Search


PDF Archive search engine
Last database update: 26 January at 23:02 - Around 76000 files indexed.


Show results per page

Results for «sanctification»:


Total: 35 results - 0.121 seconds

contracerycii06 78%

FROM THE ANAPHORAE OF THE ANCIENT CHURCH  REGARDING “WORTHINESS” OF HOLY COMMUNION    This  can  also  be  demonstrated  by  the  secret  prayers  within  Divine  Liturgy.  From  the  early  Apostolic  Liturgies,  right  down  to  the  various  Liturgies  of  the  Local  Churches  of  Jerusalem,  Antioch,  Alexandria,  Constantinople,  Rome,  Gallia,  Hispania,  Britannia,  Cappadocia,  Armenia,  Persia, India and Ethiopia, in Liturgies that were once vibrant in the Orthodox  Church,  prior  to  the  Nestorian,  Monophysite  and  Papist  schisms,  as  well  as  those  Liturgies  still  in  common  use  today  among  the  Orthodox  Christians  (namely,  the  Liturgies  of  St.  John  Chrysostom,  St.  Basil  the  Great  and  the  Presanctified Liturgy of St. Gregory the Dialogist), the message is quite clear  in all the mystic prayers that the clergy and the laity are referred to as entirely  unworthy, and truly they are to believe they are unworthy, and that no action  of  their  own can make them worthy  (i.e.  not  even  fasting), but  that  only the  Lord’s  mercy  and  grace  through  the  Gifts  themselves  will  allow  them  to  receive communion without condemnation. To demonstrate this, let us begin  with the early Apostolic Liturgies, and from there work our way through as  many of the oblations used throughout history, as have been found in ancient  manuscripts, among them those still offered within Orthodoxy today.    St.  James  the  Brother‐of‐God  (+23  October,  62),  First  Bishop  of  Jerusalem, begins his anaphora as follows: “O Sovereign Lord our God, condemn  me  not,  defiled with a multitude  of sins: for,  behold, I  have  come to  this Thy divine  and heavenly mystery, not as being worthy; but looking only to Thy goodness, I direct  my voice to Thee: God be merciful to me, a sinner; I have sinned against Heaven,  and before Thee, and am unworthy to come into the presence of this Thy holy  and spiritual table, upon which Thy only‐begotten Son, and our Lord Jesus Christ,  is mystically set forth as a sacrifice for me, a sinner, and stained with every spot.”     Following the creed, the following prayer is read: “God and Sovereign of  all, make us, who are unworthy, worthy of this hour, lover of mankind; that  being  pure  from  all  deceit  and  all  hypocrisy,  we  may  be  united  with  one  another  by  the  bond  of  peace  and  love,  being  confirmed  by  the  sanctification  of  Thy divine knowledge through Thine only‐begotten Son, our Lord and Saviour Jesus  Christ,  with  whom  Thou  art  blessed,  together  with  Thy  all‐holy,  and  good,  and  quickening Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.”     Then  right  before  the  clergy  are  to  partake  of  Communion,  the  following is recited: “O Lord our God, the heavenly bread, the life of the universe, I  have  sinned  against  Heaven,  and  before  Thee,  and  am  not  worthy  to  partake  of  Thy  pure  Mysteries;  but  as  a  merciful  God,  make  me  worthy  by  Thy  grace,  without  condemnation  to  partake  of  Thy  holy  body  and  precious  blood,  for  the  remission of sins, and life everlasting.”     After all the clergy and laity have received Communion, this prayer is  read: “O God, who through Thy great and unspeakable love didst condescend  to  the  weakness  of  Thy  servants,  and  hast  counted  us  worthy  to  partake  of  this heavenly table, condemn not us sinners for the participation of Thy pure  Mysteries;  but  keep  us,  O  good  One,  in  the  sanctification  of  Thy  Holy  Spirit,  that  being made holy, we may find part and inheritance with all Thy saints that have been  well‐pleasing to Thee since the world began, in the light of Thy countenance, through  the  mercy  of  Thy  only‐begotten  Son,  our  Lord  and  God  and  Saviour  Jesus  Christ,  with  whom  Thou  art  blessed,  together  with  Thy  all‐holy,  and  good,  and  quickening  Spirit:  for  blessed  and  glorified  is  Thy  all‐precious  and  glorious  name,  Father,  Son,  and Holy Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages.”     From  these  prayers  is  it  not  clear  that  no  one  is  worthy  of  Holy  Communion, whether they have fasted or not, but that it is God’s mercy that  bestows  worthiness  upon  mankind  through  participation  in  the  Mystery  of  Confession  and  receiving  Holy  Communion?  This  was  most  certainly  the  belief  of  the  early  Christians  of  Jerusalem,  quite  contrary  to  Bp.  Kirykos’  ideology of early Christians supposedly being “worthy of communion” because  they supposedly “fasted in the finer and broader sense.”    St. Mark the Evangelist (+25 April, 63), First Bishop of Alexandria, in  his  Divine  Liturgy,  writes:  “O  Sovereign  and  Almighty  Lord,  look  down  from  heaven  on  Thy  Church,  on  all  Thy  people,  and  on  all  Thy  flock.  Save  us  all,  Thine  unworthy  servants,  the  sheep  of  Thy  fold.  Give  us  Thy  peace,  Thy  help,  and  Thy  love,  and  send  to  us  the  gift  of  Thy  Holy  Spirit,  that  with  a  pure  heart  and  a  good  conscience  we  may  salute  one  another  with  an  holy  kiss,  without  hypocrisy,  and  with no hostile purpose, but guileless and pure in one spirit, in the bond of peace  and love, one body and one spirit, in one faith, even as we have been called in one hope  of our calling, that we may all meet in the divine and boundless love, in Christ Jesus  our  Lord,  with  whom  Thou  art  blessed,  with  Thine  all‐holy,  good,  and  life‐creating  Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.”     Later in the Liturgy the following is read: “Be mindful also of us, O Lord,  Thy  sinful  and  unworthy  servants,  and  blot  out  our  sins  in  Thy  goodness  and  mercy.” Again we read: “O holy, highest, awe‐inspiring God, who dwellest among  the saints, sanctify us by the word of Thy grace and by the inspiration of Thy all‐ holy Spirit; for Thou hast said, O Lord our God, Be ye holy; for I am holy. O Word  of God, past finding out, consubstantial and co‐eternal with the Father and the Holy  Spirit,  and  sharer  of  their  sovereignty,  accept  the  pure  song  which  cherubim  and  seraphim, and the unworthy lips of Thy sinful and unworthy servant, sing aloud.”     Thus  it  is  clear  that  whether  he  had  fasted  or  not,  St.  Mark  and  his  clergy and flock still considered themselves unworthy. By no means did they  ever entertain the theory that “they fasted in the finer and broader sense, that is,  they were worthy of communion,” as Bp. Kirykos dares to say. On the contrary,  St. Mark and the early Christians of Alexandria believed any worthiness they  could achieve would be through partaking of the Holy Mysteries themselves.     Thus, St. Mark wrote the following prayer to be read immediately after  Communion: “O Sovereign Lord our God, we thank Thee that we have partaken of  Thy  holy,  pure,  immortal,  and  heavenly  Mysteries,  which  Thou  hast  given  for  our  good,  and  for  the  sanctification  and  salvation  of  our  souls  and  bodies.  We  pray  and  beseech Thee, O Lord, to grant in Thy good mercy, that by partaking of the holy  body and precious blood of Thine only‐begotten Son, we may have faith that  is not ashamed, love that is unfeigned, fullness of holiness, power to eschew  evil  and  keep  Thy  commandments,  provision  for  eternal  life,  and  an  acceptable defense before the awful tribunal of Thy Christ: Through whom and  with  whom be glory and power to Thee, with Thine  all‐holy, good,  and  life‐creating  Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.”    St. Peter the Apostle (+29 June, 67), First Bishop of Antioch, and later  Bishop  of  Old  Rome,  in  his  Divine  Liturgy,  writes:  “For  unto  Thee  do  I  draw  nigh, and, bowing my neck, I pray Thee: Turn not Thy countenance away from me,  neither cast me out from among Thy children, but graciously vouchsafe that I, Thy  sinful  and  unworthy  servant,  may  offer  unto  Thee  these  Holy  Gifts.”  Again  we  read:  “With  soul  defiled  and  lips  unclean,  with  base  hands  and  earthen  tongue,  wholly  in  sins,  mean  and  unrepentant,  I  beseech  Thee,  O  Lover  of  mankind, Saviour of the hopeless and Haven of those in danger, Who callest sinners  to repentance, O Lord God, loose, remit, forgive me a sinner my transgressions,  whether deliberate or unintentional, whether of word or deed, whether committed in  knowledge or in ignorance.”    St.  Thomas  the  Apostle  (+6  October,  72),  Enlightener  of  Edessa,  Mesopotamia, Persia, Bactria, Parthia and India, and First Bishop of Maliapor  in India, in his Divine Liturgy, conveyed through his disciples, St. Thaddeus  (+21  August,  66),  St.  Haggai  (+23  December,  87),  and  St.  Maris  (+5  August,  120), delivered the following prayer in the anaphora which is to be read while  kneeling: “O our Lord and God, look not on the multitude of our sins, and let  not  Thy  dignity  be  turned  away  on  account  of  the  heinousness  of  our  iniquities; but through Thine unspeakable grace sanctify this sacrifice of Thine,  and grant through it power and capability, so that Thou mayest forget our many  sins, and be merciful when Thou shalt appear at the end of time, in the man whom  Thou  hast  assumed  from  among  us,  and  we  may  find  before  Thee  grace  and  mercy,  and be rendered worthy to praise Thee with spiritual assemblies.”     Upon  standing,  the  following  is  read:  “We  thank  Thee,  O  our  Lord  and  God, for the abundant riches of Thy grace to us: we who were sinful and degraded,  on account of the multitude of Thy clemency, Thou hast made worthy to celebrate  the holy Mysteries of the body and blood of Thy Christ. We beg aid from Thee for the  strengthening of our souls, that in perfect love and true faith we may administer Thy  gift  to  us.”  And  again:  “O  our  Lord  and  God,  restrain  our  thoughts,  that  they  wander  not  amid  the  vanities  of  this  world.  O  Lord  our  God,  grant  that  I  may  be  united to the affection of Thy love, unworthy though I be. Glory to Thee, O Christ.”     The priest then reads this prayer on behalf of the faithful: “O Lord God  Almighty,  accept  this  oblation  for  the  whole  Holy  Catholic  Church,  and  for  all  the  pious and righteous fathers who have been pleasing to Thee, and for all the prophets  and apostles, and for all the martyrs and confessors, and for all that mourn, that are  in straits, and are sick, and for all that are under difficulties and trials, and for all the  weak and the oppressed, and for all the dead that have gone from amongst us; then for  all that ask a prayer from our weakness, and for me, a degraded and feeble sinner.  O  Lord  our  God,  according  to  Thy  mercies  and  the  multitude  of  Thy  favours,  look  upon  Thy  people,  and  on  me,  a  feeble  man,  not  according  to  my  sins  and  my  follies,  but  that  they  may  become  worthy  of  the  forgiveness  of  their  sins  through  this  holy  body,  which  they  receive  with  faith,  through  the  grace  of  Thy mercy, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.”     The  following  prayer  also  indicates  that  the  officiators  consider  themselves unworthy but look for the reception of the Holy Mysteries to give  them remission of sins: “We, Thy degraded, weak, and feeble servants who are  congregated in Thy name, and now stand before Thee, and have received with joy the  form  which  is  from  Thee,  praising,  glorifying,  and  exalting,  commemorate  and  celebrate this great, awful, holy, and divine mystery of the passion, death, burial, and  resurrection of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ. And may Thy Holy Spirit come, O  Lord,  and  rest  upon  this  oblation  of  Thy  servants  which  they  offer,  and  bless  and  sanctify it; and may it be unto us, O Lord, for the propitiation of our offences and  the forgiveness of our sins, and for a grand hope of resurrection from the dead, and  for a new life in the Kingdom of the heavens, with all who have been pleasing before  Him.  And  on  account  of  the  whole  of  Thy  wonderful  dispensation  towards  us,  we  shall  render  thanks  unto  Thee,  and  glorify  Thee  without  ceasing  in  Thy  Church,  redeemed  by  the  precious  blood  of  Thy  Christ,  with  open  mouths  and  joyful  countenances:  Ascribing  praise,  honour,  thanksgiving,  and  adoration  to  Thy  holy,  loving, and life‐creating name, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.”     Finally, the following petition indicates quite clearly the belief that the  officiators  and  entire  congregation  are  unworthy  of  receiving  the  Mysteries:  “The  clemency  of  Thy  grace,  O  our  Lord  and  God,  gives  us  access  to  these  renowned, holy, life‐creating, and Divine Mysteries, unworthy though we be.”    St. Luke the Evangelist (+18 October, 86), Bishop of Thebes in Greece,  in  his  Divine  Liturgy,  writes:  “Bless,  O  Lord,  Thy  faithful  people  who  are  bowed  down  before  Thee;  deliver  us  from  injuries  and  temptations;  make  us  worthy  to  receive  these  Holy  Mysteries  in  purity  and  virtue,  and  may  we  be  absolved  and sanctified by them. We offer Thee praise and thanksgiving and to Thine Only‐ begotten  Son  and  to  Thy  Holy  Spirit,  now  and  ever,  and  unto  the  ages  of  ages.  Amen.”     St. Dionysius the Areopagite (+3 October, 96), Bishop of Athens, in his  Divine Liturgy, writes: “Giver of Holiness, and distributor of every good, O Lord,  Who  sanctifiest  every  rational  creature with  sanctification,  which  is from Thee;  sanctify,  through  Thy  Holy  Spirit,  us  Thy  servants,  who  bow  before  Thee;  free  us  from all servile passions of sin, from envy, treachery, deceit, hatred, enmities,  and  from  him,  who  works  the  same,  that  we  may  be  worthy,  holily  to  complete  the  ministry  of  these  life‐giving  Mysteries,  through  the  heavenly  Master, Jesus Christ, Thine Only‐begotten Son, through Whom, and with Whom, is  due to Thee, glory and honour, together with Thine All‐holy, Good and Life‐creating  Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.” Thus, it is God that offers  sanctification  to  mankind,  purifies  mankind  from  sins,  and  makes  mankind  worthy of the Mysteries. This worthiness is not achieved by fasting.    In  the  same  Anaphora  we  read:  “Essentially  existing,  and  from  all  ages;  Whose  nature  is  incomprehensible,  Who  art  near  and  present  to  all,  without  any  change of Thy sublimity; Whose goodness every existing thing longs for and desires;  the intelligible indeed, and creature endowed with intelligence, through intelligence;  those  endowed  with  sense,  through  their  senses;  Who,  although  Thou  art  One  essentially, nevertheless art present with us, and amongst us, in this hour, in which  Thou  hast  called  and  led  us  to  these  Thy  holy  Mysteries;  and  hast  made  us  worthy to stand before the sublime throne of Thy majesty, and to handle the sacred  vessels  of  Thy  ministry  with  our  impure  hands:  take  away  from  us,  O  Lord,  the  cloak of iniquity in which we are enfolded, as from Jesus, the son of Josedec the  High  Priest,  thou  didst  take  away  the  filthy  garments,  and  adorn  us  with  piety  and  justice,  as  Thou  didst  adorn  him  with  a  vestment  of  glory;  that  clothed  with  Thee  alone,  as  it  were  with  a  garment,  and  being  like  temples  crowned  with  glory, we may see Thee unveiled with a mind divinely illuminated, and may feast,  whilst  we,  by  communicating  therein,  enjoy  this  sacrifice  set  before  us;  and  that we may render to Thee glory and praise, together with Thine Only‐begotten Son,  and Thine All‐holy, Good and Life‐creating Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of  ages. Amen.” Once again, worthiness derives from God and not from fasting.    In the same Liturgy we read: “I invoke Thee, O God the Father, have mercy  upon us, and wash away, through Thy grace, the uncleanness of my evil deeds;  destroy, through Thy  mercy, what I have done, worthy of wrath; for I do not 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/contracerycii06/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

w E 18830200 77%

3:24, 25.) [Those who will study the chart in “ Food,” page 105, will be helped in the under­ standing of this subject.] YOUR SANCTIFICATION Order is indispensable in the study of the word of the God of order.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/08/04/w-e-18830200/

04/08/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

A Nominal Christian Or an Immature Believer 70%

worker or a seminarian telling the young people, Last February, along with Pastor Joon-Ghon Kim and “We must clearly differentiate between salvation and several others, I was invited to speak at ‘Jesus Army sanctification.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/03/15/a-nominal-christian-or-an-immature-believer/

15/03/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

The Book of Life 70%

May none oppress and disregard or mistake divinity, for their sanctification is not divine, even though it is as a result of reality.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/02/12/the-book-of-life/

12/02/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

communionpachomioseng 58%

THE FREQUENCY OF HOLY COMMUNION        By Elder Pachomius of Chios      Who  would  not  weep  at  the  ignorance  and  wretched  state  of  our  contemporary clergy?  Where has it ever been heard, that the Christians should  go to Church, seeking to receive Holy Communion, and the priests hinder them,  saying  to  them,  “Is  Communion  soup?    Forty  days  have  not  passed  since  you  received Holy Communion, and you come to receive again?”      In like manner, regarding the first week of the Great Lent, I know of many  men  and  women  who  keep  the  three‐day  fast  [an  optional  tradition  of  fasting  from  food  and  water],  and  they  go  to  church  on  Wednesday  for  the  Liturgy  of  the  Presanctified  Gifts,  and  the  clergy  do  not  allow  them  to  receive  Holy  Communion,  saying,  “Just  the  other  day  you  were  eating  meat,  and  today  you  come to receive Communion?”      “And secondly,” they say, “the Presanctified is for the priests, and not for  the  laity.”    Fie!    on  our  ignorance  and  lack  of  understanding!    You,  on  the  one  hand, O ordained man, are eating meat the night before, and many times you are  even  drunk,  and  perhaps  also  irreverent,  and  you  go  to  serve  the  Liturgy,  and  you  hinder  the  one  who  has  been  fasting  with  so  much  reverence?    And  you  deprive him of so much benefit and sanctification?      Do  you  see  what  lack  of  learning  our  priests  have?    “The  Presanctified,”  say they, “is for the priests, and not for the laypeople.”  St. Basil the Great says, “I  commune  my  parishioners  four  times  a  week.”    St.  John  Chrysostom  and  the  entire Church of Christ do likewise.  They had this custom of Communion four  times a week.  And since the Liturgy is not served during the weekdays in Great  Lent, the Holy Fathers in their wisdom devised to have the Presanctified, only so  that  the  Christians  might  have  the  opportunity  to  commune  during  the  week;  and you say the Presanctified is only for the ordained?      And  observe,  O  reader,  that  as  long  as  this  discipline  prevailed,  and  the  Christians communed frequently, their hearts were warmed by the grace of Holy  Communion, and they ran to martyrdom like sheep.      Therefore,  the  priests  who  hinder  the  Christians  from  receiving  the  Immaculate  Communion  should  know  well  that  they  sin  greatly.    I  do  not  say  that  the  people  should  commune  simply  and  indiscriminately,  but  that  they  should approach with the fitting preparation.      However, I heard what some priests say: “I” (say they) “am a priest and I  serve the Liturgy frequently, and I commune, but the layman does not have this  permission.”    In  this  matter,  O  priest,  my  brother,  you  are  greatly  mistaken.   Because, in the matter of Holy Communion, the priest differs in nothing from the  layman.  You, O priest, are a minister of the Mystery, but this does not mean that  you have the right to receive frequently, and the layman does not.  In this matter  I can bring you many proofs from the Saints, demonstrating that it is permitted  equally to bishops and priests and laypeople, both men and women, to partake  of  the  Immaculate  Mysteries  continuously  –  unless  they  have  been  married  a  third time.  As many as have married three times commune three times a year.      I  have  myriads  of  proofs  concerning  this  issue,  but  which  one  should  I  present to you first?  Chrysostom, Clement, Symeon of Thessalonica, David?  As  I said, which one should I mention first?  In this matter, I can bring you so many  proofs, I could fill a whole book!  For this cause, I cut short what I am saying and  tell  you  only  this  in  brief.    If  you  don’t  want  the  Christians  to  commune  frequently, why do you hold the Holy Chalice, and  display it to the Christians,  and  cry  out  from  the  Holy  Bema,  “With  the  fear  of  God,  faith,  and  love,  draw  near, and approach the Mysteries that you may commune?”  And yet again, you  yourselves  hinder  them,  and  you  lie  openly?    Why,  on  the  one  hand,  do  you  invite them, and, on the other, do you push them away?... 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/communionpachomioseng/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

contracerycii05 58%

FROM THE PRAYERS OF PREPARATION FOR COMMUNION  REGARDING “WORTHINESS” OF THE HOLY MYSTERIES    In the prayers for preparation for Holy Communion, written by several  different  Holy  Fathers,  we  find  the  repetition  of  this  belief  in  utter  unworthiness for Holy Communion, whether one has fasted or not. Note also,  that among the Fathers who wrote these prayers are St. Basil the Great and St.  John Chrysostom, the greatest luminaries among the Anatolian‐Cappadocian  Fathers. Yet these most awesome and splendid examples of sanctity, whether  they fasted “in the finer and broader sense,” as Metropolitan Kirykos calls it,  by  no  means  considered  themselves  “worthy  to  commune.”  For  it  is  not  abstaining from foods that make one worthy, but rather abstaining from sins,  and all men have sinned save Christ who alone is perfect, and save Theotokos  who  is  the  purest  temple  of  the  Lord  from  her  very  childhood,  but  was  hallowed, sanctified and consecrated by God at the hour of the Annunciation.  The rest of us are sinners, even the saints, but their holiness is owing to God’s  mercy upon them due to their purity of life, and their theosis is owing to the  grace of God that overshadowed them, as they lived every day in Christ.     The  fact that the saints were  not  worthy  in and of  themselves, but  by  the  grace  of  God,  can  be  well  understood  by  reading  their  prayers  of  preparation  for  Holy  Communion.  For  these  prayers  were  written  by  saints  who,  in  their  shortcomings,  were  also  sinners;  and  they  wrote  these  prayers  for  the  sake  of  sinners  who,  just  like  them,  strive  by  God’s  grace  to  become  saints. Thus, in the second troparion in the preparation for Holy Communion  we read: “How can I, the unworthy one, shamelessly dare to partake of Thy Holy  Gifts?”  In  the  last  few  troparia  in  the  service  of  preparation  for  Holy  Communion, we read: “Into the splendor of Thy Saints how shall I, the unworthy  one, enter?...” and again “O Man‐befriending Master, Lord Jesus my God, let not  these holy Gifts be unto me for judgment through mine unworthiness…”    St. Basil the Great (+ 1 January, 397), in his first prayer of preparation  for Holy Communion, writes: “… For I have sinned, O Lord, I have sinned against  Heaven  and  before  Thee,  and  I  am  not  worthy  to  gaze  upon  the  height  of  Thy  glory… Wherefore, though I am unworthy of both heaven and earth, and even of this  transient life…” In his second prayer we read: “I know, O Lord, that I partake of  Thine immaculate Body and precious Blood unworthily, and that I am guilty, and  eat and drink judgment to myself, not discerning the Body and Blood of Thee, my  Christ and God…”     St.  John  Chrysostom  (+14  September,  407),  in  his  first  prayer  of  preparation  for  Holy  Communion,  writes:  “O  Lord  my  God,  I  know  that  I  am  not worthy, nor sufficient, that Thou shouldest come under the roof of the house of  my soul, for all is desolate and fallen, and Thou hast not in me a place worthy to  lay Thy head…” In his third prayer we read: “O Lord Jesus Christ my God, loose,  remit,  forgive,  and  pardon  the  failings,  faults,  and  offences  which  I,  Thy  sinful,  unprofitable,  and  unworthy  servant  have  committed  from  my  youth,  up  to  the  present day and hour…”    If in any place in the prayers of preparation for Holy Communion there  is  a  statement  of  worthiness  within  man,  it  is  claimed  that  Christ  and  the  Mysteries  themselves  are  the  source  of  that  worthiness.  By  no  means  are  mankind’s own works, such as fasting, considered to make one worthy. Thus,  Blessed Chrysostom writes: “I believe, O Lord, and I confess that thou art truly the  Christ, the Son of the living God, who didst come into the world to save sinners,  of whom I am chief. And I believe that this is truly Thine own immaculate Body,  and  that  this is truly Thine  own precious Blood. Wherefore I  pray  thee, have mercy  upon me and forgive my transgressions both voluntary and involuntary, of word and  of deed, of knowledge and of ignorance; and make me worthy to partake without  condemnation of Thine immaculate Mysteries, unto remission of my sins and  unto life everlasting. Amen.”    St.  Symeon  the  Translator  (+9  November,  c.  950)  writes:  “…O  Christ  Jesus, Wisdom and Peace and Power of God, Who in Thy assumption of our nature  didst suffer Thy life‐giving and saving Passion, the Cross, the Nails, the Spear, and  Death,  mortify  all  the  deadly  passions  of  my  body.  Thou  Who  in  Thy  burial  didst spoil the dominions of hell, bury with good thoughts my evil schemes and  scatter  the  spirits  of  wickedness.  Thou  Who  by  Thy  life‐giving  Resurrection  on  the  third  day  didst  raise  up  our  fallen  first  Parent,  raise  me  up  who  am  sunk  in  sin  and  suggest  to  me  ways  of  repentance.  Thou  Who  by  Thy  glorious  Ascension  didst deify our nature which Thou hadst assumed and didst honor it by Thy session at  the  right  hand  of  the  Father,  make  me  worthy  by  partaking  of  Thy  holy  Mysteries of a place at Thy right hand among those who are saved. Thou Who  by  the  descent  of  the  Spirit,  the  Paraclete,  didst  make  Thy  holy  Disciples  worthy  vessels, make me also a recipient of His coming. Thou Who art to come again to  judge  the  World  with  justice,  grant  me  also  to  meet  Thee  on  the  clouds,  my  Maker  and  Creator,  with  all  Thy  Saints,  that  I  may  unendingly  glorify  and  praise  Thee with Thy Eternal Father and Thy all‐holy and good and life‐giving Spirit, now  and ever, and to the ages of ages. Amen.”    St. Symeon the New Theologian (+12 March, 1022) wrote a poem that  clearly explains how a communicant must regard himself as utterly unworthy  to  receive  the  Holy Body and  Blood  of  the  Lord,  and  entirely hope  in  God’s  mercy:  From sullied lips,   From an abominable heart,   From an unclean tongue,   Out of a polluted soul,   Receive my prayer, O my Christ.   Reject me not,   Nor my words, nor my ways,   Nor even my shamelessness,   But give me courage to say   What I desire, my Christ.   And even more, teach me   What to do and say.   I have sinned more than the harlot…  And all my sins   Take from me, O God of all,   That with a clean heart,   Trembling mind   And contrite spirit   I may partake of Thy pure   And all‐holy Mysteries   By which all who eat and drink Thee   With sincerity of heart   Are quickened and deified…  Therefore I fall at Thy feet   And fervently cry to Thee:   As Thou receivedst the Prodigal   And the Harlot who drew near to Thee,   So have compassion and receive me,   The profligate and the prodigal,   As with contrite spirit   I now draw near to Thee.   I know, O Saviour, that no other   Has sinned against Thee as I,   Nor has done the deeds   That I have committed.   But this again I know   That not the greatness of my offences   Nor the multitude of my sins   Surpasses the great patience   Of my God,   And His extreme love for men.   But with the oil of compassion   Those who fervently repent   Thou dost purify and enlighten   And makest them children of the light,   Sharers of Thy Divine Nature…    St.  John  Damascene  (+4  December,  749),  in  his  first  prayer  of  preparation  for  Holy  Communion,  thus  writes:  “O  Lord  and  Master  Jesus  Christ, our God, who alone hath power to forgive the sins of men, do thou, O Good  One who lovest mankind, forgive all the sins that I have committed in knowledge or  in  ignorance,  and  make  me  worthy  to  receive  without  condemnation  thy  divine, glorious, immaculate and life‐giving Mysteries; not unto punishment  or  unto  increase  of  sin;  but  unto  purification,  and  sanctification  and  a  promise of thy Kingdom and the Life to come; as a protection and a help to  overthrow the adversaries, and to blot out my many sins. For thou art a God of  Mercy  and  compassion  and  love  toward  mankind,  and  unto  Thee  we  ascribe  glory  together  with  the  Father  and  the  Holy  Spirit;  now  and  ever,  and  unto  ages  of  ages.  Amen.”     In his second prayer he writes: “I stand before the gates of thy Temple, and  yet I refrain not from my evil thoughts. But do thou, O Christ my God, who didst  justify  the  publican,  and  hadst  mercy  on  the  Canaanite  woman,  and  opened  the gates of Paradise to the thief; open unto me the compassion of thy love toward  mankind, and receive me as I approach and touch thee, like the sinful woman and  the woman with the issue of blood; for the one, by embracing thy feet received the  forgiveness  of  her  sins,  and  the  other  by  but  touching  the  hem  of  thy  garment  was  healed. And I, most sinful, dare to partake of thy whole Body. Let me not be consumed  but receive me as thou didst receive them, and enlighten the perceptions of my  soul, consuming the accusations of my sins; through the intercessions of Her that  without stain gave Thee birth, and of the heavenly Powers; for thou art blessed unto  ages of ages. Amen.”    While waiting in line to receive Holy Communion, the following verses  of the Blessed Translator are read:  Behold I approach for Divine Communion.  O Creator, let me not be burnt by communicating,  For Thou art Fire which burns the unworthy.  But purify me from every stain.   Tremble, O man, when you see the deifying Blood,  For it is coal that burns the unworthy.  The Body of God both deifies and nourishes;  It deifies the spirit and wondrously nourishes the mind.      The  following  troparion  clearly  expresses  with  what  mindset  and  manner  one  must  approach  the  Mysteries.  Let  it  not  be  thought  that  a  Christian is meant to state the following simply as an act of false humility. On  the contrary, the Christian must truly deny any sense of his self‐worth in the  eyes  of  Christ,  and  must  therefore  submit  himself  entirely  to  Christ’s  judgment, praying that the Lord will judge according to his great mercy and  not according to our sins. The troparion reads: “Of thy Mystic Supper, O Son of  God, accept me today as a communicant; for I will not speak of thy Mystery to Thine  enemies, neither will I give thee a kiss as did Judas; but like the thief will I confess  thee: Remember me, O Lord, in Thy Kingdom. Remember me, O Master, in Thy  Kingdom. Remember me, O Holy One, when Thou comest into Thy Kingdom.” After  a few other troparia, the following prayer is read: “Sovereign Lover of men, Lord  Jesus  my  God,  let  not  these  Holy  Things  be  to  me  for  judgment  through  my  being  unworthy,  but  for  the  purification  and  sanctification  of  my  soul  and  body, and as a pledge of the life and kingdom to come. For it is good for me to  cling to God and to place in the Lord my hope of salvation.”    As  one  approaches  the  Holy  Chalice,  one  should  crosswise  fold  his  hands over his chest, and reflect in his mind the following petition: “Neither  unto  judgement,  nor  unto  condemnation  be  my  partaking  of  thy  Holy  Mysteries,  O  Lord,  but  unto  the  healing  of  soul  and  body.”  When  the  priest  administers the Holy Communion he announces: “The servant of God, [name],  partakes of the precious, most holy and most pure Body and Blood of our Lord, God  and Saviour, Jesus Christ, for the remission of sins and life everlasting. Amen.”  Then, the communicant kisses the bottom of the chalice, thinking of himself as  the harlot who kissed the feet of the Lord while anointing them with precious  myrrh and her penitent tears, while contemplating the Seraphim who touched  a  burning  coal  to  the  mouth  of  Isaiah,  saying:  “Behold,  This  hath  touched  thy  lips, and will take away thine iniquities, and will purge thy sins (Isaiah 6:7).” 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/contracerycii05/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

Pursuit Daily Advent Prayer Devotional 53%

It is about not having to know exactly what is coming tomorrow, only that whatever it is, it is of the essence of sanctification for us.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/11/27/pursuit-daily-advent-prayer-devotional/

27/11/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

w E 18820800 53%

Again, the Sanctification movement among Meth­ odists still progresses-Is this not the same that we term the "High calling ?"

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/08/04/w-e-18820800/

04/08/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

January-Newsletter 50%

The consecration of the waters on this feast places the entire world—through its “prime element” of water—in the perspective of the cosmic creation, sanctification, and glorification of the Kingdom of God in Christ and the Spirit.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/01/14/january-newsletter/

14/01/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

w E 18930515 49%

PRACTICAL QUESTIONS A T ower reader writes that she recently met some of like precious faith, who, while recognizing sanctification as she does, did not seem to have an ecstatic joy, accompanied by great emotion, but, on the contrary, seemed to hold the doc­ trine of full consecration by a process of mental reasoning.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/08/04/w-e-18930515/

04/08/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

The One Sheet Haggadah 47%

LEADER (Raises the first glass of wine, the Cup of Sanctification, and says the following blessing):

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/04/13/the-one-sheet-haggadah/

13/04/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

THE TEN COMMANDMENTS 47%

FOUNDATIONS FOR FREEDOM THE LAW AND THE CHRISTIAN THE FIRST COMM ANDMENT CONCENTR ATION COM M ANDED RELAXATION CO M M ANDED IMAGINATION COM M ANDED SANCTIFICATION CO M M ANDED PRESERVATION OF MARRIAGE COMM ANDED PRESERVATION OF PROPERTY CO M M ANDED PRESERVATION OF TRUTH COMM ANDED LAST BUT NOT LEAST FOUNDATIONS FOR FREEDOM The editor of a newspaper was interviewing a man who applied for the job of being a rewrite man.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/08/28/the-ten-commandments/

28/08/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

I know Thy Tribulation 42%

The proof of His love is ELECTION – that no matter what happened, His love was proven truly by the fact they were chosen unto salvation (because God hath chosen you to salvation through sanctification of the Spirit and belief of the truth).

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/03/12/i-know-thy-tribulation/

12/03/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

Elder of Ziyon Haggadah 5769 39%

This is the essence of Kiddush sanctification - the realization that the Jewish People play a unique role in this world.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/03/27/elder-of-ziyon-haggadah-5769/

27/03/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

Prière de centrage 37%

Le but n'est pas seulement une paix intérieure profonde, mais une sanctification du corps, de l'esprit et du cœur, en effet, du monde entier.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/05/02/priere-de-centrage/

02/05/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

SONS OF GOD 36%

Of course, some people will argue that children are sanctified by their parents, but mere sanctification is not enough for God to adopt a person as His son.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/05/31/sons-of-god/

31/05/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

contracerycii03 35%

ANCIENT AND CONTEMPORARY FATHERS REGARDING  SO‐CALLED “WORTHINESS” OF THE HOLY MYSTERIES    St. John Cassian (+29 February, 435) totally disagrees with the notion  of  Bp.  Kirykos  that  the  early  Christians  communed  frequently  supposedly  because  “they  fasted  in  the  fine  and  broader  sense,  that  is,  they  were  worthy  to  commune.”  Blessed  Cassian  does  not  approve  of  Christians  shunning  communion  because  they  think  of  themselves  as  unworthy,  and  supposedly  different  to  the  early  Christians.  Thus  whichever  side  one  takes  in  this  supposed dispute of Semipelagianism, be it the side of Blessed Augustine or  that of Blessed Cassian, the truth is that both of these Holy Fathers condemn  the notions held by Bp. Kirykos.    Blessed Cassian writes: “We must not avoid communion because we deem  ourselves to be sinful. We must approach it more often for the healing of the soul and  the  purification  of  the  spirit,  but  with  such  humility  and  faith  that  considering  ourselves  unworthy,  we  would  desire  even  more  the  medicine  for  our  wounds.  Otherwise  it  is  impossible  to  receive  communion  once  a  year,  as  certain  people  do,  considering the sanctification of heavenly Mysteries as available only to saints. It is  better to think that by giving us grace, the sacrament makes us pure and holy.  Such people [who commune rarely] manifest more pride than humility, for when  they receive, they think of themselves as worthy. It is much better if, in humility  of  heart,  knowing  that  we  are  never  worthy  of  the  Holy  Mysteries  we  would  receive  them  every  Sunday  for  the  healing  of  our  diseases,  rather  than,  blinded  by  pride, think that after one year we become worthy of receiving them.” (John  Cassian, Conference 23, Chapter 21)    Now, as for those who may think the above notion  is only applicable  for the Christians living at the time of St. John Cassian (5th century), and that  the  people  at  that  time  were  justified  in  confessing  their  sins  frequently  and  also communing frequently, throughout the year, while that supposedly this  does not apply to contemporary Orthodox Christians, such a notion does not  hold  any  validity,  because  contemporary  Holy  Fathers,  among  them  the  Hesychastic  Fathers  and  Kollyvades  Fathers,  have  taught  exactly  the  same  thing  as  we  have  read  above  in  the  writings  of  Blessed  Cassian.  Thus  St.  Gregory  Palamas,  St.  Symeon  the  New  Theologian,  St.  Macarius  Notaras  of  Corinth,  St.  Nicodemus  of  Athos,  St.  Arsenius  of  Paros,  St.  Pachomius  of  Chios, St. Nectarius of Aegina, St. Matthew of Bresthena, St. Moses of Athikia,  and so many other contemporary Orthodox Saints agree with the positions of  the  Blessed  Cassian.  The  various  quotes  from  these  Holy  Fathers  are  to  be  provided in another study regarding the letter of Bp. Kirykos to Fr. Pedro. In  any  case,  not  only  contemporary  Greek  Fathers,  but  even  contemporary  Syrian, Russian, Bulgarian, Serbian and Romanian Fathers concur.     St.  Arsenius  the  Russian  of  Stavronikita  (+24  March,  1846),  for  example, writes: “One can sometimes hear people say that they avoid approaching  the Holy Mysteries because they consider themselves unworthy. But who is worthy  of it? No one on earth is worthy of it, but whoever confesses his sins with heartfelt  contrition  and  approaches  the  Chalice  of  Christ  with  consciousness  of  his  unworthiness  the  Lord  will  not  reject,  in  accordance  with  His  words,  Him  that  cometh to Me I shall in no wise cast out (John 6:37).” (Athonite Monastery of St.  Panteleimon, Athonite Leaflets, No. 105, published in 1905)    St. John Chrysostom (+14 September, 407), Archbishop of the Imperial  City  of  Constantinople  New  Rome,  speaks  very  much  against  the  idea  of  making fasting and communing a mere custom. He instead insists on making  true repentance of tears and communion with God a daily ritual. For no one  passes a single day without sinning at least in thought if not also in word and  deed. Likewise, no one can live a true life in Christ without daily repentance  and  frequent  Communion.  But  in  fact,  the  greatest  method  to  abstain  from  sins  is  by  the  fear  of  communing  unworthily.  Thus,  through  frequent  Communion one is guided towards abstinence from sins. Of course, the grace  of the Mysteries themselves are essential in this process of cleansing the brain,  heart and bowel of the body, as well as cleansing the mind, spirit and word of  the soul. But the fear of hellfire as experienced in the partaking of communion  unworthily is most definitely a means of preventing sins.     But  if  one  thinks  that  fasting  for  seven  days  without  meat,  five  days  without  dairy,  three  days  without  oil,  and  one  day  without  anything  but  xerophagy,  is  a  means  to  make  one  “worthy”  of  Communion,  whereas  the  communicant  then  returns  to  his  life  of  sin  until  the  next  year  when  he  decides  to  commune  again,  then  not  only  was  this  one  week  of  fasting  worthless, not only would 40 days of lent be unprofitable, but even an entire  lifetime  of  fasting  will  be  useless.  For  such  a  person  makes  fasting  and  Communion a mere custom, rather than a way of Life in Christ.    Blessed  Chrysostom  writes:  “But  since  I  have  mentioned  this  sacrifice,  I  wish to say a little in reference to you who have been initiated; little in quantity, but  possessing great force and profit, for it is not our own, but the words of Divine Spirit.  What then is it? Many partake of this sacrifice once in the whole year; others twice;  others  many  times.  Our  word  then  is  to  all;  not  to  those  only  who  are  here,  but  to  those also who are settled in the desert. For they partake once in the year, and often  indeed  at  intervals  of  two  years.  What  then?  Which  shall  we  approve?  Those  [who  receive] once [in the year]? Those who [receive] many times? Those who [receive] few  times?  Neither  those  [who  receive]  once,  nor  those  [who  receive]  often,  nor  those  [who  receive]  seldom,  but  those  [who  come]  with  a  pure  conscience,  from  a  pure  heart,  with  an  irreproachable  life.  Let  such  draw  near  continually;  but  those  who  are  not  such,  not  even  once.  Why,  you  will  ask?  Because  they  receive  to  themselves  judgment,  yea  and  condemnation,  and  punishment, and vengeance. And do not wonder. For as food, nourishing by nature, if  received  by  a  person  without  appetite,  ruins  and  corrupts  all  [the  system],  and  becomes an occasion of disease, so surely is it also with respect to the awful mysteries.  Do  you  feast  at  a  spiritual  table,  a  royal  table,  and  again  pollute  your  mouth  with  mire?  Do  you  anoint  yourself  with  sweet  ointment,  and  again  fill  yourself  with  ill  savors?  Tell  me,  I  beseech  you,  when  after  a  year  you  partake  of  the  Communion, do you think that the Forty Days are sufficient for you for the  purifying of the sins of all that time? And again, when a week has passed, do  you  give  yourself  up  to  the  former  things?  Tell  me  now,  if  when  you  have  been  well for forty days after a long illness, you should again give yourself up to the food  which  caused  the  sickness,  have  you  not  lost  your  former  labor  too?  For  if  natural  things  are  changed,  much  more  those  which  depend  on  choice.  As  for  instance,  by  nature we see, and naturally we have healthy eyes; but oftentimes from a bad habit [of  body] our power of vision is injured. If then natural things are changed, much more  those of choice. Thou assignest forty days for the health of the soul, or perhaps  not  even  forty,  and  do  you  expect  to  propitiate  God?  Tell  me,  are  you  in  sport? These things I say, not as forbidding you the one and annual coming,  but as wishing you to draw near continually.” (John Chrysostom, Homily 17,  on Hebrews 10:2‐9)    The Holy Fathers also stress the importance of confession of sins as the  ultimate  prerequisite  for  Holy  Communion,  while  remaining  completely  silent  about  any  specific  fast  that  is  somehow  generally  applicable  to  all  laymen equally. It is true that the spiritual father (who hears the confession of  the  penitent  Orthodox  Christian  layman)  does  have  the  authority  to  require  his spiritual son to fulfill a fast of repentance before communion. But the local  bishop (who is not  the layman’s spiritual father but  only a  distant  observer)  most certainly does not have the authority to demand the priests to enforce a  single method of preparation common to all laymen without distinction, such  as what Bp. Kirykos does in his letter to Fr. Pedro. For man cannot be made  “worthy”  due  to  such  a  pharisaic  fast  that  is  conducted  for  mere  custom’s  sake rather than serving as a true form of repentance. Indeed it is possible for  mankind  to  become  worthy  of  Holy  Communion.  But  this  worthiness  is  derived from the grace of God which directs the soul away from sins, and it is  derived  from  the  Mysteries  themselves,  particularly  the  Mystery  of  Repentance  (also  called  Confession  or  Absolution)  and  the  Mystery  of  the  Body and Blood of Christ (also called the Eucharist or Holy Communion).    St.  Nicholas  Cabasilas  (+20  June,  1391),  Archbishop  of  Thessalonica,  writes: “The Bread which truly strengthens the heart of man will obtain this for us; it  will enkindle in us ardor for contemplation, destroying the torpor that weighs down  our  soul;  it  is  the  Bread  which  has  come  down  from  heaven  to  bring  Life;  it  is  the  Bread  that  we  must  seek  in  every  way.  We  must  be  continually  occupied  with  this  Eucharistic banquet lest we suffer famine. We must guard against allowing our soul  to grow anemic and sickly, keeping away from this food under the pretext of reverence  for the sacrament. On the contrary, after telling our sins to the priest, we must  drink of the expiating Blood.” (St. Nicholas Cabasilas, The Life in Christ).    St.  Matthew  Carpathaces  (+14  May,  1950),  Archbishop  of  Athens,  while still an Archimandrite, published a book in 1933 in which he wrote five  pages  regarding  the  Mystery  of  Holy  Communion.  In  these  five  pages  he  addresses  the  issue  of  Holy  Communion,  worthiness  and  preparation.  Nowhere  in  it  does  he  speak  of  any  particular  pre‐communion  fast.  On  the  contrary, in the rest of the book he speaks only about the fasts of Wednesday  and  Friday  throughout  the  year,  and  the  four  Lenten  seasons  of  Nativity,  Pascha,  Apostles  and  Dormition.  He  also  mentions  that  married  couples  should  avoid  marital  relations  on  Wednesdays,  Fridays,  Saturdays  and  Sundays.  Aside  from  these  fasts  and  abstaining,  he  mentions  no  such  thing  about a pre‐communion fast anywhere in the book, and the book is over 300  pages long.     In  the  section  where  he  speaks  specifically  regarding  Holy  Communion,  Blessed  Matthew  speaks  only  of  confession  of  sins  as  a  prerequisite  to  Holy  Communion,  and  he  mentions  the  importance  of  abstaining from sins. Nowhere does he suggest that partaking of foods on the  days  the  Orthodox  Church  permits  is  supposedly  a  sin.  For  to  claim  such  a  thing is a product of Manicheanism and is anathematized by several councils.  But  Blessed  Matthew  of  Bresthena  was  no  Manichean,  he  was  a  Genuine  Orthodox Christian, a preserver of Orthodoxy in its fullness. The fact he had  600 nuns and 200 monks flock around him during his episcopate in Greece is  proof of his spiritual heights and that he was an Orthodox Christian not only  in  thought  and  word,  but  also  in  deed.  Yet  Bp.  Kirykos,  who  in  his  thirty  years  as  a  pastor  has  not  managed  to  produce  a  single  spiritual  offspring,  dares to claim that Blessed Matthew of Bresthena is the source of his corrupt  and heretical views. But nothing could be further from the truth.     In  Blessed  Matthew’s  written  works,  which  are  manifold  and  well‐ preserved,  nowhere  does  he  suggest  that  clergy  can  simply  follow  the  common  fasting  rules  of  the  Orthodox  Church  and  commune  several  times  per week, while if laymen follow the same Orthodox rules of fasting just as do  the priests, they are supposedly not free to commune but must undergo some  kind  of  extra  fast.  Nowhere  does  he  demand  this  fast  that  is  not  as  a  punishment  for  laymen’s  sins,  but  is  implemented  merely  because  they  are  laymen, since this fast is being demanded irrespective of the outcome of their  confession to the priest. Yet despite all of this, Bp. Kirykos arbitrarily uses the  name  of  Bishop  Matthew  as  supposedly  agreeing  with  his  positions.  The  following  quote  from  the  works  of  Blessed  Matthew  will  shatter  Kirykos’s  notion that “fasting in the finer and broader sense” can make a Christian “worthy  to  commune,”  without  mentioning  the  Holy  Mysteries  of  Confession  and  Communion themselves as the source of that worthiness.     The following quote will shatter Bp. Kirykos’ attempt to misrepresent  the  positions  of  Blessed  Matthew,  which  is  something  that  Bp.  Kirykos  is  guilty of doing for the past 30 years, tarnishing the name of Blessed Matthew,  and  causing  division  and  self‐destruction  within  the  Genuine  Orthodox  Church of Greece, while at the same time boasting of somehow being Bishop  Matthew’s  only  real  follower.  It  is  time  for  Bp.  Kirykos’  three‐decades‐long  façade  to  be  shattered.  This  shattering  shall  not  only  apply  to  the  façade  regarding the pharisaic‐style fast, but even the façade regarding the post‐1976  ecclesiology  held  by  Bp.  Kirykos  and  his  associate,  Mr.  Gkoutzidis—an  ecclesiology  which  is  found  nowhere  in  the  encyclicals  of  the  Genuine  Orthodox  Church  from  1935  until  the  1970s.  That  was  the  time  that  Mr.  Gkoutzidis  and  the  then  layman  Mr.  Kontogiannis  (now  Bp.  Kirykos)  began  controlling the Matthewite Synod. On the contrary, many historic encyclicals  of  the  Genuine  Orthodox  Church  contradict  this  post‐1976  Gkoutzidian‐ Kontogiannian  ecclesiology,  for  which  reason  the  duo  has  kept  these  documents hidden in the Synodal archives for three decades. But let us begin  the  shattering  of  the  façade  with  the  position  of  Blessed  Matthew  regarding  frequent  Communion.  For  God  has  willed  that  this  be  the  first  article  by  Bishop Matthew to be translated into English that is not of an ecclesiological  nature,  but  a  work  in  regards  to  Orthopraxia,  something  rarely  spoken  and  seldom found in the endlessly repetitive periodicals of the Kirykite faction.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/contracerycii03/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

history of the future-r 33%

Appendix K Jewish Wedding Parallels Bride of Christ Appendix L Justification/Sanctification Salvation OSAS -- OJAJ Appendix M Jer 49:34-39 Destruction of Elam – Western Iran Appendix N Holy City Jerusalem verses New Jerusalem Appendix O Olivet Discourse – Post Rapture (mostly) Appendix P No One Knows Day nor Hour applies to 2nd Coming Appendix Q Proportion Theology / SBC / Calvary Chapel -- Not Calvin nor Armenian Appendix R Servitude of the Nation and Desolations of Jerusalem—Sir Robert Anderson Appendix S Behold the Hand --- Behold the Nail Appendix T Flowchart -- Living the Christian Life during the Church Age Appendix U Is the Millennium foreshadowed in the Ark of the Covenant?

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/09/20/history-of-the-future-r/

20/09/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

contracerycii07 32%

PELAGIANISM IS NOTHING OTHR THAN THE  “CHRISTIAN” VERSION OF PHARISAISM    Although we are speaking of the heresy of Pelagianism and not that of  Pharisaism, it is difficult not to mention the Pharisees because their positions  were also a kind of Pelagianism. In fact, the Pharisaic view of fasting is very  much identical to the view held by Bp. Kirykos, since he thinks that “fasting  in  the  finer  and  broader  sense”  makes  someone  “worthy  to  commune.”  But  our  Lord  Jesus  Christ  rebuked  the  Pharisees  for  this  error  of  theirs.  Fine  examples of these rebukes are found in the Gospels. The best example is the  parable  of  the  Pharisee  and  the  Publican,  because  it  shows  the  difference  between  a  Pharisee  who  thinks  of  himself  as  “worthy”  due  to  his  fasts,  compared to a Christian who is conscious of his unworthiness and cries to the  Lord for mercy. It is a perfect example because it mentions fasting. This well‐ known parable spoken by the Lord Himself, reads as follows:    “And he spake this parable unto certain which trusted in themselves that they  were  righteous,  and  despised  others:  Two  men  went  up  into  the  temple  to  pray;  the  one  a  Pharisee,  and  the  other  a  publican.  The  Pharisee  stood  and  prayed  thus  with  himself,  God,  I  thank  thee,  that  I  am  not  as  other  men  are,  extortioners,  unjust,  adulterers, or even as this publican. I fast twice in the week, I give tithes of all that I  possess.  And  the  publican,  standing  afar  off,  would  not  lift  up  so  much  as  his  eyes  unto heaven, but smote upon his breast, saying, God be merciful to me a sinner. I tell  you,  this  man  went  down  to  his  house  justified  rather  than  the  other:  for  every  one  that  exalteth  himself  shall  be  abased;  and  he  that  humbleth  himself  shall  be  exalted  (Luke 18:9‐14).”    Behold the word of the Lord! The Publican was more justified than the  Pharisee!  The  Publican  was  more  worthy  than  the  Pharisee!  But  today’s  Christians  cannot  be  justified  if  they  are  “extortionists,  unjust,  adulterers  or  even… publicans.” For they have the Gospel, the Church, the guidance of the  spiritual  father,  and  the  washing  away  of  their  sins  through  the  once‐off  Mysteries of Baptism and Chrism, and the repetitive Mysteries of Confession  and Communion. They have no excuse to be sinners, and if they are they have  the  method  available  to  correct  themselves.  But  how  much  more  so  are  Christians not justified in being Pharisees? For they have this parable spoken  by the Lord Himself as clear proof of Christ’s disfavor towards “the leaven of  the  Pharisees.”  They  have  hundreds  of  Holy  Fathers’  epistles,  homilies  and  dialogues, which they must have read in their pursuit of exulting themselves!  They have before them the repeated exclamations of the Lord, “Woe unto you,  Scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! For ye shut up the kingdom of heaven against men!  For  ye  neither  go  in  yourselves,  neither  suffer  ye  them  that  are  entering  to  go  in  (Matthew  23:13).”  They  have  even  the  very  fact  that  it  was  an  apostle  who  betrayed the Lord, and not a mere disciple but one of the twelve! They have  the fact that it was not an idolatrous nation that judged its savior and found  him guilty, but it was God’s own chosen people that condemned the world’s  Savior to death! They have even the fact that the Scribes, Pharisees and High  Priests were the ones who crucified the King of Glory! Yet despite having all  of these clear proofs, they continue their Pharisaism, but the “Christian” kind,  namely, Pelagianism. But who are we to condemn them? After all, we are but  sinners.  Therefore  let  them  take  heed  to  the  Lord’s  rebuke:  “Ye  serpents,  ye  generation of vipers, how can ye escape the damnation of hell? (Matthew 23:33).  A Genuine Orthodox Christian (i.e., non‐Pelagian, non‐Pharisee), approaches  the Holy Chalice with nothing but disdain and humiliation for his wretched  soul, and feels his utter unworthiness, and truly believes that what is found in  that Chalice is God in the Flesh, and mankind’s only source of salvation and  life. If a man is to ever be called “worthy,” the origin of that worth is not in  himself, but is in that Holy Chalice from which he is about to commune. For a  man who lives of himself will surely die. But a man who lives in Christ, and  through  Holy  Communion  allows  Christ  to  live  in  him,  such  a  man  shall  never die. As Christ said: “I am the living bread which came down from heaven: if  any man eat of this bread, he shall live for ever: and the bread that I will give is my  flesh, which I will give for the life of the world (John 6:51).”     Thus a Genuine Orthodox Christian does not boast that he “fasts twice a  week” as did the Pharisee, but recognizing only his own imperfections before  the face of the perfect Christ, he smites his breast as did the Publican, saying,  “God be merciful to me a sinner.” Like the malefactor that he is in thought, word  and deed, he imitates the malefactor that was crucified with the Lord, saying,  “I indeed justly [am condemned]; for I received the due reward for my deeds: but this  man,  [my  Lord,  God  and  Savior,  Jesus  Christ,]  hath  done  nothing  amiss  (Luke  23:41).” And he says unto Jesus, “Lord, remember me when thou comest into thy  kingdom  (Luke  23:42).”  To  such  a  Genuine  Orthodox  Christian,  free  of  Pharisaism  and  Pelagianism,  the  Lord  responds,  “Verily  I  say  unto  thee,  today  shalt  thou  be  with  me  in  paradise  (Luke  23:43),”  and  “I  appoint  unto  you  a  kingdom, as my Father hath appointed unto me, that ye may eat and drink at my table  in my kingdom (Luke 22:29).”    How  does  all  of  the  above  compare  to  Bp.  Kirykos’  statement  that  “fasting according to one’s strength” causes one to “worthily receive the body and  blood  of  the  Lord?”  How  can  Bp.  Kirykos  justify  his  theory  that  the  early  Christians  supposedly  “fasted  in  the  fine  and  broader  sense,  that  is,  they  were  worthy  to  commune?”  Can  anyone,  no  matter  how  strictly  they  fast,  ever  be  considered  worthy  of  Holy  Communion?  Does  someone’s  work  of  fasting  make them worthy? Is Bp. Kirykos justified in believing that fasting for three  days  without  oil  or  wine  supposedly  makes  an  individual  worthy  of  Holy  Communion? If Bp. Kirykos is justified, then why does he not do this himself?  Why does he eat oil on every Saturday of Great Lent, and yet communes on  Sundays  “unworthily”  (according  to  his  own  theory)  without  shame?  Why  does he demand the three day fast from oil upon laymen, but does not apply  it to himself and his priests?     We are not speaking of laymen with penances and excommunications.  We are speaking of laymen who have confessed their sins and are permitted  by  their  spiritual  father  to  receive  Holy  Communion.  When  such  laymen  receive  Holy  Communion  they  are  not  meant  to  kiss  the  hand  of  the  priest  after  this,  because  the  Orthodox  Church  believes  in  their  equality  with  the  priest  through  the  Mysteries.  There  is  no  difference  between  priests  and  laymen when it comes to the ability to commune, except only for the fact that  the clergy  receive  the Immaculate Mysteries within the  Holy Bema,  whereas  the  laity  receives  them  from  the  Royal  Doors.  Aside  from  this,  there  is  no  difference in the preparation for Holy Communion either. The laymen cannot  be compelled to fast extra fasts simply for being laymen, whereas priests are  not required to do these extra fasts at all on account of being priests.    The equality of the clergy and laity with regards to Holy Communion  is clearly expressed by Blessed Chrysostom: “There are cases when a priest does  not differ from a layman, notably when one approaches the Holy Mysteries. We are all  equally given them, not as in the Old Testament, when one food was for the priests  and another for the people and when it was not permitted to the people to partake of  that which was for the priest. Now it is not so: but to all is offered the same Body and  the same Chalice…” (John Chrysostom, Homily 18, on 2 Corinthians 8:24)    This is why the Orthodox Church preserves this tradition whereby the  priest forbids the laymen who have communed from kissing his hand. These  are  the  pious  laymen  we  refer  to:  those  who  are  deemed  acceptable  to  approach  the  Chalice.  Aren’t  the  bishops  and  priests  obliged  to  fast  more  strictly than the laymen, especially since the bishops and priests are the ones  invoking the Holy Spirit to descend on the gifts, while the laymen only stand  in the crowd of the people? So then why does Bp. Kirykos demand the three‐ day strict fast (forbidding even oil and wine) upon laymen, while he himself  and his priests not only partake of oil and wine, but outside of fasting periods  they even partake of fish, eggs, dairy products (and for married clergy, even  meat) as late as 11:30pm on the night before they are to serve Divine Liturgy  and commune of the Holy Mysteries “worthily” yet without fasting?     Are such hypocrisies Christian or are they Pharisaic? What does Christ  have to say regarding the Pharisees who ordered laymen to fast more heavily  while the Pharisee hierarchy did not do this themselves? Christ rebuked and  condemned them harshly. Thus we read in the Gospel according to St. Luke:  “Then spake Jesus to the multitude, and to his disciples, saying: “The Scribes and the  Pharisees  sit  in  Mosesʹ  seat.  All  therefore  whatsoever  they  bid  you  observe,  that  observe and do; but do not ye after their works: for they say, and do not. For they bind  heavy burdens and grievous to be borne, and lay them on men’s shoulders; but they  themselves will not move them with one of their fingers.” (Luke 23:1‐4).      So much for the Pharisees and their successors, the Pelagians! So much  for  Bp.  Kirykos  and  those  who  agree  with  his  blasphemous  positions,  for  these men are the Pharisees and Pelagians of our time! May God have mercy  on  them and  enlighten them to  depart  from the  darkness of their  hypocrisy.  May God also enlighten us to shun all forms of Pharisaism and Pelagianism,  including  this  most  dangerous  form  adopted  by  Bp.  Kirykos.  May  we  shun  this  heresy  by  ceasing  to  rely  on  our  own  human  perfections  that  are  but  abominations  in  the  eyes  of  our  perfect  God.  Let  us  take  heed  to  the  admonition of one who himself was a Pharisee named Saul, but later became  a  Christian  named  Paul.  For,  he  was  truly  blinded  by  the  darkness  of  his  Pharisaic  self‐righteousness,  but  Christ  blinded  him  with  the  eternal  light  of  sanctifying and soul‐saving Divine Grace. This Apostle to the Nations writes:       “For Christ sent me not to baptize, but to preach the gospel: not with wisdom  of words, lest the cross of Christ should be made of none effect. For the preaching of  the cross is to them that perish foolishness; but unto us which are saved it is the power  of  God.  For  it  is  written,  I  will  destroy  the  wisdom  of  the  wise,  and  will  bring  to  nothing the understanding of the prudent.     Where  is  the  wise?  where  is  the  scribe?  where  is  the  disputer  of  this  world?  hath not God made foolish the wisdom of this world? For after that in the wisdom of  God  the  world  by  wisdom  knew  not  God,  it  pleased  God  by  the  foolishness  of  preaching to save them that believe. For the Jews require a sign, and the Greeks seek  after  wisdom:  But  we  preach  Christ  crucified,  unto  the  Jews  a  stumblingblock,  and  unto the  Greeks foolishness; But  unto  them which are called, both Jews and  Greeks,  Christ  the  power  of  God,  and  the  wisdom  of  God.  Because  the  foolishness  of  God  is  wiser than men; and the weakness of God is stronger than men.     For ye see your calling, brethren, how that not many wise men after the flesh,  not many mighty, not many noble, are called: But God hath chosen the foolish things  of the world to confound the wise; and God hath chosen the weak things of the world  to  confound  the  things  which  are  mighty;  And base  things  of  the  world,  and  things  which  are  despised,  hath  God  chosen,  yea,  and  things  which  are  not,  to  bring  to  nought things that are: That no flesh should glory in his presence. But of him are ye  in  Christ  Jesus,  who  of  God  is  made  unto  us  wisdom,  and  righteousness,  and  sanctification, and redemption: That, according as it is written, He that glorieth, let  him glory in the Lord (1 Corinthians 1:17‐31).”      Yea, Lord, help us to submit entirely to Thy will, and to learn to glorify  only in Thee, and not in our own works. For in truth, even the greatest works  of  ours,  even  the  work  of  fasting,  whether  for  one  day,  three  days,  a  week,  forty  days,  or  even  a  lifetime,  is  worthless  before  Thy  sight.  As  the  prophet  declares,  our  works  are  an  abomination,  and  our  righteousness  is  but  a  menstruous rag. Therefore, O Lord, judge us according to Thy mercy and not  according to our sins. For Thou alone can make us worthy of Communion.      Note  that  in  the  above  short  prayer  by  the  present  author,  the  word  “us”  is  used  and  not  “them.”  This  is  because,  in  order  to  preserve  oneself  from  becoming  a  Pharisee,  one  must  always  include  himself  among  those  who  are  lacking  in  conduct,  and  must  ask  God  for  guidance  as  well  as  for  others. In this manner, one does not fall into the danger of the Pharisee who  said “God, I thank thee that I am not as other men are…” but rather acknowledges  his own misconduct, and thereby includes himself in the prayer, imitating the  publican  who  said  “God  be  merciful  to  me  a  sinner.”  For  there  is  no  point  preaching  against  Pharisaism  unless  one  first  admonishes  and  reproves  his  own soul, and asks God to cleans himself from this hypocrisy of the Pharisees.  For we are not to hate the sinners, but rather the sin itself; and we are not to  hate  the  heretics,  but  rather  the  heresy  itself.  In  so  doing,  our  Confession  against the sins and heresies themselves constitute a “work of love.”      But when it comes to people judging Christians for food, or Sabbaths,  such  as  what  Bp.  Kirykos  has  done  by  his  two  blasphemous  letters  to  Fr.  Pedro,  this  is  definitely  not  a  “work  of  love”  but  is  in  fact  the  leaven  of  the  Pharisees in its fullness. It is a work of demonic self‐righteousness and satanic  hatred towards mankind. For rather than being a true spiritual father towards  his spiritual children, he proves to be a negligent and self‐serving, and a user  of  his  flock  for  his  own  personal  gain.  He  allows  himself  to  commune  very  frequently  without  the  slightest  fast,  while  demanding  strict  fasting  on  his  flock while also forbidding them to ever commune on Sundays. Thus it is well  that  Mr.  Christos  Noukas,  the  advisor  to  Fr.  Pedro,  asked  Bp.  Kirykos:  “Are  you  a  father  or  a  stepfather?”  By  this  he  meant,  “Do  you  truly  love  your  spiritual children as a true spiritual father should, or do you consider them to  be another man’s children and nothing but a burden to you?”      Our  Lord,  God  and  Savior,  Jesus  Christ,  in  the  sermon  in  which  he  taught us to pray to “Our Father,” explained the love of a true father towards  his  children.  The  account,  as  contained  in  the  Gospel  of  Luke,  is  as  follows:  “And [Jesus] said unto them, Which of you shall have a friend, and shall go unto him  at midnight, and say unto him, Friend, lend me three loaves; For a friend of mine in  his journey is come to me, and I have nothing to set before him? And he from within  shall answer and say, Trouble me not: the door is now shut, and my children are with 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/contracerycii07/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

w E 18930115 27%

The glorious doctrine of Entire Sanctification is rarely heard and seldom witnessed to in the pulpits.” Methodist Exchange.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/08/04/w-e-18930115/

04/08/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

w E 18990000 26%

Let us all note well this point,— “ This is the will of God [concerning you], even your sanctification.” Let nothing becloud or obscure this truth;—neither other truths nor er­ rors.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/08/04/w-e-18990000/

04/08/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

w E 18810300 25%

JUSTIFICATION, SANCTIFICATION, REDEMPTION These are the three steps by which we are to reach "the prize of ou1· high calling"-glory, honor and immortality.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/08/04/w-e-18810300/

04/08/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

w E 18931201 15%

V er.se 2 shows that the election referred to was not an aibitrary election, but that it was conditioned upon three things— 11) the sanctification or full consecration of the be­ liever:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/08/04/w-e-18931201/

04/08/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

w E 18800200 14%

VOL. I PITTSBURGH, PA., FEBRUARY, 1880 No.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/08/04/w-e-18800200/

04/08/2017 www.pdf-archive.com