisms,  as  well  as  those  Liturgies  still  in  common  use  today  among  the  Orthodox  Christians  (namely,  the  Liturgies  of  St.  John  Chrysostom,  St.  Basil  the  Great  and  the  Presanctified Liturgy of St. Gregory the Dialogist), the message is quite clear  in all the mystic prayers that the clergy and the laity are referred to as entirely  unworthy, and truly they are to believe they are unworthy, and that no action  of  their  own can make them worthy  (i.e.  not  even  fasting), but  that  only the  Lord’s  mercy  and  grace  through  the  Gifts  themselves  will  allow  them  to  receive communion without condemnation. To demonstrate this, let us begin  with the early Apostolic Liturgies, and from there work our way through as  many of the oblations used throughout history, as have been found in ancient  manuscripts, among them those still offered within Orthodoxy today.    St.  James  the  Brother‐of‐God  (+23  October,  62),  First  Bishop  of  Jerusalem, begins his anaphora as follows: “O Sovereign Lord our God, condemn  me  not,  defiled with a multitude  of sins: for,  behold, I  have  come to  this Thy divine  and heavenly mystery, not as being worthy; but looking only to Thy goodness, I direct  my voice to Thee: God be merciful to me, a sinner; I have sinned against Heaven,  and before Thee, and am unworthy to come into the presence of this Thy holy  and spiritual table, upon which Thy only‐begotten Son, and our Lord Jesus Christ,  is mystically set forth as a sacrifice for me, a sinner, and stained with every spot.”     Following the creed, the following prayer is read: “God and Sovereign of  all, make us, who are unworthy, worthy of this hour, lover of mankind; that  being  pure  from  all  deceit  and  all  hypocrisy,  we  may  be  united  with  one  another  by  the  bond  of  peace  and  love,  being  confirmed  by  the  sanctification  of  Thy divine knowledge through Thine only‐begotten Son, our Lord and Saviour Jesus  Christ,  with  whom  Thou  art  blessed,  together  with  Thy  all‐holy,  and  good,  and  quickening Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.”     Then  right  before  the  clergy  are  to  partake  of  Communion,  the  following is recited: “O Lord our God, the heavenly bread, the life of the universe, I  have  sinned  against  Heaven,  and  before  Thee,  and  am  not  worthy  to  partake  of  Thy  pure  Mysteries;  but  as  a  merciful  God,  make  me  worthy  by  Thy  grace,  without  condemnation  to  partake  of  Thy  holy  body  and  precious  blood,  for  the  remission of sins, and life everlasting.”     After all the clergy and laity have received Communion, this prayer is  read: “O God, who through Thy great and unspeakable love didst condescend  to  the  weakness  of  Thy  servants,  and  hast  counted  us  worthy  to  partake  of  this heavenly table, condemn not us sinners for the participation of Thy pure  Mysteries;  but  keep  us,  O  good  One,  in  the  sanctification  of  Thy  Holy  Spirit,  that  being made holy, we may find part and inheritance with all Thy saints that have been  well‐pleasing to Thee since the world began, in the light of Thy countenance, through  the  mercy  of  Thy  only‐begotten  Son,  our  Lord  and  God  and  Saviour  Jesus  Christ,  with  whom  Thou  art  blessed,  together  with  Thy  all‐holy,  and  good,  and  quickening  Spirit:  for  blessed  and  glorified  is  Thy  all‐precious  and  glorious  name,  Father,  Son,  and Holy Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages.”     From  these  prayers  is  it  not  clear  that  no  one  is  worthy  of  Holy  Communion, whether they have fasted or not, but that it is God’s mercy that  bestows  worthiness  upon  mankind  through  participation  in  the  Mystery  of  Confession  and  receiving  Holy  Communion?  This  was  most  certainly  the  belief  of  the  early  Christians  of  Jerusalem,  quite  contrary  to  Bp.  Kirykos’  ideology of early Christians supposedly being “worthy of communion” because  they supposedly “fasted in the finer and broader sense.”    St. Mark the Evangelist (+25 April, 63), First Bishop of Alexandria, in  his  Divine  Liturgy,  writes:  “O  Sovereign  and  Almighty  Lord,  look  down  from  heaven  on  Thy  Church,  on  all  Thy  people,  and  on  all  Thy  flock.  Save  us  all,  Thine  unworthy  servants,  the  sheep  of  Thy  fold.  Give  us  Thy  peace,  Thy  help,  and  Thy  love,  and  send  to  us  the  gift  of  Thy  Holy  Spirit,  that  with  a  pure  heart  and  a  good  conscience  we  may  salute  one  another  with  an  holy  kiss,  without  hypocrisy,  and  with no hostile purpose, but guileless and pure in one spirit, in the bond of peace  and love, one body and one spirit, in one faith, even as we have been called in one hope  of our calling, that we may all meet in the divine and boundless love, in Christ Jesus  our  Lord,  with  whom  Thou  art  blessed,  with  Thine  all‐holy,  good,  and  life‐creating  Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.”     Later in the Liturgy the following is read: “Be mindful also of us, O Lord,  Thy  sinful  and  unworthy  servants,  and  blot  out  our  sins  in  Thy  goodness  and  mercy.” Again we read: “O holy, highest, awe‐inspiring God, who dwellest among  the saints, sanctify us by the word of Thy grace and by the inspiration of Thy all‐ holy Spirit; for Thou hast said, O Lord our God, Be ye holy; for I am holy. O Word  of God, past finding out, consubstantial and co‐eternal with the Father and the Holy  Spirit,  and  sharer  of  their  sovereignty,  accept  the  pure  song  which  cherubim  and  seraphim, and the unworthy lips of Thy sinful and unworthy servant, sing aloud.”     Thus  it  is  clear  that  whether  he  had  fasted  or  not,  St.  Mark  and  his  clergy and flock still considered themselves unworthy. By no means did they  ever entertain the theory that “they fasted in the finer and broader sense, that is,  they were worthy of communion,” as Bp. Kirykos dares to say. On the contrary,  St. Mark and the early Christians of Alexandria believed any worthiness they  could achieve would be through partaking of the Holy Mysteries themselves.     Thus, St. Mark wrote the following prayer to be read immediately after  Communion: “O Sovereign Lord our God, we thank Thee that we have partaken of  Thy  holy,  pure,  immortal,  and  heavenly  Mysteries,  which  Thou  hast  given  for  our  good,  and  for  the  sanctification  and  salvation  of  our  souls  and  bodies.  We  pray  and  beseech Thee, O Lord, to grant in Thy good mercy, that by partaking of the holy  body and precious blood of Thine only‐begotten Son, we may have faith that  is not ashamed, love that is unfeigned, fullness of holiness, power to eschew  evil  and  keep  Thy  commandments,  provision  for  eternal  life,  and  an  acceptable defense before the awful tribunal of Thy Christ: Through whom and  with  whom be glory and power to Thee, with Thine  all‐holy, good,  and  life‐creating  Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.”    St. Peter the Apostle (+29 June, 67), First Bishop of Antioch, and later  Bishop  of  Old  Rome,  in  his  Divine  Liturgy,  writes:  “For  unto  Thee  do  I  draw  nigh, and, bowing my neck, I pray Thee: Turn not Thy countenance away from me,  neither cast me out from among Thy children, but graciously vouchsafe that I, Thy  sinful  and  unworthy  servant,  may  offer  unto  Thee  these  Holy  Gifts.”  Again  we  read:  “With  soul  defiled  and  lips  unclean,  with  base  hands  and  earthen  tongue,  wholly  in  sins,  mean  and  unrepentant,  I  beseech  Thee,  O  Lover  of  mankind, Saviour of the hopeless and Haven of those in danger, Who callest sinners  to repentance, O Lord God, loose, remit, forgive me a sinner my transgressions,  whether deliberate or unintentional, whether of word or deed, whether committed in  knowledge or in ignorance.”    St.  Thomas  the  Apostle  (+6  October,  72),  Enlightener  of  Edessa,  Mesopotamia, Persia, Bactria, Parthia and India, and First Bishop of Maliapor  in India, in his Divine Liturgy, conveyed through his disciples, St. Thaddeus  (+21  August,  66),  St.  Haggai  (+23  December,  87),  and  St.  Maris  (+5  August,  120), delivered the following prayer in the anaphora which is to be read while  kneeling: “O our Lord and God, look not on the multitude of our sins, and let  not  Thy  dignity  be  turned  away  on  account  of  the  heinousness  of  our  iniquities; but through Thine unspeakable grace sanctify this sacrifice of Thine,  and grant through it power and capability, so that Thou mayest forget our many  sins, and be merciful when Thou shalt appear at the end of time, in the man whom  Thou  hast  assumed  from  among  us,  and  we  may  find  before  Thee  grace  and  mercy,  and be rendered worthy to praise Thee with spiritual assemblies.”     Upon  standing,  the  following  is  read:  “We  thank  Thee,  O  our  Lord  and  God, for the abundant riches of Thy grace to us: we who were sinful and degraded,  on account of the multitude of Thy clemency, Thou hast made worthy to celebrate  the holy Mysteries of the body and blood of Thy Christ. We beg aid from Thee for the  strengthening of our souls, that in perfect love and true faith we may administer Thy  gift  to  us.”  And  again:  “O  our  Lord  and  God,  restrain  our  thoughts,  that  they  wander  not  amid  the  vanities  of  this  world.  O  Lord  our  God,  grant  that  I  may  be  united to the affection of Thy love, unworthy though I be. Glory to Thee, O Christ.”     The priest then reads this prayer on behalf of the faithful: “O Lord God  Almighty,  accept  this  oblation  for  the  whole  Holy  Catholic  Church,  and  for  all  the  pious and righteous fathers who have been pleasing to Thee, and for all the prophets  and apostles, and for all the martyrs and confessors, and for all that mourn, that are  in straits, and are sick, and for all that are under difficulties and trials, and for all the  weak and the oppressed, and for all the dead that have gone from amongst us; then for  all that ask a prayer from our weakness, and for me, a degraded and feeble sinner.  O  Lord  our  God,  according  to  Thy  mercies  and  the  multitude  of  Thy  favours,  look  upon  Thy  people,  and  on  me,  a  feeble  man,  not  according  to  my  sins  and  my  follies,  but  that  they  may  become  worthy  of  the  forgiveness  of  their  sins  through  this  holy  body,  which  they  receive  with  faith,  through  the  grace  of  Thy mercy, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.”     The  following  prayer  also  indicates  that  the  officiators  consider  themselves unworthy but look for the reception of the Holy Mysteries to give  them remission of sins: “We, Thy degraded, weak, and feeble servants who are  congregated in Thy name, and now stand before Thee, and have received with joy the  form  which  is  from  Thee,  praising,  glorifying,  and  exalting,  commemorate  and  celebrate this great, awful, holy, and divine mystery of the passion, death, burial, and  resurrection of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ. And may Thy Holy Spirit come, O  Lord,  and  rest  upon  this  oblation  of  Thy  servants  which  they  offer,  and  bless  and  sanctify it; and may it be unto us, O Lord, for the propitiation of our offences and  the forgiveness of our sins, and for a grand hope of resurrection from the dead, and  for a new life in the Kingdom of the heavens, with all who have been pleasing before  Him.  And  on  account  of  the  whole  of  Thy  wonderful  dispensation  towards  us,  we  shall  render  thanks  unto  Thee,  and  glorify  Thee  without  ceasing  in  Thy  Church,  redeemed  by  the  precious  blood  of  Thy  Christ,  with  open  mouths  and  joyful  countenances:  Ascribing  praise,  honour,  thanksgiving,  and  adoration  to  Thy  holy,  loving, and life‐creating name, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.”     Finally, the following petition indicates quite clearly the belief that the  officiators  and  entire  congregation  are  unworthy  of  receiving  the  Mysteries:  “The  clemency  of  Thy  grace,  O  our  Lord  and  God,  gives  us  access  to  these  renowned, holy, life‐creating, and Divine Mysteries, unworthy though we be.”    St. Luke the Evangelist (+18 October, 86), Bishop of Thebes in Greece,  in  his  Divine  Liturgy,  writes:  “Bless,  O  Lord,  Thy  faithful  people  who  are  bowed  down  before  Thee;  deliver  us  from  injuries  and  temptations;  make  us  worthy  to  receive  these  Holy  Mysteries  in  purity  and  virtue,  and  may  we  be  absolved  and sanctified by them. We offer Thee praise and thanksgiving and to Thine Only‐ begotten  Son  and  to  Thy  Holy  Spirit,  now  and  ever,  and  unto  the  ages  of  ages.  Amen.”     St. Dionysius the Areopagite (+3 October, 96), Bishop of Athens, in his  Divine Liturgy, writes: “Giver of Holiness, and distributor of every good, O Lord,  Who  sanctifiest  every  rational  creature with  sanctification,  which  is from Thee;  sanctify,  through  Thy  Holy  Spirit,  us  Thy  servants,  who  bow  before  Thee;  free  us  from all servile passions of sin, from envy, treachery, deceit, hatred, enmities,  and  from  him,  who  works  the  same,  that  we  may  be  worthy,  holily  to  complete  the  ministry  of  these  life‐giving  Mysteries,  through  the  heavenly  Master, Jesus Christ, Thine Only‐begotten Son, through Whom, and with Whom, is  due to Thee, glory and honour, together with Thine All‐holy, Good and Life‐creating  Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.” Thus, it is God that offers  sanctification  to  mankind,  purifies  mankind  from  sins,  and  makes  mankind  worthy of the Mysteries. This worthiness is not achieved by fasting.    In  the  same  Anaphora  we  read:  “Essentially  existing,  and  from  all  ages;  Whose  nature  is  incomprehensible,  Who  art  near  and  present  to  all,  without  any  change of Thy sublimity; Whose goodness every existing thing longs for and desires;  the intelligible indeed, and creature endowed with intelligence, through intelligence;  those  endowed  with  sense,  through  their  senses;  Who,  although  Thou  art  One  essentially, nevertheless art present with us, and amongst us, in this hour, in which  Thou  hast  called  and  led  us  to  these  Thy  holy  Mysteries;  and  hast  made  us  worthy to stand before the sublime throne of Thy majesty, and to handle the sacred  vessels  of  Thy  ministry  with  our  impure  hands:  take  away  from  us,  O  Lord,  the  cloak of iniquity in which we are enfolded, as from Jesus, the son of Josedec the  High  Priest,  thou  didst  take  away  the  filthy  garments,  and  adorn  us  with  piety  and  justice,  as  Thou  didst  adorn  him  with  a  vestment  of  glory;  that  clothed  with  Thee  alone,  as  it  were  with  a  garment,  and  being  like  temples  crowned  with  glory, we may see Thee unveiled with a mind divinely illuminated, and may feast,  whilst  we,  by  communicating  therein,  enjoy  this  sacrifice  set  before  us;  and  that we may render to Thee glory and praise, together with Thine Only‐begotten Son,  and Thine All‐holy, Good and Life‐creating Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of  ages. Amen.” Once again, worthiness derives from God and not from fasting.    In the same Liturgy we read: “I invoke Thee, O God the Father, have mercy  upon us, and wash away, through Thy grace, the uncleanness of my evil deeds;  destroy, through Thy  mercy, what I have done, worthy of wrath; for I do not 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/contracerycii06/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

contracerycii01 56%

CAN FASTING MAKE ONE “WORTHY” TO COMMUNE?    In the first paragraph of his first letter to Fr. Pedro, Bp. Kirykos writes:  “...  according  to  the  tradition  of  our  Fathers  (and  that  of  Bishop  Matthew  of  Bresthena),  all  Christians,  who  approach  to  receive  Holy  Communion,  must  be  suitably prepared, in order to worthily receive the body and blood of the Lord. This  preparation indispensably includes fasting according to one’s strength.” To further  prove that he interprets this worthiness as being based on fasting, Metropolitan  Kirykos  continues  further  down  in  reference  to  his  unhistorical  understanding  about the  early  Christians:  “They fasted  in the fine and  broader  sense, that is, they were worthy to commune.”    Here Bp. Kirykos tries to fool the reader by stating the absolutely false  notion  that  the  Holy  Fathers  (among  them  St.  Matthew  of  Bresthena)  supposedly agree with his unorthodox views. The truth is that not one single  Holy Father of the Orthodox Church agrees with Bp. Kirykosʹs views, but in  fact, many of them condemn these views as heretical. And as for referring to  St.  Matthew  of  Bresthena,  this  is  extremely  misleading,  which  is  why  Bp.  Kirykos  was  unable  to  provide  a  quote.  In  reality,  St.  Matthew’s  five‐page‐ long treatise on Holy Communion, published in 1933, repeatedly stresses the  importance  of  receiving  Holy  Communion  frequently  and  does  not  mention  any  such  pre‐communion  fast  at  all.  He  only  mentions  that  one  must  go  to  confession,  and  that  confession  is  like  a  second  baptism  which  washes  the  soul and prepares it for communion. If St. Matthew really thought a standard  week‐long  pre‐communion  fast  for  all  laymen  was  paramount,  he  certainly  would have mentioned it somewhere in his writings. But in the hundreds of  pages  of  writings  by  St.  Matthew  that  have  been  collected,  no  mention  is  made of such a fast. The reason for this is because St. Matthew was a Kollyvas  Father  just  as  was  his  mentor,  St.  Nectarius  of  Aegina.  Also,  the  fact  St.  Matthew left Athos and preached throughout Greece and Asia Minor during  his earlier life, is another example of his imitation of the Kollyvades Fathers.    As  much  as  Bp.  Kirykos  would  like  us  to  think  that  the  Holy  Fathers  preach that a Christian, simply by fasting, can somehow “worthily receive the  body  and  blood  of  the  Lord,”  the  Holy  Fathers  of  the  Orthodox  Church  actually  teach  quite  clearly  that  NO  ONE  is  worthy  of  Holy  Communion,  except by the grace of God Himself. Whether someone eats oil on a Saturday  or  doesnʹt  eat  oil,  cannot  be  the  deciding  point  of  a  person’s  supposed  “worthiness.”  In  fact,  even  fasting,  confession,  prayer,  and  all  other  things  donʹt  come  to  their  fulfillment  in  the  human  soul  until  one  actually  receives  Holy  Communion.  All  of  these  things  such  as  fasting,  prayers,  prostrations,  repentance,  etc,  do  indeed  help  one  quench  his  passions,  but  they  by  no  means make him “worthy.” Yes, we confess our sins to the priest. But the sins  aren’t loosened from our soul until the priest reads the prayer of pardon, and  the  sins  are  still  not  utterly  crushed  until  He  who  conquered  death  enters  inside the human soul through the Mystery of Holy Communion. That is why  Christ  said  that  His  Body  and  Blood  are  shed  “for  the  remission  of  sins.”  (Matthew 26:28).     Fasting  is  there  to  quench  our  passions  and  prevent  us  from  sinning,  confession is there so that we can recall our sins and repent of them, but it is  the  Mysteries  of  the  Church  that  operate  on  the  soul  and  grant  to  it  the  “worthiness” that the human soul can by no means attain by itself. Thus, the  Mystery  of  Pardon  loosens  the  sins,  and  the  Mystery  of  Holy  Communion  remits  the  sins.  For  of  the  many  Mysteries  of  the  Church,  the  seven  highest  mysteries have this very purpose, namely, to remit the sins of mankind by the  Divine  Economy.  Thus,  Baptism  washes  away  the  sins  from  the  soul,  while  Chrism  heals  anything  ailing  and  fills  all  voids.  Thus,  Absolution  washes  away the sins, while Communion heals the soul and body and fills it with the  grace of God. Thus, Unction cures the maladies of soul and body, causing the  body  and  soul  to  no  longer  be  divided  but  united  towards  a  life  in  Christ;  while Marriage (or Monasticism) confirms the plurality of persons or sense of  community that God desired when he said of old “Be fruitful and multiply”  (or in the case of Monasticism, “Behold, how good and how pleasant it is for  brethren  to  dwell  together  in  unity!”).  Finally,  the  Mystery  of  Priesthood  is  the  authority  given  by  Christ  for  all  of  these  Mysteries  to  be  administered.  Certainly, it is an Apostolic Tradition for mankind to be prepared by fasting  before  receiving  any  of  the  above  Mysteries,  be  it  Baptism,  Chrism,  Absolution,  Communion,  Unction,  Marriage  or  Priesthood.  But  this  act  of  fasting itself does not make anyone “worthy!”    If  someone  thinks  they  are  “worthy”  before  approaching  Holy  Communion,  then  the  Holy  Communion  would  be  of  no  positive  affect  to  them.  In  actuality,  they  will  consume  fire  and  punishment.  For  if  anyone  thinks  that  their  own  works  make  themselves  “worthy”  before  the  eyes  of  God, then surely Christ would have died in vain. Christ’s suffering, passion,  death  and  Resurrection would have  been  completely unnecessary.  As Christ  said,  “They  that  be  whole  need  not  a  physician,  but  they  that  are  sick  (Matthew 9:12).” If a person truly thinks that by not partaking of oil/wine on  Saturday,  in  order  to  commune  on  Sunday,  that  this  has  made  them  “worthy,”  then  by  merely  thinking  such  a  thing  they  have  already  proved  themselves unworthy of Holy Communion. In fact, they are deniers of Christ,  deniers  of  the  Cross  of  Christ,  and  deniers  of  their  own  salvation  in  Christ.  They  rather  believe  in  themselves  as  their  own  saviors.  They  are  thus  no  longer Christians but humanists.     But  is  humanism  a  modern  notion,  or  has  it  existed  before  in  the  history  of  the  Church?  In  reality,  the  devil  has  hurled  so  many  heresies  against  the  Church  that  he  has  run  out  of  creativity.  Thus,  the  traps  and  snares he sets are but fancy recreations of ancient heresies already condemned  by the Church. The humanist notions entertained by Bp. Kirykos are actually  an offshoot of an ancient heresy known as Pelagianism. 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/contracerycii01/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

ArtUpStory 55%

A teenage cancer survivor, she obtained her GED after going into remission at 18, and at 19 began attending classes at Westmoreland County Community College in Greensburg, where her family lives.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2012/04/20/artupstory/

20/04/2012 www.pdf-archive.com

Dr-Griesinger Veroeffentlichungen 55%

Complete remission and early death after intensive chemotherapy in patients aged 60 years or older with acute myeloid leukaemia:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/08/25/dr-griesinger-veroeffentlichungen/

25/08/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

ddw sandiego2016 agenda 52%

Digital Agenda Book May 21-24, 2016 Exhibit Dates:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/01/30/ddw-sandiego2016-agenda/

30/01/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

Easter 3- Jubilate (Final) 50%

And I believe in one holy Christian and apostolic Church, I acknowledge one Baptism for the remission of sins, and I look for the resurrection of the dead and the life T of the world to come.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2020/05/03/easter-3--jubilate-final/

03/05/2020 www.pdf-archive.com

w E 18850400 49%

“No man cometh unto the Father” — no man has “oneness” with him except by the broken body and shed blood of the Lamb of God which taketh away the sin of the world, who “ put away sin by the sacrifice of himself.” We looked also at the blood shed for many for the remission of sin s —not for ours [the Church’s] only, but also for the sins of the whole world, and we saw in the wine its symbol:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/08/04/w-e-18850400/

04/08/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

JDIT-2014-1028-005 49%

The patient underwent VMAT for the recurrent disease and obtained a partial remission for a period of 16 months [6].

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/05/30/jdit-2014-1028-005/

30/05/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

03-17B 46%

entreat the merciful God, that He grant our souls remission of transgressions!

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/03/11/03-17b/

11/03/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

tmp 7486-herpes 2-24 -17 0 1 -864626654 45%

Herpes infections of all kinds are relatively easy to treat and put into remission with various modalities of traditional Chinese medicine.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/01/23/tmp-7486-herpes-2-24-17-0-1-864626654/

23/01/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

011672 44%

In einer speziellen Vergleichsstudie zur sexuellen Dysfunktion konnte bei Patienten in Remission unter Agomelatin ein numerischer Trend (statistisch nicht signifikant) zu weniger sexueller Dysfunktion bei den Erregungs- und Orgasmus-Scores nach der Sex Effects Scale (SEXFX) als unter Venlafaxin gezeigt werden.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/11/21/011672/

21/11/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

Newsletter -- October 2014 pdf 43%

Most types of psoriasis go through cycle, flaring for a few weeks or months, then subsiding for a me or even going into complete remission.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/10/11/newsletter-october-2014-pdf/

11/10/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

LDSymptoms 42%

Waxing
&
Waning
Symptoms
/
Latent
Periods
 “This pattern of persistent infection, acute disease, disease remission, and intermittent bouts of exacerbation is typical of untreated human Lyme disease.” Barthold SW;

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/29/ldsymptoms/

29/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com