Search


PDF Archive search engine
Last database update: 13 May at 15:25 - Around 76000 files indexed.


Show results per page

Results for «sacrament»:


Total: 50 results - 0.076 seconds

cyprus 97%

It being understood that the Apostolic Succession in the Anglican Church by the Sacrament of Order was not broken at the Consecration of the first Archbishop of this Church, Matthew Parker, and the visible signs being present in Orders among the Anglicans by which the grace of the Holy Spirit is supplied, which enables the ordinand for the functions of his particular order, there is no obstacle to the recognition by the Orthodox Church of the validity of Anglican Ordinations in the same way that the validity of the ordinations of the Roman, Old Catholic, and Armenian Church are recognized by her.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/cyprus/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

Program 5-3 97%

Elder Zachary Michael Poe Philippines Legaspi zachary.poe@myldsmail.net Sister Claudia Munoz 1980 E 116th St Suite 200 Carmel, IN 46032 Hermana Madaline Berger California San Fernando Mission 23504 Lyons Ave Ste 107 Santa Clarita, CA 91321 Every Member a Missionary Sacrament Meeting May 3, 2015 Presiding..........................................................Bishop Dennis Day Conducting......................................................Bishop Dennis Day Music Conductor.........................................Sister Debra Michaeli Organist.............................................................Sister Patti Morse Opening Hymn:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/05/03/program-5-3/

03/05/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

A Overview of Catholicism 91%

Respect All Authority SACRAMENT 1.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/02/07/a-overview-of-catholicism/

07/02/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

Somic Shilpa Shastras Draft 88%

This alters the molecule slightly allowing for it to be used as a Religious Sacrament, in a smoked or snuff form.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/05/06/somic-shilpa-shastras-draft/

06/05/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

contracerycii02 87%

BELIEF THAT ONE IS MADE “WORTHY” BY THEIR OWN  WORKS RATHER THAN THE MYSTERIES IS PELAGIANISM    Pelagius  (c.  354‐420)  was  a  heretic  from  Britain,  who  believed  that  it  was  possible  for  man  to  be  worthy  or  even  perfect  by  way  of  his  free  will,  without the necessity of grace. In most cases, Pelagius reverted from this strict  form  and  did  not  profess  it.  For  this  reason,  many  of  the  councils  called  to  condemn the false teaching, only condemn the heresy of Pelagianism, but do  not  condemn  Pelagius  himself.  But  various  councils  actually  do  condemn  Pelagius along with Pelagianism. Various Protestants have tried to disparage  the  Orthodox  Faith  by  calling  its  beliefs  Pelagian  or  Semipelagian.  But  the  Orthodox  Faith  is  neither  the  one,  nor  the  other,  but  is  entirely  free  from  Pelagianism.  The  Orthodox  Faith  is  also  free  from  the  opposite  extreme,  namely, Manicheanism, which believes that the world is inherently evil from  its very creation. The Orthodox Faith is the Royal Path. It neither falls to the  right nor to the left, but remains on the straight path, that is, “the Way.” The  Orthodox  Faith does  indeed  believe  that good  works are  essential, but these  are for the purpose of gaining God’s mercy. By no means can mankind grant  himself  “worthiness”  and  “perfection”  by  way  of  his  own  works.  It  is  only  through God’s uncreated grace, light, powers and energies, that mankind can  truly be granted worthiness and perfection in Christ.    The most commonly‐available source of God’s grace within the Church  is through the Holy Mysteries, particularly the Mysteries of Baptism, Chrism,  Absolution and Communion, which are necessary for salvation. Baptism can  only be received once, for it is a reconciliation of the fallen man to the Risen  Man,  where  one  no  longer  shares  in  the  nakedness  of  Adam  but  becomes  clothed with Christ. Chrism can be repeated whenever an Orthodox Christian  lapses into schism or heresy and is being reconciled to the Church. Absolution  can also serve as a method of reconciliation from the sin of heresy or schism  as well as from any personal sin that an Orthodox Christian may commit, and  in receiving the prayer of pardon one is reconciled to the Church. For as long  as  an  Orthodox  Christian  sins,  he  must  receive  this  Mystery  repeatedly  in  order to prepare himself for the next Mystery. Communion is reconciliation to  the  Immaculate  Body  and  Precious  Blood  of  Christ,  allowing  one  to  live  in  Christ. This is the ultimate Mystery, and must be received frequently for one  to experience a life in Christ. For Orthodox Christianity is not a philosophy or  a way of thought, nor is it merely a moral code, but it is the Life of Christ in  man, and the way one can truly live in Christ is through Holy Communion.    Pelagianism in the strictest form is the belief that mankind can achieve  “worthiness” and “perfection” by way of his own free will, without the need  of  God’s  grace  or  the  Mysteries  to  be  the  source  of  that  worthiness  and  perfection. Rather than viewing good works as a method of achieving God’s  mercy,  they  view  the  good  works  as  a  method  of  achieving  self‐worth  and  self‐perfection. The most common understanding of Pelagianism refers to the  supposed “worthiness” of man by way of having a good will or good works  prior  to  receiving  the  Mystery  of  Baptism.  But  the  form  of  Pelagianism  into  which  Bp.  Kirykos  falls  in  his  first  letter  to  Fr.  Pedro,  is  in  regards  to  the  supposed  “worthiness”  of  Christians  purely  by  their  own  work  of  fasting.  Thus, in his first letter to Fr. Pedro, Bp. Kirykos does not mention the Mystery  of  Confession  (or  Absolution)  anywhere  in  the  text  as  a  means  of  receiving  worthiness,  but  attaches  the  worthiness  entirely  to  the  fasting  alone.  Again,  nowhere in the letter does he mention the Holy Communion itself as a source  of  perfection,  but  rather  entertains  the  notion  that  mankind  is  capable  of  achieving such perfection prior to even receiving communion. This is the only  way  one  can  interpret  his  letter,  especially  his  totally  unhistorical  statement  regarding the early Christians, in which he claims: “They fasted in the fine and  broader sense, that is, they were worthy to commune.”    St. Aurelius Augustinus, otherwise known as St. Augustine of Hippo  (+28 August, 430), writes: “It is not by their works, but by grace, that the doers  of the law are justified… Now [the Apostle Paul] could not mean to contradict himself  in  saying,  ‘The  doers  of  the  law  shall  be  justified  (Romans  2:13),’  as  if  their  justification came through their works, and not through grace; since he declares that a  man  is  justified  freely  by  His  grace  without  the  works  of  the  law  (Romans  3:24,28)   intending  by  the  term  ‘freely’  nothing  else  than  that  works  do  not  precede  justification.  For  in  another  passage  he  expressly  says,  ‘If  by  grace,  then  is  it  no  more of works; otherwise grace is no longer grace (Romans 11:6).’ But the statement  that ‘the doers of the law shall be justified (Romans 2:13)’ must be so understood, as  that  we  may  know  that  they  are  not  otherwise  doers  of  the  law,  unless  they  be  justified, so that justification does not subsequently accrue to them as doers of the law,  but  justification  precedes  them  as  doers  of  the  law.  For  what  else  does  the  phrase  ‘being justified’ signify than being made righteous,—by Him, of course, who justifies  the ungodly man, that he may become a godly one instead? For if we were to express a  certain  fact  by  saying,  ‘The  men  will  be  liberated,’  the  phrase  would  of  course  be  understood  as  asserting  that  the  liberation  would  accrue  to  those  who  were  men  already;  but  if  we  were  to  say,  The  men  will  be  created,  we  should  certainly  not  be  understood as asserting that the creation would happen to those who were already in  existence,  but  that  they  became  men  by  the  creation  itself.  If  in  like  manner  it  were  said, The doers of the law shall be honoured, we should only interpret the statement  correctly  if  we  supposed  that  the  honour  was  to  accrue  to  those  who  were  already  doers of the law: but when the allegation is, ‘The doers of the law shall be justified,’  what else does it mean than that the just shall be justified? for of course the doers of  the law are just persons. And thus it amounts to the same thing as if it were said,  The doers of the law shall be created,—not those who were so already, but that they  may  become  such;  in  order  that  the  Jews  who  were  hearers  of  the  law  might  hereby  understand that they wanted the grace of the Justifier, in order to be able to become its  doers also. Or else the term ‘They shall be justified’ is used in the sense of, They shall  be deemed, or reckoned as just, as it is predicated of a certain man in the Gospel, ‘But  he,  willing  to  justify  himself  (Luke  10:29),’—meaning  that  he  wished  to  be  thought  and  accounted  just.  In  like  manner,  we  attach  one  meaning  to  the  statement,  ‘God  sanctifies  His  saints,’  and  another  to  the  words,  ‘Sanctified  be  Thy  name (Matthew 6:9);’  for in the former case we suppose the words to mean that He  makes those to be saints who were not saints before, and in the latter, that the  prayer  would  have  that  which  is  always  holy  in  itself  be  also  regarded  as  holy  by  men,—in  a  word,  be  feared  with  a  hallowed  awe.”  (Augustine  of  Hippo,  Antipelagian Writings, Chapter 45)    Thus the doers of the law are justified by God’s grace and not by their  own good works. The purpose of their own good works is to obtain the mercy  of  God,  but  it  is  God’s  grace  through  the  Holy  Mysteries  that  bestows  the  worthiness  and  perfection  upon  mankind.  Blessed  Augustine  does  not  only  speak  of  this  in  regards  to  the  Mystery  of  Baptism, but  applies  it  also  to  the  Mystery of Communion. Thus he writes of both Mysteries as follows:     “Now  [the  Pelagians]  take  alarm  from  the  statement  of  the  Lord,  when  He  says,  ‘Except  a  man  be  born  again,  he  cannot  see  the  kingdom  of  God  (John  3:3);’  because in His own explanation of the passage He affirms, ‘Except a man be born of  water and of the Spirit, he cannot enter into the kingdom of God (John 3:5).’ And so  they  try to ascribe to unbaptized  infants, by the  merit  of  their innocence, the gift of  salvation  and  eternal  life,  but  at the  same  time,  owing  to  their  being  unbaptized,  to  exclude them from the kingdom of heaven. But how novel and astonishing is such  an  assumption,  as  if  there  could  possibly  be  salvation  and  eternal  life  without heirship with Christ, without the kingdom of heaven! Of course they  have  their  refuge,  whither  to  escape  and  hide  themselves,  because  the  Lord  does  not  say,  Except  a  man  be  born  of  water  and  of  the  Spirit,  he  cannot  have  life,  but—‘he  cannot  enter  into  the  kingdom  of  God.’  If  indeed  He  had  said  the  other,  there  could  have  risen  not  a  moment’s  doubt.  Well,  then,  let  us  remove  the  doubt;  let  us  now  listen to the Lord, and not to men’s notions and conjectures; let us, I say, hear what  the Lord says—not indeed concerning the sacrament of the laver, but concerning the  sacrament of His own holy table, to which none but a baptized person has a right  to approach: ‘Except ye eat my flesh and drink my blood, ye shall have no life  in you  (John  6:53).’ What do we want more? What  answer  to  this can be  adduced,  unless it be by that obstinacy which ever resists the constancy of manifest truth?” (op.  cit., Chapter 26)    Blessed  Augustine  continues  on  the  same  subject  of  how  the  early  Orthodox  Christians  of  Carthage  perceived  the  Mysteries  of  Baptism  and  Communion:  “The  Christians  of  Carthage  have  an  excellent  name  for  the  sacraments,  when  they  say  that  baptism  is  nothing  else  than  ‘salvation,’  and  the  sacrament of the body of Christ nothing else than ‘life.’ Whence, however, was  this derived, but from that primitive, as I suppose, and apostolic tradition, by which  the Churches of Christ maintain it to be an inherent principle, that without baptism  and partaking of the supper of the Lord it is impossible for any man to attain either to  the kingdom of God or to salvation and everlasting life? So much also does Scripture  testify,  according  to  the  words  which  we  already  quoted.  For  wherein  does  their  opinion, who designate baptism by the term salvation, differ from what is written: ‘He  saved us by the washing of regeneration (Titus 3:5)?’ or from Peter’s statement: ‘The  like figure whereunto even baptism doth also now save us (1 Peter 3:21)?’ And what  else do they say who call the sacrament of the Lord’s Supper ‘life,’ than that  which is written: ‘I am the living  bread which came down from heaven (John  6:51);’  and  ‘The  bread  that  I  shall  give  is  my  flesh,  for  the  life  of  the  world  (John  6:51);’  and  ‘Except  ye  eat  the  flesh  of  the  Son  of  man,  and  drink  His  blood, ye shall have no life in you (John 6:53)?’ If, therefore, as so many and such  divine  witnesses  agree,  neither  salvation  nor  eternal  life  can  be  hoped  for  by  any man without baptism and the Lord’s body and blood, it is vain to promise  these blessings to infants without them. Moreover, if it be only sins that separate man  from salvation and eternal life, there is nothing else in infants which these sacraments  can be the means of removing, but the guilt of sin,—respecting which guilty nature it  is written, that “no one is clean, not even if his life be only that of a day (Job  14:4).’ Whence also that exclamation of the Psalmist: ‘Behold, I was conceived in  iniquity; and in sins did my mother bear me (Psalm 50:5)! This is either said in  the  person of our common  humanity, or if of  himself  only David speaks,  it does  not  imply that he was born of fornication, but in lawful wedlock. We therefore ought not  to doubt that even for infants yet to be baptized was that precious blood shed, which  previous to its actual effusion was so given, and applied in the sacrament, that it was  said, ‘This is my blood, which shall be shed for many for the remission of sins  (Matthew 26:28).’  Now they who will not allow that they are under sin, deny that  there is any liberation. For what is there that men are liberated from, if they are held  to be bound by no bondage of sin? (op. cit., Chapter 34)    Now, what of Bp. Kirykos’ opinion that early Christians “fasted in the  fine  and  broader  sense,  that  is,  they  were  worthy  to  commune?”  Is  this  because  they  were  saints?  Were  all  of  the  early  Christians  who  were  frequent  communicants ascetics who fasted “in the finer and broader sense” and were  actual  saints?  Even  if  so,  does  the  Orthodox  Church  consider  the  saints  “worthy” by their act of fasting, or is their act of fasting only a plea for God’s  mercy,  while  God’s  grace  is  what  delivers  the  worthiness?  According  to  Bp.  Kirykos,  the  early  Christians,  whether they  were  saints or  not, “fasted in  the  fine  and  broader  sense,  that  is,  they  were  worthy  to  commune.”  But  is  this  a  teaching  of  Orthodoxy  or  rather  of  Pelagianism?  Is  this  what  the  saints  believed  of  themselves,  that  they  were  “worthy?”  And  if  they  didn’t  believe  they  were  worthy,  was  that  just  out  of  humility,  or  did  they  truly  consider  themselves unworthy? Blessed Augustine of Hippo, one of the champions of  his time against the heresy of Pelagianism, writes:    “In that, indeed, in the praise of the saints, they will not drive us with the zeal  of  that  publican  (Luke  18:10‐14)  to  hunger  and  thirst  after  righteousness,  but  with  the vanity of the Pharisees, as it were, to overflow with sufficiency and fulness; what  does  it  profit  them  that—in  opposition  to  the  Manicheans,  who  do  away  with  baptism—they  say  ‘that  men  are  perfectly  renewed  by  baptism,’  and  apply  the  apostle’s testimony for this,—‘who testifies that, by the washing of water, the Church  is made holy and spotless from the Gentiles (Ephesians 5:26),’—when, with a proud  and perverse meaning, they put forth their arguments in opposition to the prayers of  the Church itself. For they say this in order that the Church may be believed after holy  baptism—in which is accomplished the forgiveness of all sins—to have no further sin;  when, in opposition to them, from the rising of the sun even to its setting, in all  its members it cries to God, ‘Forgive us our debts (Matthew 6:12).’ But if they  are  interrogated  regarding  themselves  in  this  matter,  they  find  not  what  to  answer.  For if they should say that they have no sin, John answers them, that ‘they deceive  themselves, and the  truth  is not in them (1 John 1:8).’  But if they  confess their  sins, since they wish themselves to be members of Christ’s body, how will that body,  that  is,  the  Church,  be  even  in  this  time  perfectly,  as  they  think,  without  spot  or  wrinkle, if its members without falsehood confess themselves to have sins? Wherefore  in baptism all sins are forgiven, and, by that very washing of water in the word, the  Church is set forth in Christ without spot or wrinkle (Ephesians 5:27);  and unless it  were baptized, it would fruitlessly say, ‘Forgive us our debts,’ until it be brought to  glory, when there is in it absolutely no spot or wrinkle.” (op. cit., Chapter 17).    Again,  in  his  chapter  called  ‘The  Opinion  of  the  Saints  Themselves  About  Themselves,’  Blessed  Augustine  writes:  “It  is  to  be  confessed  that  ‘the  Holy Spirit, even in the old times,’ not only ‘aided good dispositions,’ which even they  allow, but that it even made them good, which they will not have. ‘That all, also, of the  prophets and apostles or saints, both evangelical and ancient, to whom God gives His  witness, were righteous, not in comparison with the wicked, but by the rule of virtue,’  is not doubtful. And this is opposed to the Manicheans, who blaspheme the patriarchs  and  prophets;  but  what  is  opposed  to  the  Pelagians  is,  that  all  of  these,  when  interrogated  concerning  themselves  while  they  lived  in  the  body,  with  one  most  accordant voice would answer, ‘If we should say that we have no sin, we deceive  ourselves, and the truth is not in us (1 John 1:8).’ ‘But in the future time,’ it is  not to be denied ‘that there will be a reward as well of good works as of evil, and that  no  one  will  be  commanded  to  do  the  commandments  there  which  here  he  has  contemned,’  but  that  a  sufficiency  of  perfect  righteousness  where  sin  cannot  be,  a  righteousness which is here hungered and thirsted after by the saints, is here hoped for 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/contracerycii02/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

DEA-Petition 83%

 Sadhus (Priests) using Marijuana, Bhang (Marijuana Milk), and Charas (Hashish) as a Sacrament regularly on Temple Premises.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/02/06/dea-petition/

06/02/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

PDF Letter 78%

According to EWTN, the principle of “‘Ecclesia suplet’ (‘the Church supplies’) does not make up for invalidity when the matter or form (the essential elements and correct words) are omitted or altered.” Thus, the Sacrament very well may have been invalid.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/05/04/pdf-letter/

04/05/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

December 15, 2013 Bulletin 77%

The Sacrament of Reconciliation Saturday 5:00 PM (SA) Sunday 8:30 AM (IC) Sunday 11:00 AM (SA) Sunday 7:00 PM (IC – when LHUP is in session) Saturdays 11:00 AM (IC) 4:00 PM (SA) or anytime upon request Holy Day of Obligation Vigil – 7:00 PM (SA) Holy Day – 7:00 PM (IC) Weekday Mass Schedule:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2013/12/13/december-15-2013-bulletin/

13/12/2013 www.pdf-archive.com

anglicanserbia1865 77%

The Church of Serbia Permitted Anglicans to Commune in 1865    (The below article is taken from an Anglican source)    ORTHODOX PRECEDENT  Orthodox  precedent  for  the  admission  of  non‐Orthodox  in  destitution  exists  as far back as the twelfth century, and was justified by the Orthodox canonist  Balsamon,  but  no  precedent  exists,  so  far  as  is  known,  for  the  public  admission for non‐Orthodox not in destitution. Neither the Patriarch nor the  Serbian  Church  is  committed  to  any  repetition  of  the  action,  nor  is  the  Orthodox  Church  as  a  whole,  nor  is  the  Anglican  Church  committed  in  any  way.  But  it  has  nevertheless  no  small  importance.  Evidently  some  of  the  Orthodox  in  Belgrade  were  not  very  happy  about  it,  fearing  it  might  be  premature.  The  Politika  said:  ʺAlthough  the  manifestation  of  the  relationship  made  so  beautifully  among  us  at  the  cathedral  was  both  touching  and  praiseworthy,  some  people  did  not  approve  the  action  of  the  Patriarch  because the Anglicans are not in formal communion with us.ʺ  Frank  Steel,  an  attaché  of  the  British  legation,  who  was  one  of  the  eight  communicants,  writes  a  letter  to  the  Church  Times  of  which  I  give  some  extracts:  ʺAs there is no English church or chaplain in Belgrade, a letter was sent to the  Patriarch,  asking  if  he  would  permit  us  to  make  our  communion  at  the  cathedral  on  Christmas  Day.  The  Patriarch  replied  expressing  his  approval,  and  personally  administered  the  Sacrament  to  four  Americans  and  four  English people, of whom I was one.ʺ  ʺI understand that no patriarch has ever officiated in this capacity before, but  His  Holiness  insisted  on  administering  the  Sacrament  himself.  I  hear  that  a  large  number  of  Orthodox  priests  have  expressed  their  disapproval  of  His  Holinessʹ  action,  and  the  newspapers  have  given  diverse  views  on  the  matter.ʺ  It would be indeed interesting if Mr. Steel would give us some more details of  what must evidently have been a very wonderful experience.  A WAR PRECEDENT  Another  letter  has  also  been  printed  in  the  same  journal  from  an  English  country parson who was communicated by a Serb priest during the war:  ʺIt  may  be  of  interest  to  know  that  during  the  war,  while  I  was  stationed  at  Salonika, I was admitted to the Sacrament of Holy Communion by the express  consent and with the utmost goodwill of the Serbian ecclesiastical authorities.  There  could  be  no  question  of  destitution  in  this  case,  for  English  chaplains  and services were well to the fore. I took it to be a grateful acknowledgement  of the kindly feelings between me and the Serbians under my command, and  who asked that I might communicate with them. I was not a chaplain.ʺ  This  is  indeed  a  remarkable  letter.  The  sum  total  of  the  matter  seems  to  be,  whatever  the  theological  issues  involved  may  be,  that  the  Serbs  like  the  Americans  and  English  and  wish  to  share  their  religious  experiences  and  privileges with them.  INTERCOMMUNION SIXTY YEARS AGO  I  am  supposed  to  chronicle  news  in  these  letters,  but  perhaps  I  may  be  pardoned for once if I delve down into the files of the Church Times as far back  as  August,  1865,  to  find  an  occasion  when  a  similar  thing  seems  to  have  happened in Belgrade. The following is quoted from a correspondent signed  W[illiam]. D[enton].  ʺWhen  I  mentioned  in  my  former  letter  that  I  received  communion  in  the  Serbian  Church  at  the  hands  of  the  Archimandrite  of  Studenitza,  I  forgot  at  the same time to point out the full significance of the act. The Archimandrite  was one of the ecclesiastics consulted by the Archbishop of Belgrade as to my  request  for  communion  on  Whitsunday,  so  that  the  administration  was  not  the  act  of  an  individual,  however  prominent  his  position,  but  was  the  synodical  act  of  the  prelates  and  inferior  clergy  of  Servia.  I  arrived  at  the  monastery of Studenitza on Monday. I left it on Wednesday, and on Thursday  I had another pleasant meeting with the Bishop of Tschatchat. I found that he  knew  all  about  the  proposed  administration  to  me  by  the  Archimandrite.  Leaving him, I had a few daysʹ travel in the interior of the country and met all  the  leading  ecclesiastics.  Among  others  I  had  pleasure  in  meeting  the  Archpriest  of  Jagodina,  whose  acquaintance  I  had  made  while  he  was  a  resident  of  the  monastery  of  Ruscavitza.  I  found  on  all  sides  the  greatest  satisfaction at my communion, and I heard the strongest desire expressed for  closer  intercourse  with  the  English  Church  on  the  ground  of  its  orthodoxy  and the prominent position given to scriptural teaching in its formularies.  ʺI  had  the  pleasure  of  staying  with  the  Bishop  of  Schabatz  and  the  opportunity  of  discussing  with  that  able  and  large‐minded  prelate  the  question of intercommunion of the Churches of England and Servia. Referring  to  my  communion  at Studenitza he hailed me as  a member  of  the  Orthodox  Church. But he did more than this. I was accompanied by an English layman  who intends to make a stay in Servia of at least two monthsʹ duration after my  leaving.  I  mentioned  that  as  he  was  accustomed  to  communicate  in  the  English Church he was unwilling to be deprived of the same blessing whilst  in a strange land. The bishop at once declared that there was no hindrance to  his communicating in Servia, and at my request gave him a letter addressed  to  all  the  clergy  of  his  diocese,  directing  them  to  administer  communion  to  him, a member of the Church of England, if he desired to receive the sacred  mysteries.  ʺThere now remained the general question of the right of all members of the  English  Church  to  communicate  simply  as  members  of  the  English  Church,  and  without  any  test  beond  that  of  their  loyal  membership  in  their  own  branch of the Church Catholic: and your readers will be glad to know that on  the  production  of  a  simple  certificate  of  real  and  living  membership,  settled  by the bishop and indicated to me, all such persons will from this time forth  be  received  as  communicants  of  the  Orthodox  Church  of  Servia.  And  intercommunion of one portion of the Orthodox Church cannot long precede  formal  intercommunion  with  the  whole  Eastern  Church.  Here  is  real  intercommunion  on  the  true  Catholic  basis,  the  beginning  I  trust  of  wider  communion.  There  is  no  doubt  much  to  labor  for,  much  to  pray  for,  much  need of ʹpatience and confidenceʹ, but here surely is the darn and promise; in  part  also  to  past  prayers  for  unity,  but  especially  may  we,  I  trust,  without  presumption, see an answer to His effectual prayer, who, in the night of His  betrayal,  prayed  ʹthat  they  all  may  [541/542]  be  one.ʹ  Who  shall  despair  and  say any longer that the unity of all Christian people is a mere dream, when in  the person of the English and Servian Churches, the distant East resumes her  intercourse  with  the  separated  West;  and  when  what  to  most  persons  since  the  Council  of  Florence  has  seemed  unattainable,  has  been  done  without  human instruments by Him who in essence and attributes is One.ʺ  Church Times OPTIMISTIC  This  is  an  extraordinarily  optimistic  letter  almost  implying  that  reunion  between  the  two  churches  was  a  fait  accompli.  But,  whatever  the  rights  and  wrongs of the facts, very little seems to have arisen from them. The following  is a portion of a leading article that appeared in the Church Times on August  26, 1865.  ʺThe  Servian  Church  has  entered  into  full  communion  with  the  Church  of  England.  This  is  the  step  to  which  we  allude.  The  efforts  of  the  ʹEastern  Church  Associationʹ  and  especially  the  energy,  perseverance,  and  personal  popularity  in  Servia  of  one  of  the  first  originators  of  that  association  have  induced  the  ancient  Orthodox  Church  in  Servia  to  admit  privately  to  Holy  Communion, and to promise to admit to participation in the sacred mysteries  any traveler, whether priest or layman of the Anglican communion, who shall  bring  with  him  certain  letters  commendatory,  the  form  of  which  will  be  arranged  and  agreed  upon  by  the  Servian  episcopate.  Thus  we  really  at  the  present moment are in communion with the whole Orthodox Church. For the  Servian Church is an Orthodox branch of the great Slavonic communion, and  is  in  full  connection  and  communion  with  Constantinople.  But  the  Servian  Church  has  recognized  our  baptism,  our  orders,  and  our  position,  and  has  admitted our members into communion with herself: therefore now at last the  Anglican  and  Eastern  Orthodox  Church  are  as  one.  What  shall  we  say?  The  heart of every believer must burst into an irrepressible Te Deum at such a truly  Christian triumph.  ʺThe  Servian  Church  which,  perhaps,  is  little  known  to  our  readers  as  yet  except  through  certain  charity‐breathing  letters  of  its  prelates,  especially  of  Archbishop  Michael,  will  soon  be  a  household  word  in  our  mouths.  We  are  bound to give the Servians the credit which is their due for their freedom of  spirit  and  their  intelligent  and  far‐seeing  charity.  English  Churchmen  must  reciprocate this mighty act of Christian brotherhood by all the means that lie  within  their  power.  The  Eastern  Church  for  a  century  past  is  a  suffering  Church. The Church of autonomous Servia has emerged from the fiery trial of  persecution  into  a  clear  sky  and  a  more  peaceful  dwelling  place.  English  Churchmen  in  future  will  find  it  impossible  to  side  with  the  infidel  and  the  Mahometan against those with whom they have broken the Bread of Life and  shared  the  Cup  of  Immortality.  They  are  and  they  must  vividly  realize  that  they are one Church with them.ʺ  C. H. PALMER.   

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/anglicanserbia1865/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

2 june newsletter w 72%

GATTON GROUP Sunday 2nd June Sunday 9th June Wednesday 19th June Class Mass LAIDLEY GROUP Wednesday 12th June @3.15pm School Library Friday 21st June 9am Class Mass Please make sure you don’t let your child/ren miss these sessions, encourage them to attend and enjoy learning about the Sacrament of Eucharist.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2019/06/01/2junenewsletterw/

01/06/2019 www.pdf-archive.com

Newsletter Publication 2014-02-FINAL-small 70%

The DYM participants brought in over 100 passers-by who each lit a candle and spent some quiet time before the Blessed Sacrament exposed on the Altar.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/02/25/newsletter-publication-2014-02-final-small/

25/02/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

January-Calendar 70%

Gregory the Theologian 5:30 - 6:30pm Greek School 30 The Three Hierarchs 8:00am Orthros 9:00am Divine Liturgy 31 7 Sacrament 7:00pm Philoptochos Mtg.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/01/14/january-calendar/

14/01/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

early printed 01 64%

Usum in Ecclesia Perpetuun Impugnantes Parisiis Antonium Dezallier 1689 Alexandro’s Dissertation on the powers of the Sacrament of Confession.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/10/30/early-printed-01/

29/10/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

20180128 Bulletin 63%

*Wonderful, Merciful Savior We Come to the Table Prayer of Preparation The Lord’s Supper Prayer of Intercession We Respond To The Word and Sacrament *I Will Lift Up My Eyes We Receive God’s Blessing Benediction Postlude:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/01/30/20180128-bulletin/

30/01/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

Easter 4th Sunday May 3 2020 62%

My Jesus, I believe that you are truly present in the Blessed Sacrament of the Altar.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2020/05/03/easter-4th-sunday-may-3-2020/

03/05/2020 www.pdf-archive.com

May 10^J 2020 Sunday Liturgy 61%

My Jesus, I believe that you are truly present in the Blessed Sacrament of the Altar.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2020/05/10/may-10j-2020-sunday-liturgy/

10/05/2020 www.pdf-archive.com

Easter 3rd Sunday April 26 2020 61%

My Jesus, I believe that you are truly present in the Blessed Sacrament of the Altar.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2020/04/26/easter-3rd-sunday-april-26-2020/

26/04/2020 www.pdf-archive.com

Schreyer Year of Faith Reflection 61%

Year of Faith – A Reflection for St.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2013/03/01/schreyer-year-of-faith-reflection/

01/03/2013 www.pdf-archive.com

Pentecost 2 June 14 2020 61%

My Jesus, I believe that you are truly present in the Blessed Sacrament of the Altar.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2020/06/14/pentecost-2-june-14-2020/

14/06/2020 www.pdf-archive.com

emform 60%

EMERGENCY MEDICAL RELEASE FORM and PERMISSION FORM 2012-2013 ST.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2012/07/19/emform/

19/07/2012 www.pdf-archive.com

Ascension Day May 24 2020 59%

My Jesus, I believe that you are truly present in the Blessed Sacrament of the Altar.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2020/05/23/ascension-day-may-24-2020/

23/05/2020 www.pdf-archive.com

Easter 6th Sunday May 17 2020 58%

My Jesus, I believe that you are truly present in the Blessed Sacrament of the Altar.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2020/05/17/easter-6th-sunday-may-17-2020/

17/05/2020 www.pdf-archive.com