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asexuality info for GSA copy 100%

Demisexual people only experience sexual attraction to people they are very emotionally close to and they may or may not be in a romantic relationship with this person(s).

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2012/02/10/asexuality-info-for-gsa-copy/

09/02/2012 www.pdf-archive.com

Before Sunset Idealism 94%

Celine was ever the romantic but was constantly troubled by her own mortality and measured the world against her political and social ideologies.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/12/08/before-sunset-idealism/

08/12/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

Romantics By Leroy Bluing Digital Copy 91%

Romantics DIVULGED NOTES By Leroy Bluing Miae.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/05/11/romantics-by-leroy-bluing-digital-copy/

11/05/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

BrookeMike 81%

In a romantic connection, your sense of friendship with each other makes a firm foundation and you find an easy harmony in the way you choose to spend your free time and discretionary money while together.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/12/01/brookemike/

30/11/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

thesublimecity 80%

  Towards an Urban Sublime: Expressing the Inexpressible in Urban Romantic Poetry  As the industrial revolution brought about the rapid urbanization of cities throughout  Europe, writers who were previously concerned with the aesthetics of nature and the countryside  found themselves grappling with an entirely new set of poetic and philosophical concerns. The  teeming crowds, towering structures and spectacular sights that they encountered in the novel  environment of the city incited in them feelings of overwhelming terror and awe akin to those  typically associated with the romantic “sublime.” However, as we look more closely at the  city­focused works of poets like Baillie, Wordsworth and Hood, we begin to see that there is a  fundamental difference between the “natural” sublime of earlier romantic poetry and the “urban”  sublime of the city poem. Whereas the poet’s sublime experience in nature is typically associated  with some sort of catharsis or transcendence, forcing man to come to terms with the limitations  of his own humanity, the urban sublime instead incites a feelings of wonder and disgust at the  incredible potential of that humanity itself, or—as Anne Janowitz put it in her essay ​ The  Artifactual Sublime​ —it forces man to confront “the self as if it were not the self; to experience  the madeness of the human world as if it were different stuff than the labour of persons.”   While it is true that, as Janowitz notes, this “mis­recognition” of the sublime object often  resulted in the experience of “romantic alienation,” I argue that the use of sublime language and  natural imagery also acted as a sort of coping mechanism for their writers. Through the  experience of the “urban” sublime is of course intrinsically linked to feelings of terror and  isolation, the fact that these poets were describing particularly urban experiences in terms of  something formerly associated with nature helped them to bridge the gap between the urban  world and the natural one. This technique, therefore, served the dual purpose of expressing the        unfamiliarity of this new landscape and familiarizing it, allowing these poets to discover, as  Wordsworth put it, that the underlying “spirit of Nature” was still upon them, even in this “vast  receptacle.”   In Thomas Hood’s delightfully erratic ​ Moral Reflections on the Cross of Saint Paul’s​ , we  find a perfect example of the struggle many poets faced to familiarize the sublimely  overwhelming urban environment. Hood’s speaker—who is presumably a tourist visiting  London for the first time—is hilariously unable to produce any original or insightful  “reflections” about the complex cityscape he sees spread out before him, and resorts instead to  stringing together a bizarre collection of references and metaphors that don’t seem to fit together  into a cohesive vision.   The speaker’s numerous allusions to “classic” works of literature suggest that he feels a  longing to express the “profound” nature of the landscape he is viewing, but even these  references come off as disjointed and confused. In the poem’s first stanza, the speaker compares  the ball of Saint Paul’s cathedral to Mount Olympus, the home of the gods in Greek mythology.  He then immediately moves on to reference a figure from Roman mythology, when he proclaims  that he is sitting “Among the gods, by Jupiter!” The speaker’s thoughts turn again towards the  literary in the third stanza, when—looking down at the city crowds beneath him—the speaker  feels the need to question the nature of man. “What is life?” He asks himself, and answers with  an apparent reference to a now cliche line from William Shakespeare's ​ As You Like it​ : “And what  is life? And all its ages— / There’s seven stages!” Before he is able to offer any sort of “real”  philosophical inquiry into what he means by this, however, the speaker distracts himself by  naming off the seven neighborhoods of London, and never returns to the subject.         While this random misfiring of half­baked references helps develop the speaker’s  delightfully zany personality, it also gestures at the bewilderment he feels upon taking in the  sprawling landscape of London from above. Though the speaker cannot adequately express the  profound emotional impact of this landscape in his own words—and it is clear that he does not  have the educational background to substantiate even an insightful literary comparison—he still  feels the urge to grasp for images and analogies that he associates with grandiosity and power.  This attempt—and failure—to express the inexpressible is a common struggle in the literature of  the sublime, and in Joanna Baillie’s poem ​ London​ —which was written around the same time as  Hood’s piece—we are introduced to yet another speaker who cannot quite find the right words to  describe the overwhelming urban landscape. The difference here is that Baillie’s speaker is more  familiar with the concept of the natural sublime, and she uses the language associated with it to  explore the ways that the experience of urban sublime is both related to and separate from the  experience of the sublime in nature.  The poem’s initial description of the city—in which we find the city viewed again from  above, from the hills of Hampstead “through the clear air”—presents the urban space as a rather  innocuous, almost quaint vision. The London skyline seems to the speaker a “goodly sight,” and  its structures are rendered in relation to familiar human figures. The spires of St. Paul’s cathedral  flank the structure “in kindred grace, like twain of sisters dear,” the “ridgy roofs” of the city’s  buildings sit amicably “side by side.” The entire vision is “softly tinted” by the distance of the  viewer, _____. However, as the air begins to grow denser, and “moistened winds” prevail, the  city’s landscape transfigures into something far more menacing. The “thin soft haze” of the  poem’s first section becomes a “grand panoply of smoke arrayed,” and the dome of St. Paul’s        Cathedral—which is now surrounded not by quaint spires, but by “heavy” clouds that sail around  its imposing dome—seems “a curtain gloom / Connecting heaven and earth,—a threatening sign  of doom.” The shifting weather strips the humanity from the city’s landscape, and the language  of the speaker quickly shifts to the language that references the natural sublime. The combination  of almost ethereal    However, this use of sublime language also allows the speaker to articulate the  differences between the urban world and the natural one. Though the speaker seems compelled  to compare the structure to prodigious natural figures (she states that the cathedral “might some  lofty alpine peak be deemed”) it becomes apparent that these metaphors are not quite sufficient  to describe the sight she is witnessing. Because its form reveals “man’s artful structure,” (and by  extension the “artful structure” of man’s society), the cathedral cannot be viewed as totally  natural. Instead, it is referred to as “more than natural,” and seems to transcend the boundaries of  both humanity and nature as it first “connects heaven and hearth” and then, a few lines later  seems “far removed from Earth.”   This somewhat confused description demonstrates the speaker’s complex feelings about  the urban landscape. Though she knows one thing for certain about this cathedral—“She is  sublime”—the speaker cannot quite find the language she needs to describe the sense of the  particularly “urban” sublime she is experiencing. She knows the cathedral is a product of  mankind, and that the power that it is imbued with is intrinsically linked with the oppressive  church that it represents and the often corrupt society that it is a part of. Part of the reason that  the church looks seems to her so terrifying is certainly the fact that entering the streets of the city  means succumbing to the dominance of the church, the government, and society as a whole.         Language has always failed to fully express the sublime experience, however, and the  speaker’s attempts to conflate the urban sublime of the city with the natural sublime simply  demonstrates a desire to give a recognizable form to the terror she is experiencing—in order to  truly become what Lyotard calls an “expressive witness to the inexpressible,” the speaker must  carry thought and rationality to their logical conclusions, and for a romantic poet the world can  best be rationalized and understood in terms of the rural. In contrast to Hood’s speaker, whose  manic metaphor­hopping was a symptom of a mind unprepared to grapple with the urban  landscape’s complexities, Baillie’s speaker logically considers the unfamiliar in terms of her own  experience, and makes the urban feel, in a way, like an extension of nature.   This blending of the natural and the urban is epitomized in the final portion of Baillie’s  poem, when the viewpoint shifts to the perspective of a “distant traveller.” From afar, this  traveller is able to view the London in its entirety, and finds himself awestruck by the stars in the  “luminous canopy” above the city that seem to be “cast up from myriads of lamps that shine /  Along her streets in many a starry line.” The “flood of human life in motion” creates a noise that  sounds to the traveller like the “voice of a tempestuous ocean,” and he finds his soul filled with a  “sad but pleasing awe” upon hearing it. These magnificent sights, which seem at once human  and natural, express the rich suggest that the city is capable of igniting in the human soul the  same complex emotions that a sublime natural splendor might.  Wordsworth took this idea to its ultimate conclusion as he navigated the ​ bacchanalian  chaos that is St. Bartholomew’s fair at the conclusion of ​ The Prelude, Book Seven. ​ In  Wordsworth’s poem, we are not viewing London from above, but from the very trenches of the  city, and the sublimity he is experiencing comes not from the contemplation of the urban   

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/04/20/thesublimecity/

20/04/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

handout 11-28 78%

Emily Wallace November 28, 2016 MUS 664 Smith Performance Practice Presentations “The Romantic Tradition and Lineage, Genealogy, Inheritance…” The Phenomenon:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/11/30/handout-11-28/

30/11/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

Before Sunrise Religion 77%

For instance, we seen in any moment when confronted with the vaguely supernatural (when visiting the graveyard, when having her palm read, when hearing about Quaker weddings, and simply when entering the church) Céline's demeanor shifts toward the romantic.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/12/08/before-sunrise-religion/

08/12/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

TGS BN GuillaumeCLARISSE 77%

This creature of cleaving wing, The Immanent Will that stirs and urges everything les opposés s’attirent Studies have found that people are more likely to be attracted to and pursue romantic relationships with individuals who are more like themselves across a broad range of personal characteristics, including age, religion, political orientation, and certain aspects of intelligence.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/02/14/tgs-bn-guillaumeclarisse/

14/02/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

Swim England Guide to Engaging Trans People in Swimming 77%

Sexual orientation Gender identity A person’s emotional, romantic and/or sexual attraction to another person.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/03/21/swim-england-guide-to-engaging-trans-people-in-swimming/

21/03/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

IV RHD Europe USA August TravelFocus 76%

BRITAIN days Departs 2014 Price Was Red Hot Price Save Per person Save Per couple HOT1558 19 French Elegance Sep 02 $6,999 $6,125 $874 $1,748 HOT1559 17 Splendours of France and Spain Sep 07 $5,350 $4,680 $670 $1,340 HOT1561 14 Highlights of Eastern Europe Sep 15 $4,150 $3,630 $520 $1,040 HOT1562 18 Romantic Britain &

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/08/11/iv-rhd-europe-usa-august-travelfocus/

11/08/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

press kit napier avalon jones 75%

Be the whole fucking vineyard.” Attitude to give the songs a romantic folk-punk rock spark.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/01/21/press-kit-napier-avalon-jones/

21/01/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

Forfaits EN 2011 74%

Trash the dress or romantic photo shoot.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2011/04/05/forfaits-en-2011/

05/04/2011 www.pdf-archive.com

xiaoleilesbianfilmthesis 71%

Taiwan: Blue Gate Crossing (藍色大門) (2004), directed by Chin­Yen Yee (易智言) 18­20  Conclusion                                                                                                                          21­22  Resources                                                                                                                           22­23  Filmography                                                                                                                          23                                                Introduction  Some recent mainstream Chinese films present a butch tomboy character as a "bro"  1 who seems to live an asexual existence with no romantic possibilities ​ . The lesbian  characters in these films navigate a society where schoolgirl romance is moderately  tolerated​ , ​ but long­term romantic relationships that mirror the heteronormative nuclear  family are unaccepted by older generations. As I recognized the increasing prevalence of  this cultural phenomenon my interest in an emerging Chinese intersectional feminist  rhetoric​  ​ developed. Subsequently, I became intrigued by how the mediascape impacts  marginalized queer identities in China. With these topics in mind, I did a meta­analysis of  Taiwanese lesbian melodramas to explore the transnational impact of queerness in a  distinctly "Chinese" context.  For the purpose of this Keystone project, I  steer away from discussing in  2 detail the complicated political status of Taiwan ​  and focus more specifically on  representations of gendered bodies on screen in four films. It is also  important to state that  this paper has been filtered through my non­local perspective.A wave of excitement lapped  at the shore of Taiwan recently following the January election of Tsai Ing­wen, who  promised to recognize same­sex marriages and civil unions in Taiwan.  At the time of this  Keystone's publication, same­sex marriage is not recognized in Taiwan or any other East  Asian country. Despite the increased prevalence of positive representations in media, this  1 "Lao Zheng, typical Beijing chick. When she is around girls she is manly, when she is around guys she is  manlier. She loves plaid shirts, dislikes pretty dresses. Wherever she goes a trail of screams follow." (Girls, film).    2  Separate government, same cultural heritage seems to be the conclusion of least controversy for  Mainlanders and Taiwanese.       remains one of the main struggles the LGBTQ community in their quest for greater  acceptance.    Queer values in a Chinese and Taiwanese context often spring from transnational  engagement with media from a variety of countries outside of the sinosphere. Through  mobile apps, blogs, web videos, independent films, zines, academic articles, and music  activism and awareness of the visibility of LGBTQ Taiwanese is becoming more prevalent  than ever before. However, despite this increased exposure unfortunately many  stereotypes remain consistent with previous representations.   Using a queer studies lens, this Keystone will present analyses of four films in order  to reach a more clear understanding of queer identities in a sinospheric context. I will  argue for the formation of a lesbian identity as one that counters heteronormative  Confucian family values, subverts state control of bodies, and challenges cultural hegemony  of the nuclear family, public space, and self­identity politics in Taiwan. By recognising  patterns of resistance to lesbian identity via observing inter­generational conflict,  nostalghia for schooltime romance, and other recurring themes themes through the four  films, I discovered some possible communicative tools to help resolve some of these  struggles and present lesbian relationships in a more varied light with a greater likelihood  for a happy ending.          

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/06/10/xiaoleilesbianfilmthesis/

10/06/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

Fiji A5 brochure Dec17[1] 67%

A multi award-winning and romantic haven of relaxed refinement.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/12/21/fiji-a5-brochure-dec17-1/

21/12/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

Free PDF Report 67%

How can you amplify the natural triggers that cause romantic attraction?

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/01/30/free-pdf-report/

30/01/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

Scenic Direct Mail Piece 67%

Always imagined yourself cruising through the romantic waterways of Europe?

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/09/14/scenic-direct-mail-piece/

14/09/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

Interpreter of Maladies 66%

“It is a job like any other.” “But so romantic,” Mrs.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/08/12/interpreter-of-maladies/

12/08/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

Women Double image 66%

Once he realizes that Penfield is not a rival despite his inclination towards her, Sultan like Bennett becomes his romantic-erotic opponent.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/11/19/women-double-image/

19/11/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

Christian Moesby De Beers Company Assessment 62%

Cinematic productions, magazines and celebrities were paid large sums to don and display diamonds in romantic settings, to induce in the public the idea that the giving of a diamond would represent the giving of love.3 The truthful resilience of diamonds were further associated with the metaphorical durability of a romantic relationship, and so in 1947, Frances Gerety, of N.W.Ayer advertisements, coined the phrase "A Diamond Is Forever”.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2013/12/23/christian-moesby-de-beers-company-assessment/

23/12/2013 www.pdf-archive.com

MIOC Application 2014 62%

A work/movement in the French Romantic tradition __________________________________________________________________ Edition__________________________________________________________________ By initialing below, I affirm that I am eligible to enter the Miami International Organ Competition, and that each recorded piece truthfully represents my playing, containing no edits or splices.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2013/08/01/mioc-application-2014/

01/08/2013 www.pdf-archive.com

JumpStart Health Challenge 62%

◽ ️ Make it romantic.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/01/24/jumpstart-health-challenge/

24/01/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

FinalReview 62%

Final Review of British Literature    Restoration Literature  ● “A Modest Proposal” ○ Author: ​ Jonathan Swift  ○ Summary  ● “The Diary of Samuel Pepys” ○ Author: Samuel Pepys  ○ Bio/Summary  ● “A Journal of the Plague Year” ○ Author: ​ Daniel Defoe  ○ Summary    Romantic Literature  ● Wordsworth ○ Bio  ○ Poems:  ■ “Lines Composed a few Miles Above Tintern Abbey”  ■ “London, 1802”  ■ “The World is Too Much with Us”  ■ “Daffodils”  ● Coleridge ○ Bio  ○ Poems:  ■ “Kubla Kahn”  ■ “Rime of the Ancient Mariner”  ● Shelley ○ Bio  ○ Poems: [​ Word​ ]  ● Keats ○ Bio  ○ Poems: [​ Word​ ]   ● Byron ○ Bio  ○ Poems: [​ Word​ ]    The Picture of Dorian Gray​ //Oscar Wilde  ● Major themes  ● Major symbols/motifs  ● Major plot points    Brave New World​ //Aldous Huxley  ● Major themes  ● Major symbols/motifs  ● Major plot points    Cold Reading  ● ● ● ● ● ● ●       Rhyme pattern  Meter  Theme  Literary devices  Symbol  Period  Resources:  ● Poetry Vocabulary #1  ● Poetry Vocabulary #2 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/06/01/finalreview/

01/06/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

SissiSwissTours 62%

1 von 2 http://www.sissiswisstours.ch/68/de/sissi-in-montreux A Romantic &

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/11/29/sissiswisstours/

29/11/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

The Five-To-Arrive Guide 62%

LOOK 1 SIENNA AZTEC EARRINGS FEELING ROMANTIC LACE DRESS LOOK 2 HOT TICKET PENCIL SKIRT LAY LOW PLUNGING BODYSUIT LOOK 3 STAY IN YOUR LANE FLORAL SKIRT DON'T WAIT UP CROP TOP

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/11/17/the-five-to-arrive-guide/

17/11/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

SHI QIAN 1 62%

ucchero z Italian rock singer With its husky and charismatic singing, the new romantic rock style, sometimes wild and unrestrained, sometimes warm and passionate, his music combines the traditional Italian folk music and the characteristics of a huge classical music heritage, and can extensively absorb the national music Culture, suchas the United States blues music, Spain and Latin American countries, folk music style, he is popular in Europe and the United States and Latin American countries the main reason.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/01/08/shi-qian-1/

08/01/2017 www.pdf-archive.com