Search


PDF Archive search engine
Last database update: 13 May at 15:25 - Around 76000 files indexed.


Show results per page

Results for «sacraments»:


Total: 50 results - 0.07 seconds

pre1924ecumenism8eng 100%

Orthodox Bishop Raphael Hawaweeny Accepted the Mysteries  of the Anglicans In 1910 and Then Changed His Mind in 1912.  He Was Not Judged By Any Council For This Mistake. Did He  and His Flock Lose Grace During Those Two Years?    His  Grace,  the  Right  Reverend  [Saint]  Raphael  Hawaweeny,  late  Bishop of Brooklyn and head of the Syrian Greek Orthodox Catholic Mission  of  the  Russian  Church  in  North  America,  was  a  far‐sighted  leader.  Called  from  Russia  to  New  York  in  1895,  to  assume  charge  of  the  growing  Syrian  parishes  under  the  Russian  jurisdiction  over  American  Orthodoxy,  he  was  elevated  to  the  episcopate  by  order  of  the  Holy  Synod  of  Russia  and  was  consecrated  Bishop  of  Brooklyn  and  head  of  the  Syrian  Mission  by  Archbishop  Tikhon  and  Bishop  Innocent  of  Alaska  on  March  12,  1904.  This  was the first consecration of an Orthodox Catholic Bishop in the New World  and  Bishop  Raphael  was  the  first  Orthodox  prelate  to  spend  his  entire  episcopate, from consecration to burial, in America. [Ed. note—In August 1988  the  remains  of  Bishop  Raphael  along  with  those  of  Bishops  Emmanuel  and  Sophronios  and  Fathers  Moses  Abouhider,  Agapios  Golam  and  Makarios  Moore  were  transferred  to  the  Antiochian  Village  in  southwestern  Pennsylvania  for  re‐burial.  Bishop  Raphaelʹs  remains  were  found  to  be  essentially incorrupt. As a result a commission under the direction of Bishop  Basil (Essey) of the Antiochian Archdiocese was appointed to gather materials  concerning the possible glorification of Bishop Raphael.]    With  his  broad  culture  and  international  training  and  experience  Bishop  Raphael  naturally  had  a  keen  interest  in  the  universal  Orthodox  aspiration  for  Christian  unity.  His  work  in  America,  where  his  Syrian  communities  were  widely  scattered  and  sometimes  very  small  and  without  the  services  of  the  Orthodox  Church,  gave  him  a  special  interest  in  any  movement which promised to provide a way by which acceptable and valid  sacramental  ministrations  might  be  brought  within  the  reach  of  isolated  Orthodox  people.  It  was,  therefore,  with  real  pleasure  and  gratitude  that  Bishop  Raphael  received  the  habitual  approaches  of  ʺHigh  Churchʺ  prelates  and  clergy  of  the  Episcopal  Church.  Assured  by  ʺcatholic‐mindedʺ  Protestants, seeking the recognition of real Catholic Bishops, that the Anglican  Communion and Episcopal Church were really Catholic and almost the same  as  Orthodox,  Bishop  Raphael  was  filled  with  great  happiness.  A  group  of  these  ʺHigh  Episcopalianʺ  Protestants  had  formed  the  American  branch  of  ʺThe  Anglican  and  Eastern  Orthodox  Churches  Unionʺ  (since  revised  and  now  existing  as  ʺThe  Anglican  and  Eastern  Churches  Association,ʺ  chiefly  active  in  England,  where  it  publishes  a  quarterly  organ  called  The  Christian  East).  This  organization,  being  well  pleased  with  the  impression  its  members  had  made  upon  Bishop  Raphael,  elected  him  Vice‐President  of  the  Union.  Bishop  Raphael  accepted,  believing  that  he  was  associating  himself with truly Catholic but unfortunately separated [from the Church]  fellow priests and  bishops in  a movement that  would promote  Orthodoxy  and true catholic unity at the same time.    As is their usual custom with all prelates and clergy of other bodies,  the  Episcopal  bishop  urged  Bishop  Raphael  to  recognize  their  Orders  and  accept  for  his  people  the  sacramental  ministrations  of  their  Protestant  clergy on  a basis of equality with the Sacraments of the Orthodox Church  administered  by  Orthodox  priests.  It  was  pointed  out  that  the  isolated  and  widely‐scattered  Orthodox  who  had  no  access  to  Orthodox  priests  or  Sacraments could be easily reached by clergy of the Episcopal Church, who,  they persuaded Bishop Raphael to believe, were priests and Orthodox in their  doctrine  and  belief  though  separated  in  organization.  In  this  pleasant  delusion, but under carefully specified restrictions, Bishop Raphael issued  in  1910  permission  for  his  faithful,  in  emergencies  and  under  necessity  when  an  Orthodox  priest  and  Sacraments  were  inaccessible,  to  ask  the  ministrations  of  Episcopal  clergy  and  make  comforting  use  of  what  these  clergy could provide in the absence of Orthodox priests and Sacraments.    Being Vice‐President of the Eastern Orthodox side of the Anglican and  Orthodox Churches Union and having issued on Episcopal solicitation such a  permission  to  his  people,  Bishop  Raphael  set  himself  to  observe  closely  the  reaction  following  his  permissory  letter  and  to  study  more  carefully  the  Episcopal Church and Anglican teaching in the hope that the Anglicans might  really  be  capable  of  becoming  actually  Orthodox.  But,  the  more  closely  he  observed  the  general  practice  and  the  more  deeply  he  studied  the  teaching  and faith of the Episcopal Church, the more painfully shocked, disappointed,  and  disillusioned  Bishop  Raphael  became.  Furthermore,  the  very  fact  of  his  own  position  in  the  Anglican  and  Orthodox  Union  made  the  confusion  and  deception of Orthodox people the more certain and serious. The existence and  cultivation  of  even  friendship  and  mutual  courtesy  was  pointed  out  as  supporting  the  Episcopal  claim  to  Orthodox  sacramental  recognition  and  intercommunion.  Bishop  Raphael  found  that  his  association  with  Episcopalians  became  the  basis  for  a  most  insidious,  injurious,  and  unwarranted  propaganda  in  favor  of  the  Episcopal  Church  among  his  parishes  and  faithful.  Finally,  after  more  than  a  year  of  constant  and  careful  study and observation, Bishop Raphael felt that it was his duty to resign from  the  association  of  which  he  was  Vice‐President.  In  doing  this  he  hoped  that  the  end  of  his  connection  with  the  Union  would  end  also  the  Episcopal  interferences and uncalled‐for intrusions in the affairs and religious harmony  of  his  people.  His  letter  of  resignation  from  the  Anglican  and  Orthodox  Churches  Union,  published  in  the  Russian  Orthodox  Messenger,  February  18,  1912, stated his convictions in the following way:    I have a personal opinion about the usefulness of the Union. Study has  taught me that there is a vast difference between the doctrine, discipline, and  even  worship  of  the  Holy  Orthodox  Church  and  those  of  the  Anglican  Communion;  while,  on  the  other  hand,  experience  has  forced  upon  me  the  conviction that to promote courtesy and friendship, which seems to be the only  aim of the Union at present, not only amounts to killing precious time, at best,  but also is somewhat hurtful to the religious  and  ecclesiastical welfare of  the  Holy Orthodox Church in these United States.    Very many of the bishops of the Holy Orthodox Church at the present  time—and  especially  myself  have  observed  that  the  Anglican  Communion  is  associated  with  numerous  Protestant  bodies,  many  of  whose  doctrines  and  teachings, as well as practices, are condemned by the Holy Orthodox Church. I  view  union  as  only  a  pleasing  dream.  Indeed,  it  is  impossible  for  the  Holy  Orthodox Church to receive—as She has a thousand times proclaimed, and as  even  the  Papal  See  of  Rome  has  declaimed  to  the  Holy  Orthodox  Churchʹs  credit—anyone into Her Fold or into union with Her who does not accept Her  Faith in full without any qualifications—the Faith which She claims is most  surely  Apostolic.  I  cannot  see  how  She  can  unite,  or  the  latter  expect  in  the  near future to unite with Her while the Anglican Communion holds so many  Protestant tenets and doctrines, and also is so closely associated with the non‐ Catholic religions about her.    Finally, I am in perfect accord with the views expressed by His Grace,  Archbishop  Platon,  in  his  address  delivered  this  year  before  the  Philadelphia  Episcopalian  Brotherhood,  as  to  the  impossibility  of  union  under  present  circumstances.    One would suppose that the publication of such a letter in the official  organ  of  the  Russian  Archdiocese  would  have  ended  the  misleading  and  subversive propaganda of the Episcopalians among the Orthodox faithful. But  the Episcopal members simply addressed a reply to Bishop Raphael in which  they  attempted  to  make  him  believe  that  the  Episcopal  Church  was  not  Protestant and had adopted none of the errors held by Protestant bodies. For  nearly  another  year  Bishop  Raphael  watched  and  studied  while  the  subversive  Episcopal propaganda  went  on among his people  on the basis  of  the letter of permission he had issued under a misapprehension of the nature  and teaching of the Episcopal Church and its clergy. Seeing that there was no  other means of protecting Orthodox faithful from being misled and deceived,  Bishop Raphael finally issued, late in 1912, the following pastoral letter which  has  remained  in  force  among  the  Orthodox  of  this  jurisdiction  in  America  ever  since  and  has  been  confirmed  and  reinforced  by  the  pronouncement  of  his successor, the present Archbishop Aftimios.  Pastoral Letter of Bishop Raphael  To  My  Beloved  Clergy  and  Laity  of  the  Syrian  Greek‐Orthodox  Catholic Church in North America:  Greetings in Christ Jesus, Our Incarnate Lord and God.  My Beloved Brethren:  Two  years  ago,  while  I was  Vice‐President  and  member  of  the  Anglican  and  Eastern  Orthodox  Churches  Union,  being  moved  with  compassion  for  my  children  in  the  Holy  Orthodox  Faith  once  delivered  to  the  saints  (Jude  1:3),  scattered  throughout  the  whole  of  North  America  and  deprived  of  the  ministrations  of  the  Church;  and  especially  in  places  far  removed  from  Orthodox  centers;  and  being  equally  moved  with  a  feeling  that  the  Episcopalian  (Anglican)  Church  possessed  largely  the  Orthodox  Faith,  as  many of the prominent clergy professed the same to me before I studied deeply  their doctrinal authorities and their liturgy—the Book of Common Prayer—I  wrote a letter as Bishop and Head of the Syrian‐Orthodox Mission in North  America,  giving  permission,  in  which  I  said  that  in  extreme  cases,  where  no  Orthodox priest could be called upon at short notice, the ministrations of the  Episcopal (Anglican) clergy might be kindly requested. However, I was most  explicit  in defining when  and how the  ministrations should be accepted,  and  also what exceptions should be made. In writing that letter I hoped, on the one  hand, to help my people spiritually, and, on the other hand, to open the way  toward  bringing  the  Anglicans  into  the  communion  of  the  Holy  Orthodox  Faith.  On  hearing  and  in  reading  that  my  letter,  perhaps  unintentionally,  was  misconstrued by some of the Episcopalian (Anglican) clergy, I wrote a second  letter  in  which  I  pointed  out  that  my  instructions  and  exceptions  had  been  either overlooked or ignored by many, to wit:  a)  They  (the  Episcopalians)  informed  the  Orthodox  people  that  I  recognized  the Anglican Communion (Episcopal Church) as being united with the Holy  Orthodox Church and their ministry, that is holy orders, as valid.  b) The Episcopal (Anglican) clergy offered their ministrations even when my  Orthodox clergy were residing in the same towns and parishes, as pastors.  c) Episcopal clergy said that there was no need of the Orthodox people seeking  the  ministrations  of  their  own  Orthodox  priests,  for  their  (the  Anglican)  ministrations were all that were necessary.  I,  therefore, felt bound  by  all  the  circumstances  to  make  a  thorough  study  of  the Anglican Churchʹs faith and orders, as well as of her discipline and ritual.  After serious consideration I realized that it was my honest duty, as a member  of the College of the Holy Orthodox Greek Apostolic Church, and head of the  Syrian Mission in North America, to  resign from the  vice‐presidency of  and  membership in the Anglican and  Eastern  Orthodox Churches  Union.  At  the  same time, I set forth, in my letter of resignation, my reason for so doing.  I  am  convinced  that  the  doctrinal  teaching  and  practices,  as  well  as  the  discipline,  of  the  whole  Anglican  Church  are  unacceptable  to  the  Holy  Orthodox  Church.  I  make  this apology  for  the Anglicans  whom  as  Christian  gentlemen  I  greatly  revere,  that  the  loose  teaching  of  a  great  many  of  the  prominent Anglican theologians are so hazy in their definitions of truths, and  so  inclined  toward  pet  heresies  that  it  is  hard  to  tell  what  they  believe.  The  Anglican  Church  as  a  whole  has  not  spoken  authoritatively  on  her  doctrine.  Her  Catholic‐minded  members  can  call  out  her  doctrines  from  many  views,  but  so  nebulous  is her pathway in the doctrinal world that those  who would  extend a hand of both Christian and ecclesiastical fellowship dare not, without  distrust,  grasp  the  hand  of  her  theologians,  for  while  many  are  orthodox  on  some  points,  they  are  quite  heterodox  on  others.  I  speak,  of  course,  from  the  Holy  Orthodox  Eastern  Catholic  point  of  view.  The  Holy  Orthodox  Church  has never perceptibly changed from Apostolic times, and, therefore, no one can  go astray in finding out what She teaches. Like Her Lord and Master, though  at times surrounded with human malaria—which He in His mercy pardons— She is the same yesterday, and today, and forever (Heb. 13:8) the mother and  safe deposit of the truth as it is in Jesus (cf. Eph. 4:21).  The  Orthodox  Church  differs  absolutely  with  the  Anglican  Communion  in  reference  to  the  number  of  Sacraments  and  in  reference  to  the  doctrinal  explanation of the same. The Anglicans say in their Catechism concerning the  Sacraments that there are ʺtwo only as generally necessary to salvation, that  is to say, Baptism and the Supper of the Lord.ʺ I am well aware that, in their  two books of homilies (which are not of a binding authority, for the books were  prepared only in the reign of Edward VI and Queen Elizabeth for priests who  were not permitted to preach their own sermons in England during times both  politically  and  ecclesiastically  perilous),  it  says  that  there  are  ʺfive  others  commonly  called  Sacramentsʺ  (see  homily  in  each  book  on  the  Sacraments),  but long since they have repudiated in different portions of their Communion  this very teaching and absolutely disavow such definitions in their ʺArticles of 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/pre1924ecumenism8eng/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

cyprus 97%

Since clerics coming from these Churches into the bosom of the Orthodox Church are received without reordination we express our judgment that this should also hold in the case of Anglicans – excluding intercommunio (sacramental union), by which one might receive the sacraments indiscriminately at the hands of an Anglican, even one holding the Orthodox dogma, until the dogmatic unity of the two Churches, Orthodox and Anglican, is attained.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/cyprus/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

Program 5-3 97%

Announcements Appointments with the Bishop:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/05/03/program-5-3/

03/05/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

A Overview of Catholicism 91%

CREED SACRAMENTS COMMANDMENTS Signs of God’s Life/Love 4.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/02/07/a-overview-of-catholicism/

07/02/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

contracerycii02 87%

BELIEF THAT ONE IS MADE “WORTHY” BY THEIR OWN  WORKS RATHER THAN THE MYSTERIES IS PELAGIANISM    Pelagius  (c.  354‐420)  was  a  heretic  from  Britain,  who  believed  that  it  was  possible  for  man  to  be  worthy  or  even  perfect  by  way  of  his  free  will,  without the necessity of grace. In most cases, Pelagius reverted from this strict  form  and  did  not  profess  it.  For  this  reason,  many  of  the  councils  called  to  condemn the false teaching, only condemn the heresy of Pelagianism, but do  not  condemn  Pelagius  himself.  But  various  councils  actually  do  condemn  Pelagius along with Pelagianism. Various Protestants have tried to disparage  the  Orthodox  Faith  by  calling  its  beliefs  Pelagian  or  Semipelagian.  But  the  Orthodox  Faith  is  neither  the  one,  nor  the  other,  but  is  entirely  free  from  Pelagianism.  The  Orthodox  Faith  is  also  free  from  the  opposite  extreme,  namely, Manicheanism, which believes that the world is inherently evil from  its very creation. The Orthodox Faith is the Royal Path. It neither falls to the  right nor to the left, but remains on the straight path, that is, “the Way.” The  Orthodox  Faith does  indeed  believe  that good  works are  essential, but these  are for the purpose of gaining God’s mercy. By no means can mankind grant  himself  “worthiness”  and  “perfection”  by  way  of  his  own  works.  It  is  only  through God’s uncreated grace, light, powers and energies, that mankind can  truly be granted worthiness and perfection in Christ.    The most commonly‐available source of God’s grace within the Church  is through the Holy Mysteries, particularly the Mysteries of Baptism, Chrism,  Absolution and Communion, which are necessary for salvation. Baptism can  only be received once, for it is a reconciliation of the fallen man to the Risen  Man,  where  one  no  longer  shares  in  the  nakedness  of  Adam  but  becomes  clothed with Christ. Chrism can be repeated whenever an Orthodox Christian  lapses into schism or heresy and is being reconciled to the Church. Absolution  can also serve as a method of reconciliation from the sin of heresy or schism  as well as from any personal sin that an Orthodox Christian may commit, and  in receiving the prayer of pardon one is reconciled to the Church. For as long  as  an  Orthodox  Christian  sins,  he  must  receive  this  Mystery  repeatedly  in  order to prepare himself for the next Mystery. Communion is reconciliation to  the  Immaculate  Body  and  Precious  Blood  of  Christ,  allowing  one  to  live  in  Christ. This is the ultimate Mystery, and must be received frequently for one  to experience a life in Christ. For Orthodox Christianity is not a philosophy or  a way of thought, nor is it merely a moral code, but it is the Life of Christ in  man, and the way one can truly live in Christ is through Holy Communion.    Pelagianism in the strictest form is the belief that mankind can achieve  “worthiness” and “perfection” by way of his own free will, without the need  of  God’s  grace  or  the  Mysteries  to  be  the  source  of  that  worthiness  and  perfection. Rather than viewing good works as a method of achieving God’s  mercy,  they  view  the  good  works  as  a  method  of  achieving  self‐worth  and  self‐perfection. The most common understanding of Pelagianism refers to the  supposed “worthiness” of man by way of having a good will or good works  prior  to  receiving  the  Mystery  of  Baptism.  But  the  form  of  Pelagianism  into  which  Bp.  Kirykos  falls  in  his  first  letter  to  Fr.  Pedro,  is  in  regards  to  the  supposed  “worthiness”  of  Christians  purely  by  their  own  work  of  fasting.  Thus, in his first letter to Fr. Pedro, Bp. Kirykos does not mention the Mystery  of  Confession  (or  Absolution)  anywhere  in  the  text  as  a  means  of  receiving  worthiness,  but  attaches  the  worthiness  entirely  to  the  fasting  alone.  Again,  nowhere in the letter does he mention the Holy Communion itself as a source  of  perfection,  but  rather  entertains  the  notion  that  mankind  is  capable  of  achieving such perfection prior to even receiving communion. This is the only  way  one  can  interpret  his  letter,  especially  his  totally  unhistorical  statement  regarding the early Christians, in which he claims: “They fasted in the fine and  broader sense, that is, they were worthy to commune.”    St. Aurelius Augustinus, otherwise known as St. Augustine of Hippo  (+28 August, 430), writes: “It is not by their works, but by grace, that the doers  of the law are justified… Now [the Apostle Paul] could not mean to contradict himself  in  saying,  ‘The  doers  of  the  law  shall  be  justified  (Romans  2:13),’  as  if  their  justification came through their works, and not through grace; since he declares that a  man  is  justified  freely  by  His  grace  without  the  works  of  the  law  (Romans  3:24,28)   intending  by  the  term  ‘freely’  nothing  else  than  that  works  do  not  precede  justification.  For  in  another  passage  he  expressly  says,  ‘If  by  grace,  then  is  it  no  more of works; otherwise grace is no longer grace (Romans 11:6).’ But the statement  that ‘the doers of the law shall be justified (Romans 2:13)’ must be so understood, as  that  we  may  know  that  they  are  not  otherwise  doers  of  the  law,  unless  they  be  justified, so that justification does not subsequently accrue to them as doers of the law,  but  justification  precedes  them  as  doers  of  the  law.  For  what  else  does  the  phrase  ‘being justified’ signify than being made righteous,—by Him, of course, who justifies  the ungodly man, that he may become a godly one instead? For if we were to express a  certain  fact  by  saying,  ‘The  men  will  be  liberated,’  the  phrase  would  of  course  be  understood  as  asserting  that  the  liberation  would  accrue  to  those  who  were  men  already;  but  if  we  were  to  say,  The  men  will  be  created,  we  should  certainly  not  be  understood as asserting that the creation would happen to those who were already in  existence,  but  that  they  became  men  by  the  creation  itself.  If  in  like  manner  it  were  said, The doers of the law shall be honoured, we should only interpret the statement  correctly  if  we  supposed  that  the  honour  was  to  accrue  to  those  who  were  already  doers of the law: but when the allegation is, ‘The doers of the law shall be justified,’  what else does it mean than that the just shall be justified? for of course the doers of  the law are just persons. And thus it amounts to the same thing as if it were said,  The doers of the law shall be created,—not those who were so already, but that they  may  become  such;  in  order  that  the  Jews  who  were  hearers  of  the  law  might  hereby  understand that they wanted the grace of the Justifier, in order to be able to become its  doers also. Or else the term ‘They shall be justified’ is used in the sense of, They shall  be deemed, or reckoned as just, as it is predicated of a certain man in the Gospel, ‘But  he,  willing  to  justify  himself  (Luke  10:29),’—meaning  that  he  wished  to  be  thought  and  accounted  just.  In  like  manner,  we  attach  one  meaning  to  the  statement,  ‘God  sanctifies  His  saints,’  and  another  to  the  words,  ‘Sanctified  be  Thy  name (Matthew 6:9);’  for in the former case we suppose the words to mean that He  makes those to be saints who were not saints before, and in the latter, that the  prayer  would  have  that  which  is  always  holy  in  itself  be  also  regarded  as  holy  by  men,—in  a  word,  be  feared  with  a  hallowed  awe.”  (Augustine  of  Hippo,  Antipelagian Writings, Chapter 45)    Thus the doers of the law are justified by God’s grace and not by their  own good works. The purpose of their own good works is to obtain the mercy  of  God,  but  it  is  God’s  grace  through  the  Holy  Mysteries  that  bestows  the  worthiness  and  perfection  upon  mankind.  Blessed  Augustine  does  not  only  speak  of  this  in  regards  to  the  Mystery  of  Baptism, but  applies  it  also  to  the  Mystery of Communion. Thus he writes of both Mysteries as follows:     “Now  [the  Pelagians]  take  alarm  from  the  statement  of  the  Lord,  when  He  says,  ‘Except  a  man  be  born  again,  he  cannot  see  the  kingdom  of  God  (John  3:3);’  because in His own explanation of the passage He affirms, ‘Except a man be born of  water and of the Spirit, he cannot enter into the kingdom of God (John 3:5).’ And so  they  try to ascribe to unbaptized  infants, by the  merit  of  their innocence, the gift of  salvation  and  eternal  life,  but  at the  same  time,  owing  to  their  being  unbaptized,  to  exclude them from the kingdom of heaven. But how novel and astonishing is such  an  assumption,  as  if  there  could  possibly  be  salvation  and  eternal  life  without heirship with Christ, without the kingdom of heaven! Of course they  have  their  refuge,  whither  to  escape  and  hide  themselves,  because  the  Lord  does  not  say,  Except  a  man  be  born  of  water  and  of  the  Spirit,  he  cannot  have  life,  but—‘he  cannot  enter  into  the  kingdom  of  God.’  If  indeed  He  had  said  the  other,  there  could  have  risen  not  a  moment’s  doubt.  Well,  then,  let  us  remove  the  doubt;  let  us  now  listen to the Lord, and not to men’s notions and conjectures; let us, I say, hear what  the Lord says—not indeed concerning the sacrament of the laver, but concerning the  sacrament of His own holy table, to which none but a baptized person has a right  to approach: ‘Except ye eat my flesh and drink my blood, ye shall have no life  in you  (John  6:53).’ What do we want more? What  answer  to  this can be  adduced,  unless it be by that obstinacy which ever resists the constancy of manifest truth?” (op.  cit., Chapter 26)    Blessed  Augustine  continues  on  the  same  subject  of  how  the  early  Orthodox  Christians  of  Carthage  perceived  the  Mysteries  of  Baptism  and  Communion:  “The  Christians  of  Carthage  have  an  excellent  name  for  the  sacraments,  when  they  say  that  baptism  is  nothing  else  than  ‘salvation,’  and  the  sacrament of the body of Christ nothing else than ‘life.’ Whence, however, was  this derived, but from that primitive, as I suppose, and apostolic tradition, by which  the Churches of Christ maintain it to be an inherent principle, that without baptism  and partaking of the supper of the Lord it is impossible for any man to attain either to  the kingdom of God or to salvation and everlasting life? So much also does Scripture  testify,  according  to  the  words  which  we  already  quoted.  For  wherein  does  their  opinion, who designate baptism by the term salvation, differ from what is written: ‘He  saved us by the washing of regeneration (Titus 3:5)?’ or from Peter’s statement: ‘The  like figure whereunto even baptism doth also now save us (1 Peter 3:21)?’ And what  else do they say who call the sacrament of the Lord’s Supper ‘life,’ than that  which is written: ‘I am the living  bread which came down from heaven (John  6:51);’  and  ‘The  bread  that  I  shall  give  is  my  flesh,  for  the  life  of  the  world  (John  6:51);’  and  ‘Except  ye  eat  the  flesh  of  the  Son  of  man,  and  drink  His  blood, ye shall have no life in you (John 6:53)?’ If, therefore, as so many and such  divine  witnesses  agree,  neither  salvation  nor  eternal  life  can  be  hoped  for  by  any man without baptism and the Lord’s body and blood, it is vain to promise  these blessings to infants without them. Moreover, if it be only sins that separate man  from salvation and eternal life, there is nothing else in infants which these sacraments  can be the means of removing, but the guilt of sin,—respecting which guilty nature it  is written, that “no one is clean, not even if his life be only that of a day (Job  14:4).’ Whence also that exclamation of the Psalmist: ‘Behold, I was conceived in  iniquity; and in sins did my mother bear me (Psalm 50:5)! This is either said in  the  person of our common  humanity, or if of  himself  only David speaks,  it does  not  imply that he was born of fornication, but in lawful wedlock. We therefore ought not  to doubt that even for infants yet to be baptized was that precious blood shed, which  previous to its actual effusion was so given, and applied in the sacrament, that it was  said, ‘This is my blood, which shall be shed for many for the remission of sins  (Matthew 26:28).’  Now they who will not allow that they are under sin, deny that  there is any liberation. For what is there that men are liberated from, if they are held  to be bound by no bondage of sin? (op. cit., Chapter 34)    Now, what of Bp. Kirykos’ opinion that early Christians “fasted in the  fine  and  broader  sense,  that  is,  they  were  worthy  to  commune?”  Is  this  because  they  were  saints?  Were  all  of  the  early  Christians  who  were  frequent  communicants ascetics who fasted “in the finer and broader sense” and were  actual  saints?  Even  if  so,  does  the  Orthodox  Church  consider  the  saints  “worthy” by their act of fasting, or is their act of fasting only a plea for God’s  mercy,  while  God’s  grace  is  what  delivers  the  worthiness?  According  to  Bp.  Kirykos,  the  early  Christians,  whether they  were  saints or  not, “fasted in  the  fine  and  broader  sense,  that  is,  they  were  worthy  to  commune.”  But  is  this  a  teaching  of  Orthodoxy  or  rather  of  Pelagianism?  Is  this  what  the  saints  believed  of  themselves,  that  they  were  “worthy?”  And  if  they  didn’t  believe  they  were  worthy,  was  that  just  out  of  humility,  or  did  they  truly  consider  themselves unworthy? Blessed Augustine of Hippo, one of the champions of  his time against the heresy of Pelagianism, writes:    “In that, indeed, in the praise of the saints, they will not drive us with the zeal  of  that  publican  (Luke  18:10‐14)  to  hunger  and  thirst  after  righteousness,  but  with  the vanity of the Pharisees, as it were, to overflow with sufficiency and fulness; what  does  it  profit  them  that—in  opposition  to  the  Manicheans,  who  do  away  with  baptism—they  say  ‘that  men  are  perfectly  renewed  by  baptism,’  and  apply  the  apostle’s testimony for this,—‘who testifies that, by the washing of water, the Church  is made holy and spotless from the Gentiles (Ephesians 5:26),’—when, with a proud  and perverse meaning, they put forth their arguments in opposition to the prayers of  the Church itself. For they say this in order that the Church may be believed after holy  baptism—in which is accomplished the forgiveness of all sins—to have no further sin;  when, in opposition to them, from the rising of the sun even to its setting, in all  its members it cries to God, ‘Forgive us our debts (Matthew 6:12).’ But if they  are  interrogated  regarding  themselves  in  this  matter,  they  find  not  what  to  answer.  For if they should say that they have no sin, John answers them, that ‘they deceive  themselves, and the  truth  is not in them (1 John 1:8).’  But if they  confess their  sins, since they wish themselves to be members of Christ’s body, how will that body,  that  is,  the  Church,  be  even  in  this  time  perfectly,  as  they  think,  without  spot  or  wrinkle, if its members without falsehood confess themselves to have sins? Wherefore  in baptism all sins are forgiven, and, by that very washing of water in the word, the  Church is set forth in Christ without spot or wrinkle (Ephesians 5:27);  and unless it  were baptized, it would fruitlessly say, ‘Forgive us our debts,’ until it be brought to  glory, when there is in it absolutely no spot or wrinkle.” (op. cit., Chapter 17).    Again,  in  his  chapter  called  ‘The  Opinion  of  the  Saints  Themselves  About  Themselves,’  Blessed  Augustine  writes:  “It  is  to  be  confessed  that  ‘the  Holy Spirit, even in the old times,’ not only ‘aided good dispositions,’ which even they  allow, but that it even made them good, which they will not have. ‘That all, also, of the  prophets and apostles or saints, both evangelical and ancient, to whom God gives His  witness, were righteous, not in comparison with the wicked, but by the rule of virtue,’  is not doubtful. And this is opposed to the Manicheans, who blaspheme the patriarchs  and  prophets;  but  what  is  opposed  to  the  Pelagians  is,  that  all  of  these,  when  interrogated  concerning  themselves  while  they  lived  in  the  body,  with  one  most  accordant voice would answer, ‘If we should say that we have no sin, we deceive  ourselves, and the truth is not in us (1 John 1:8).’ ‘But in the future time,’ it is  not to be denied ‘that there will be a reward as well of good works as of evil, and that  no  one  will  be  commanded  to  do  the  commandments  there  which  here  he  has  contemned,’  but  that  a  sufficiency  of  perfect  righteousness  where  sin  cannot  be,  a  righteousness which is here hungered and thirsted after by the saints, is here hoped for 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/contracerycii02/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

Aquinas on Romans 87%

Second, in the sacraments which communicate it:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/03/14/aquinas-on-romans/

14/03/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

DEA-Petition 83%

The sacraments, those sacred mixtures of matter and the Holy Spirit, fulfill that need.” From:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/02/06/dea-petition/

06/02/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

PDF Letter 78%

“…It is not possible to be silent about the abuses, even quite grave ones, against the nature of the Liturgy and the Sacraments as well as the tradition and the authority of the Church, which in our day not infrequently plague liturgical celebrations in one ecclesial environment or another” (RS 4).

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/05/04/pdf-letter/

04/05/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

December 15, 2013 Bulletin 77%

Monday, Wednesday, Friday (SA) Tuesday, Thursday (IC) 8:30 AM or as announced We are most desirous to make the celebration of the sacraments a joyous, spiritual event in your life and within the parish.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2013/12/13/december-15-2013-bulletin/

13/12/2013 www.pdf-archive.com

Paul Chehade - Summaries of World Religions. 75%

God's grace is conveyed through seven Sacraments, especially the Eucharist, or Communion, celebrated at Mass-the regular worship service.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/05/06/paul-chehade-summaries-of-world-religions/

06/05/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

January-Calendar 70%

Greek Orthodox Church of St.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/01/14/january-calendar/

14/01/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

early printed 01 64%

As well as refuting Protestant heresies, it clarified the Churches teaching in matters of Salvation, the Biblical Canon, and the Sacraments.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/10/30/early-printed-01/

29/10/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

Schreyer Year of Faith Reflection 61%

She gives us the sacraments, especially the sacraments of Penance and Eucharist for the same reason.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2013/03/01/schreyer-year-of-faith-reflection/

01/03/2013 www.pdf-archive.com

emform 60%

Seniors) application at Parish Office __Usher __CYO Boys and Girls Basketball __Youth Choir __Youth Board __Singing __Famine Experience __Instrument (what)_________ __Washington DC March for Life Trip __Serving __CYO Girls Vollyball Please mark the sacraments you have received:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2012/07/19/emform/

19/07/2012 www.pdf-archive.com