Search


PDF Archive search engine
Last database update: 26 January at 23:02 - Around 76000 files indexed.


Show results per page

Results for «sanctified»:


Total: 80 results - 0.112 seconds

CHRIO BIBLE STUDY OUTLINES 06 93%

Why should Christians seek to live a sanctified life?

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/10/05/chrio-bible-study-outlines-06/

05/10/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

w E 18830200 86%

’Tis glorious and fair, Since justified, sanctified, His glory I’ll share:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/08/04/w-e-18830200/

04/08/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

consecrationserviceeng 79%

The Prayer of Episcopal Consecration    The  consecration  prayer  itself  proves  the  fact  that  other  bishops  must  be present and lay their hands on the ordinand during the rite consecration:  Hierarch:  Master,  Lord,  our  God,  Thou  who  legislated  unto  us  through  Thine  All‐ famed  Apostle  Paul,  regarding  the  order  of  degrees  and  orders,  for  the  purpose  of  serving  and  liturgizing  Thy  venerable  and  immaculate  Mysteries  in  Thy  Holy  Sanctuary: first Apostles, second Prophets, third Teachers. Likewise, O Master of All,  this here elected one who has been granted worthy to carry the Evangelical yoke, and  the  High  Priestly  rank,  by  the  hand  of  sinful  me,  and  by  those  of  the  witnessing  Concelebrants  and  Co‐Bishops,  by  the  inspiration  and  power  and  grace of Thy Holy Spirit, strengthen, as Though strengthened the Holy Apostles and  Prophets,  as  Thou  anointed  the  Kings,  as  Though  sanctified  the  High  Priests,  and  grant  unto  him  the  High  Priesthood  without  reproach,  and  adorning  him  with  all  piety, elect him holy and make him worthy, that he may intercede for the salvation of  the people, and that they may obey Thee through him. For sanctified is Thy Name and  glorified is Thy Kingdom, of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit, now  and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.”    The original Greek is as follows:   Ἀρχιερεὺς:   Δέσποτα  Κύριε,  ὁ  Θεὸς  ἡμῶν,  ὁ  νομοθετήσας  ἡμῖν  διὰ  τοῦ  πανευφήμου  σου  Ἀποστόλου  Παύλου,  βαθμῶν  καὶ  ταγμάτων  τάξιν,  εἰς  τὸ  ἐξυπηρετεῖσθαι,  καὶ  λειτουργεῖν  τοῖς  σεπτοῖς,  καὶ  ἀχράντοις  σου  Μυστηρίοις  ἐν  τῶ  ἁγίω  σου  Θυσιαστηρίω,  πρῶτον  Ἀποστόλους,  δεύτερον  Προφήτας, τρίτον Διδασκάλους.  Αὐτός, Δέσποτα τῶν ἁπάντων, καὶ τοῦτον  τὸν  ψηφισθέντα,  καὶ  ἀξιωθέντα  ὑπεισελθεῖν  τὸν  Εὐαγγελικὸν  ζυγόν,  καὶ  τὴν  Ἀρχιερατικὴν  ἀξίαν,  διὰ  τῆς  χειρὸς  ἐμοῦ  τοῦ  ἁμαρτωλοῦ,  καὶ  τῶν  συμπαρόντων  Λειτουργῶν  καὶ  Συνεπισκόπων,  τῆ  ἐπιφοιτήσει  καὶ  δυνάμει, καὶ χάριτι τοῦ Ἁγίου σου Πνεύματος, ἐνίσχυσον, ὡς ἐνίσχυσας τοὺς  ἁγῖους  σου  Ἀποστόλους,  καὶ  Προφήτας,  ὡς  ἔχρισας  τοὺς  Βασιλεῖς  ,  ὡς  ἡγίασας  τοὺς  Ἀρχιερεῖς,  καὶ  ἀνεπίληπτον  αὐτοῦ  τὴν  Ἀρχιερωσύνην  ἀπόδειξον,  καὶ  πάση  σεμνότητι  κατακοσμῶν,  ἅγιον  ἀνάδειξον,  εἰς  τὸ  ἄξιον  γενέσθαι,  τοῦ  αἰτεῖν  αὐτὸν  τὰ  πρὸς  σωτηρίαν  τοῦ  λαοῦ,  καὶ  ἐπακούειν  σε  αὐτοῦ.   Ὄτι  ἡγίασταί  σου  τὸ  ὄνομα  καὶ  δεδόξασταί  σου  ἡ  Βασιλεία,  τοῦ  Πατρός,  καὶ  τοῦ  Υἱοῦ,  καὶ  τοῦ  ἁγίου  Πνεύματος,  νῦν  καὶ  ἀεί,  καὶ  εἰς  τοὺς  αἰῶνας τῶν αἰώνων. 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/consecrationserviceeng/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

contracerycii06 73%

FROM THE ANAPHORAE OF THE ANCIENT CHURCH  REGARDING “WORTHINESS” OF HOLY COMMUNION    This  can  also  be  demonstrated  by  the  secret  prayers  within  Divine  Liturgy.  From  the  early  Apostolic  Liturgies,  right  down  to  the  various  Liturgies  of  the  Local  Churches  of  Jerusalem,  Antioch,  Alexandria,  Constantinople,  Rome,  Gallia,  Hispania,  Britannia,  Cappadocia,  Armenia,  Persia, India and Ethiopia, in Liturgies that were once vibrant in the Orthodox  Church,  prior  to  the  Nestorian,  Monophysite  and  Papist  schisms,  as  well  as  those  Liturgies  still  in  common  use  today  among  the  Orthodox  Christians  (namely,  the  Liturgies  of  St.  John  Chrysostom,  St.  Basil  the  Great  and  the  Presanctified Liturgy of St. Gregory the Dialogist), the message is quite clear  in all the mystic prayers that the clergy and the laity are referred to as entirely  unworthy, and truly they are to believe they are unworthy, and that no action  of  their  own can make them worthy  (i.e.  not  even  fasting), but  that  only the  Lord’s  mercy  and  grace  through  the  Gifts  themselves  will  allow  them  to  receive communion without condemnation. To demonstrate this, let us begin  with the early Apostolic Liturgies, and from there work our way through as  many of the oblations used throughout history, as have been found in ancient  manuscripts, among them those still offered within Orthodoxy today.    St.  James  the  Brother‐of‐God  (+23  October,  62),  First  Bishop  of  Jerusalem, begins his anaphora as follows: “O Sovereign Lord our God, condemn  me  not,  defiled with a multitude  of sins: for,  behold, I  have  come to  this Thy divine  and heavenly mystery, not as being worthy; but looking only to Thy goodness, I direct  my voice to Thee: God be merciful to me, a sinner; I have sinned against Heaven,  and before Thee, and am unworthy to come into the presence of this Thy holy  and spiritual table, upon which Thy only‐begotten Son, and our Lord Jesus Christ,  is mystically set forth as a sacrifice for me, a sinner, and stained with every spot.”     Following the creed, the following prayer is read: “God and Sovereign of  all, make us, who are unworthy, worthy of this hour, lover of mankind; that  being  pure  from  all  deceit  and  all  hypocrisy,  we  may  be  united  with  one  another  by  the  bond  of  peace  and  love,  being  confirmed  by  the  sanctification  of  Thy divine knowledge through Thine only‐begotten Son, our Lord and Saviour Jesus  Christ,  with  whom  Thou  art  blessed,  together  with  Thy  all‐holy,  and  good,  and  quickening Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.”     Then  right  before  the  clergy  are  to  partake  of  Communion,  the  following is recited: “O Lord our God, the heavenly bread, the life of the universe, I  have  sinned  against  Heaven,  and  before  Thee,  and  am  not  worthy  to  partake  of  Thy  pure  Mysteries;  but  as  a  merciful  God,  make  me  worthy  by  Thy  grace,  without  condemnation  to  partake  of  Thy  holy  body  and  precious  blood,  for  the  remission of sins, and life everlasting.”     After all the clergy and laity have received Communion, this prayer is  read: “O God, who through Thy great and unspeakable love didst condescend  to  the  weakness  of  Thy  servants,  and  hast  counted  us  worthy  to  partake  of  this heavenly table, condemn not us sinners for the participation of Thy pure  Mysteries;  but  keep  us,  O  good  One,  in  the  sanctification  of  Thy  Holy  Spirit,  that  being made holy, we may find part and inheritance with all Thy saints that have been  well‐pleasing to Thee since the world began, in the light of Thy countenance, through  the  mercy  of  Thy  only‐begotten  Son,  our  Lord  and  God  and  Saviour  Jesus  Christ,  with  whom  Thou  art  blessed,  together  with  Thy  all‐holy,  and  good,  and  quickening  Spirit:  for  blessed  and  glorified  is  Thy  all‐precious  and  glorious  name,  Father,  Son,  and Holy Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages.”     From  these  prayers  is  it  not  clear  that  no  one  is  worthy  of  Holy  Communion, whether they have fasted or not, but that it is God’s mercy that  bestows  worthiness  upon  mankind  through  participation  in  the  Mystery  of  Confession  and  receiving  Holy  Communion?  This  was  most  certainly  the  belief  of  the  early  Christians  of  Jerusalem,  quite  contrary  to  Bp.  Kirykos’  ideology of early Christians supposedly being “worthy of communion” because  they supposedly “fasted in the finer and broader sense.”    St. Mark the Evangelist (+25 April, 63), First Bishop of Alexandria, in  his  Divine  Liturgy,  writes:  “O  Sovereign  and  Almighty  Lord,  look  down  from  heaven  on  Thy  Church,  on  all  Thy  people,  and  on  all  Thy  flock.  Save  us  all,  Thine  unworthy  servants,  the  sheep  of  Thy  fold.  Give  us  Thy  peace,  Thy  help,  and  Thy  love,  and  send  to  us  the  gift  of  Thy  Holy  Spirit,  that  with  a  pure  heart  and  a  good  conscience  we  may  salute  one  another  with  an  holy  kiss,  without  hypocrisy,  and  with no hostile purpose, but guileless and pure in one spirit, in the bond of peace  and love, one body and one spirit, in one faith, even as we have been called in one hope  of our calling, that we may all meet in the divine and boundless love, in Christ Jesus  our  Lord,  with  whom  Thou  art  blessed,  with  Thine  all‐holy,  good,  and  life‐creating  Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.”     Later in the Liturgy the following is read: “Be mindful also of us, O Lord,  Thy  sinful  and  unworthy  servants,  and  blot  out  our  sins  in  Thy  goodness  and  mercy.” Again we read: “O holy, highest, awe‐inspiring God, who dwellest among  the saints, sanctify us by the word of Thy grace and by the inspiration of Thy all‐ holy Spirit; for Thou hast said, O Lord our God, Be ye holy; for I am holy. O Word  of God, past finding out, consubstantial and co‐eternal with the Father and the Holy  Spirit,  and  sharer  of  their  sovereignty,  accept  the  pure  song  which  cherubim  and  seraphim, and the unworthy lips of Thy sinful and unworthy servant, sing aloud.”     Thus  it  is  clear  that  whether  he  had  fasted  or  not,  St.  Mark  and  his  clergy and flock still considered themselves unworthy. By no means did they  ever entertain the theory that “they fasted in the finer and broader sense, that is,  they were worthy of communion,” as Bp. Kirykos dares to say. On the contrary,  St. Mark and the early Christians of Alexandria believed any worthiness they  could achieve would be through partaking of the Holy Mysteries themselves.     Thus, St. Mark wrote the following prayer to be read immediately after  Communion: “O Sovereign Lord our God, we thank Thee that we have partaken of  Thy  holy,  pure,  immortal,  and  heavenly  Mysteries,  which  Thou  hast  given  for  our  good,  and  for  the  sanctification  and  salvation  of  our  souls  and  bodies.  We  pray  and  beseech Thee, O Lord, to grant in Thy good mercy, that by partaking of the holy  body and precious blood of Thine only‐begotten Son, we may have faith that  is not ashamed, love that is unfeigned, fullness of holiness, power to eschew  evil  and  keep  Thy  commandments,  provision  for  eternal  life,  and  an  acceptable defense before the awful tribunal of Thy Christ: Through whom and  with  whom be glory and power to Thee, with Thine  all‐holy, good,  and  life‐creating  Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.”    St. Peter the Apostle (+29 June, 67), First Bishop of Antioch, and later  Bishop  of  Old  Rome,  in  his  Divine  Liturgy,  writes:  “For  unto  Thee  do  I  draw  nigh, and, bowing my neck, I pray Thee: Turn not Thy countenance away from me,  neither cast me out from among Thy children, but graciously vouchsafe that I, Thy  sinful  and  unworthy  servant,  may  offer  unto  Thee  these  Holy  Gifts.”  Again  we  read:  “With  soul  defiled  and  lips  unclean,  with  base  hands  and  earthen  tongue,  wholly  in  sins,  mean  and  unrepentant,  I  beseech  Thee,  O  Lover  of  mankind, Saviour of the hopeless and Haven of those in danger, Who callest sinners  to repentance, O Lord God, loose, remit, forgive me a sinner my transgressions,  whether deliberate or unintentional, whether of word or deed, whether committed in  knowledge or in ignorance.”    St.  Thomas  the  Apostle  (+6  October,  72),  Enlightener  of  Edessa,  Mesopotamia, Persia, Bactria, Parthia and India, and First Bishop of Maliapor  in India, in his Divine Liturgy, conveyed through his disciples, St. Thaddeus  (+21  August,  66),  St.  Haggai  (+23  December,  87),  and  St.  Maris  (+5  August,  120), delivered the following prayer in the anaphora which is to be read while  kneeling: “O our Lord and God, look not on the multitude of our sins, and let  not  Thy  dignity  be  turned  away  on  account  of  the  heinousness  of  our  iniquities; but through Thine unspeakable grace sanctify this sacrifice of Thine,  and grant through it power and capability, so that Thou mayest forget our many  sins, and be merciful when Thou shalt appear at the end of time, in the man whom  Thou  hast  assumed  from  among  us,  and  we  may  find  before  Thee  grace  and  mercy,  and be rendered worthy to praise Thee with spiritual assemblies.”     Upon  standing,  the  following  is  read:  “We  thank  Thee,  O  our  Lord  and  God, for the abundant riches of Thy grace to us: we who were sinful and degraded,  on account of the multitude of Thy clemency, Thou hast made worthy to celebrate  the holy Mysteries of the body and blood of Thy Christ. We beg aid from Thee for the  strengthening of our souls, that in perfect love and true faith we may administer Thy  gift  to  us.”  And  again:  “O  our  Lord  and  God,  restrain  our  thoughts,  that  they  wander  not  amid  the  vanities  of  this  world.  O  Lord  our  God,  grant  that  I  may  be  united to the affection of Thy love, unworthy though I be. Glory to Thee, O Christ.”     The priest then reads this prayer on behalf of the faithful: “O Lord God  Almighty,  accept  this  oblation  for  the  whole  Holy  Catholic  Church,  and  for  all  the  pious and righteous fathers who have been pleasing to Thee, and for all the prophets  and apostles, and for all the martyrs and confessors, and for all that mourn, that are  in straits, and are sick, and for all that are under difficulties and trials, and for all the  weak and the oppressed, and for all the dead that have gone from amongst us; then for  all that ask a prayer from our weakness, and for me, a degraded and feeble sinner.  O  Lord  our  God,  according  to  Thy  mercies  and  the  multitude  of  Thy  favours,  look  upon  Thy  people,  and  on  me,  a  feeble  man,  not  according  to  my  sins  and  my  follies,  but  that  they  may  become  worthy  of  the  forgiveness  of  their  sins  through  this  holy  body,  which  they  receive  with  faith,  through  the  grace  of  Thy mercy, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.”     The  following  prayer  also  indicates  that  the  officiators  consider  themselves unworthy but look for the reception of the Holy Mysteries to give  them remission of sins: “We, Thy degraded, weak, and feeble servants who are  congregated in Thy name, and now stand before Thee, and have received with joy the  form  which  is  from  Thee,  praising,  glorifying,  and  exalting,  commemorate  and  celebrate this great, awful, holy, and divine mystery of the passion, death, burial, and  resurrection of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ. And may Thy Holy Spirit come, O  Lord,  and  rest  upon  this  oblation  of  Thy  servants  which  they  offer,  and  bless  and  sanctify it; and may it be unto us, O Lord, for the propitiation of our offences and  the forgiveness of our sins, and for a grand hope of resurrection from the dead, and  for a new life in the Kingdom of the heavens, with all who have been pleasing before  Him.  And  on  account  of  the  whole  of  Thy  wonderful  dispensation  towards  us,  we  shall  render  thanks  unto  Thee,  and  glorify  Thee  without  ceasing  in  Thy  Church,  redeemed  by  the  precious  blood  of  Thy  Christ,  with  open  mouths  and  joyful  countenances:  Ascribing  praise,  honour,  thanksgiving,  and  adoration  to  Thy  holy,  loving, and life‐creating name, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.”     Finally, the following petition indicates quite clearly the belief that the  officiators  and  entire  congregation  are  unworthy  of  receiving  the  Mysteries:  “The  clemency  of  Thy  grace,  O  our  Lord  and  God,  gives  us  access  to  these  renowned, holy, life‐creating, and Divine Mysteries, unworthy though we be.”    St. Luke the Evangelist (+18 October, 86), Bishop of Thebes in Greece,  in  his  Divine  Liturgy,  writes:  “Bless,  O  Lord,  Thy  faithful  people  who  are  bowed  down  before  Thee;  deliver  us  from  injuries  and  temptations;  make  us  worthy  to  receive  these  Holy  Mysteries  in  purity  and  virtue,  and  may  we  be  absolved  and sanctified by them. We offer Thee praise and thanksgiving and to Thine Only‐ begotten  Son  and  to  Thy  Holy  Spirit,  now  and  ever,  and  unto  the  ages  of  ages.  Amen.”     St. Dionysius the Areopagite (+3 October, 96), Bishop of Athens, in his  Divine Liturgy, writes: “Giver of Holiness, and distributor of every good, O Lord,  Who  sanctifiest  every  rational  creature with  sanctification,  which  is from Thee;  sanctify,  through  Thy  Holy  Spirit,  us  Thy  servants,  who  bow  before  Thee;  free  us  from all servile passions of sin, from envy, treachery, deceit, hatred, enmities,  and  from  him,  who  works  the  same,  that  we  may  be  worthy,  holily  to  complete  the  ministry  of  these  life‐giving  Mysteries,  through  the  heavenly  Master, Jesus Christ, Thine Only‐begotten Son, through Whom, and with Whom, is  due to Thee, glory and honour, together with Thine All‐holy, Good and Life‐creating  Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.” Thus, it is God that offers  sanctification  to  mankind,  purifies  mankind  from  sins,  and  makes  mankind  worthy of the Mysteries. This worthiness is not achieved by fasting.    In  the  same  Anaphora  we  read:  “Essentially  existing,  and  from  all  ages;  Whose  nature  is  incomprehensible,  Who  art  near  and  present  to  all,  without  any  change of Thy sublimity; Whose goodness every existing thing longs for and desires;  the intelligible indeed, and creature endowed with intelligence, through intelligence;  those  endowed  with  sense,  through  their  senses;  Who,  although  Thou  art  One  essentially, nevertheless art present with us, and amongst us, in this hour, in which  Thou  hast  called  and  led  us  to  these  Thy  holy  Mysteries;  and  hast  made  us  worthy to stand before the sublime throne of Thy majesty, and to handle the sacred  vessels  of  Thy  ministry  with  our  impure  hands:  take  away  from  us,  O  Lord,  the  cloak of iniquity in which we are enfolded, as from Jesus, the son of Josedec the  High  Priest,  thou  didst  take  away  the  filthy  garments,  and  adorn  us  with  piety  and  justice,  as  Thou  didst  adorn  him  with  a  vestment  of  glory;  that  clothed  with  Thee  alone,  as  it  were  with  a  garment,  and  being  like  temples  crowned  with  glory, we may see Thee unveiled with a mind divinely illuminated, and may feast,  whilst  we,  by  communicating  therein,  enjoy  this  sacrifice  set  before  us;  and  that we may render to Thee glory and praise, together with Thine Only‐begotten Son,  and Thine All‐holy, Good and Life‐creating Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of  ages. Amen.” Once again, worthiness derives from God and not from fasting.    In the same Liturgy we read: “I invoke Thee, O God the Father, have mercy  upon us, and wash away, through Thy grace, the uncleanness of my evil deeds;  destroy, through Thy  mercy, what I have done, worthy of wrath; for I do not 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/contracerycii06/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

January-Newsletter 71%

Today the nature of water is sanctified.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/01/14/january-newsletter/

14/01/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

Elder of Ziyon Haggadah 5769 66%

For You have chosen us and sanctified us from all the nations,2 and You have given us as a heritage Your holy (On Shabbat add:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/03/27/elder-of-ziyon-haggadah-5769/

27/03/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

The Making Of A minister Of The Gospel 63%

[16] God told Jeremiah, said, "Before you was even formed in your mother's womb, I knew you, sanctified you, and ordained you a prophet over the nations,"

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/02/25/the-making-of-a-minister-of-the-gospel/

25/02/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

January-Calendar 63%

(at Local Restaurant) Theophany Sat 5 5:30 - 6:30pm Greek School Resumes 8:45am Orthros 10:00am Divine Liturgy Sunday School 11:30am DOP Loukoumades 4:00pm JOY/GOYA Skating 29 11 Thu King of all, you accepted also to be baptized in the Jordan by the hand of a servant, so that, having sanctified the nature of the waters, you, the sinless one, might make a way for our rebirth through water and Spirit and re-establish us in our original freedom.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/01/14/january-calendar/

14/01/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

w E 18930515 59%

He prayed, “ Sanctify them through thy truth;” and then, making us doubly sure of his meaning, he added, “ thy Word is truth.” Those, there­ fore, who attempt to be sanctified by feelings or by errors or in any other way than by the truth are seeking a good thing in a wrong way;

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/08/04/w-e-18930515/

04/08/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

biblicalworship4 56%

Biblical Worship Copyright Frank Boland, 2016 biblicalhousechurch@gmail.com https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCV1UThsKFyw8Cqa2PJEgvbA https://plus.google.com/100090832098619683662/posts Biblical Worship That I should be the minister of Jesus Christ to the Gentiles, ministering the gospel of God, that the offering up of the Gentiles might be acceptable, being sanctified by the Holy Ghost.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/02/21/biblicalworship4/

21/02/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

THE TRUTH ABOUT EASTER (no live links) - Copy 54%

are all of pagan origin, and sanctified by their adoption in the Church” (Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine, Chapter 8, §6, by Cardinal John Henry Newman).

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/03/30/the-truth-about-easter-no-live-links-copy/

30/03/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

Ramadaan-Shawwal 14-5 54%

“Subbooh and Quddoos (Glorified and Blessed) are Attributes of Allaah, Mighty and Sublime, because He is Glorified and Sanctified by others.” [Lisaan al-Arab] An-Nawawi (Rahimahullaah) said:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/03/22/ramadaan-shawwal-14-5/

22/03/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

CommunionStNicodemusAthos 53%

Frequent Reception of the Holy Mysteries   is Beneficial and Salvific  Part II, Chapter 2 from Concerning Frequent Communion  by St. Nikodemos the Hagiorite      Buy the book from “Uncut Mountain Supply”  http://www.uncutmountainsupply.com/proddetail.asp?prod=cfc     Webmaster Note: This book should be read by all pious Orthodox Christians. It is  not  a  ʺbook  only  for  clergy.ʺ  Rather  it  is  one  that  contains  rich  Patristic  content,  written for all the Faithful, and in a way that moves the heart deeply. It will help you  draw  closer  to  God  by  instructing  you  in  the  two‐fold  action  of  regular  ascetic  struggle  and  reception  of  the  Holy  Mysteries.  This  book  teaches  clearly  and  convincingly that much Grace is given to those who frequently and worthily partake  of Holy Communion. In reading this book you will gain a new appreciation for Holy  Communion; will increase your efforts to watch over yourself more carefully; and will  endeavor to partake whenever possible.    What  follows  is  the  second  of  three  chapters  in  Part  II,  ʺConcerning  Frequent  Communion.ʺ  Take  note  of  the  other  two  chapter  titles:  ʺIs  is  necessary  for  the  Orthodox  to  Partake  frequently  of  the  Divine  body  and  blood of our Lord,ʺ and ʺInfrequent Communion causes great harm.ʺ    Both the soul and the body of the Christian receive great benefit from  the divine Mysteries—before he communes, when he communes, and after he  communes.  Before  one  communes,  he  must  perform  the  necessary  preparation,  namely,  confess  to  his  Spiritual  Father,  have  contrition,  amend  his ways, have compunction, learn to watch over himself carefully, and keep  himself from passionate thoughts (as much as possible) and from every evil.  The more the Christian practices self‐control, prays, and keeps vigil, the more  pious  he  becomes  and  the  more  he  performs  every  other  good  work,  contemplating  what  a  fearful  King  he  will  receive  inside  of  himself.  This  is  even  more  true  when  he  considers  that  he  will  receive  grace  from  Holy  Communion  in  proportion  to  his  preparation.  The  more  often  someone  prepares himself, the more benefit he receives. [93]     When  a  Christian  partakes  of  Communion,  who  can  comprehend  the  gifts and the charismata he receives? Or how can our inept tongue enumerate  them?  For  this  reason,  let  us  again  bring  forward  one  by  one  the  sacred  teachers  of  the  Church  to  tell  us  about  these  gifts,  with  their  eloquent  and  God‐inspired mouths.     Gregory the Theologian says:    When the most sacred body of Christ is received and eaten in a proper  manner, it becomes a weapon against those who war against us, it returns to  God those who had left Him, it strengthens the weak, it causes the healthy to  be  glad,  it  heals  sicknesses,  and  it  preserves  health.  Through  it  we  become  meek and more willing to accept correction, more longsuffering in our pains,  more fervent in our love, more detailed in our knowledge, more willing to do  obedience, and keener in the workings of the charismata of the Spirit. But all  the  opposite  happens  to  those  who  do  not  receive  Communion  in  a  proper  manner. [94]    Those  who  do  not  receive  Communion  frequently  suffer  totally  opposite  things,  because  they  are  not  sealed  with  the  precious  blood  of  our  Lord, as the same Gregory the Theologian says: Then the Lamb is slain, and  with the precious blood are sealed action and reason, that is, habit and mental  activity,  the  sideposts  of  our  doors.  I  mean,  of  course,  by  doors,  the  movements  and  notions  of  the  intellect,  which  are  opened  and  closed  correctly through spiritual vision. [95]     St. Ephraim the Syrian writes:    Brothers,  let  us  practice  stillness,  fasting,  prayer,  and  tears;  gather  together in the Church; work with our hands; speak about the Holy Fathers;  be obedient to the truth; and listen to the divine Scriptures; so that our minds  do  not  become  barren  (and  sprout  the  thorns  of  evil  thoughts).  And  let  us  certainly  make  ourselves  worthy  of  partaking  of  the  divine  and  immaculate  Mysteries,  so  that  our  soul  may  be  purified  from  thoughts  of  unbelief  and  impurity,  and  so  that  the  Lord  will  dwell  within  us  and  deliver  us  from  the  evil one.    The  divine  Cyril  of  Alexandria  says  that,  because  of  divine  Communion,  those  noetic  thieves  the  demons  find  no  opportunity  to  enter  into our souls through the senses:    You  must  consider  your  senses  as  the  door  to  a  house.  Through  the  senses  all  images  of  things  enter  into  the  heart,  and,  through  the  senses,  the  innumerable multitude of lusts pour into it. The Prophet Joel calls the senses  windows,  saying:  They  shall  enter  in  at  our  windows  like  a  thief  (Jl.  2:9),  because  these  windows  have  not  been  marked  with  the  precious  blood  of  Christ. Moreover, the Law commanded that, after the slaughter (of the lamb),  the Israelites were to smear the doorposts and the lintels of their houses with  its blood, showing by this that the precious blood of Christ protects our own  earthly dwelling‐place, which is to say, our body, and that the death brought  about by the transgression is repelled through our enjoyment of the partaking  of life (that is, of life‐giving Communion). Further, through our sealing (with  the blood of Christ) we distance from ourselves the destroyer. [96]    The same divine Cyril says in another place that, through Communion,  we are cleansed from every impurity of soul and receive eagerness and fervor  to  do  good:  The  precious  blood  of  Christ  not  only  frees  us  from  every  corruption,  but  it  also  cleanses  us  from  every  impurity  lying  hidden  within  us, and it does not allow us to grow cold on account of sloth, but rather makes  us fervent in the Spirit. [97]     St. Theodore the Studite wondrously describes the benefit one receives  from frequent Communion:    Tears  and  contrition  have  great  power.  But  the  Communion  of  the  sanctified Gifts, above all, has especially great power and benefit, and, seeing  that you are so indifferent towards it and do not frequently receive it, I am in  wonder and great amazement. For I see that you only receive Communion on  Sundays,  but,  if  there  is  a  Liturgy  on  any  other  day,  you  do  not  commune,  though  when  I  was  in  the  monastery  each  one  of  you  had  permission  to  commune every day, if you so desired. But now the Liturgy is less frequently  celebrated,  and  you  still  do  not  commune.  I  say  these  things  to  you,  not  because  I  wish  for  you  simply  to  commune—haphazardly,  without  preparation (for it is written: But let a man examine himself, and so let him eat  of  the  Bread,  and  drink  of  the  Cup.  For  he  that  eateth  and  drinketh  unworthily,  eateth  and  drinketh  damnation  to  himself,  not  discerning  the  Lords body and blood [1 Cor. 11:2829]). No, I am not saying this. God forbid! I  say  that  we  should,  out  of  our  desire  for  Communion,  purify  ourselves  as  much as possible and make ourselves worthy of the Gift. For the Bread which  came down from heaven is participation in life: If any man eat of this bread,  he shall live for ever: and the bread that I will give is My flesh, which I will  give for the life of the world (Jn. 6:51). Again He says: He that eateth My flesh,  and drinketh My blood, dwelleth in Me, and I in him (Jn. 6:58).     Do you see the ineffable gift? He not only died for us, but He also gives  Himself  to  us  as  food.  What  could  show  more  love  than  this?  What  is  more  salvific  to  the  soul?  Moreover,  no  one  fails  to  partake  every  day  of  the  food  and drink of the common table. And, if it happens that someone does not eat,  he becomes greatly dismayed. And we are not speaking here about ordinary  bread,  but  about  the  Bread  of  life;  not  about  an  ordinary  cup,  but  about  the  Cup  of immortality.  And do we consider  Communion  an  indifferent matter,  entirely unnecessary? How is this thought not irrational and foolish? If this is  how it has been up until now, my children, I ask that we henceforth take heed  to  ourselves,  and,  knowing  the  power  of  the  Gift,  let  us  purify  ourselves  as  much as possible and partake of the sanctified Things. And if it happens that  we  are  occupied  with  a  handicraft,  as  soon  as  we  hear  the  sounding‐board  calling us to Church, let us put our work aside and go partake of the Gift with  great desire. And this (that is, frequent Communion) will certainly benefit us,  for  we  keep  ourselves  pure  through  our  preparation  for  Communion.  If  we  do  not  commune  frequently,  it  is  impossible  for  us  not  to  become  subject  to  the  passions.  Frequent  Communion  will  become  for  us  a  companion  unto  eternal life. [98]     So,  my  brothers,  if  we  practice  what  the  divine  Fathers  have  ordered  and  frequently  commune,  we  not  only  will  have  the  support  and  help  of  divine grace in this short life, but also will have the angels of God as helpers,  and the very Master of the angels Himself. Furthermore, the inimical demons  will be greatly distanced from us, as the divine Chrysostom says:    Let  us  then  return  from  that  Table  like  lions  breathing  fire,  having  become fearsome to the devil, thinking about our Head (Christ) and the love  He  has  shown  for  us.  This  blood  causes  the  image  of  our  King  to  be  fresh  within us, it produces unspeakable beauty, and, watering and nourishing our  soul  frequently,  it  does  not  permit  its  nobility  to  waste  away.  This  blood,  worthily received, drives away demons and keeps them far from us, while it  calls  to  us  the  angels  and  the  Master  of  angels.  For  wherever  they  see  the  Masters blood, devils flee and angels run to gather together. This blood is the  salvation  of  our  souls.  By  it  the  soul  is  washed,  is  made  beautiful,  and  is  inflamed;  and  it  causes  our  intellect  to  be  brighter  than  fire  and  makes  the  soul gleam more than gold....Those who partake of this blood stand with the  angels and the powers that are above, clothed in the kingly robe itself, armed  with spiritual weapons. But I have not yet said anything great by this: for they  are clothed even with the King Himself. [99]    Do you see, my beloved brother, how many wonderful charismata you  receive  if  you  frequently  commune?  Do  you  see  that  with  frequent  Communion  the  intellect  is  illumined,  the  mind  is  made  to  shine,  and  all  of  the powers of the  soul are purified? If  you also  desire  to  kill  the passions  of  the  flesh,  go  to  Communion  frequently  and  you  will  succeed.  Cyril  of  Alexandria  confirms  this  for  us:  Receive  Holy  Communion  believing  that  it  liberates  us  not  only  from  death,  but  also  from  every  illness.  And  this  is  because,  when  Christ  dwells  within  us  through  frequent  Communion,  He  pacifies and  calms the  fierce war  of  the  flesh, ignites  piety toward  God,  and  deadens the passions. [100]     Thus,  without  frequent  Communion  we  cannot  be  freed  from  the  passions and ascend to the heights of dispassion; just as the Israelites, if they  had  not  eaten  the  passover  in  Egypt,  would  not  have  been  able  to  be  freed.  For Egypt means an impassioned life, and if we do not frequently receive the  precious body and blood of our Lord (every day if it be possible), we will not  be able to be freed from the noetic Pharaonians (that is, the passions and the  demons). According to Cyril of Alexandria,     As  long  as  those  of  Israel  were  slaves  to  the  Egyptians,  they  slaughtered  the  lamb  and  ate  the  passover.  This  shows  that  the  soul  of  man  cannot be freed from the tyranny of the devil by any other means except the  partaking of Christ. For He Himself says: If the Son therefore shall make you  free, ye shall be free indeed (Jn. 8:36). [101]    Again St. Cyril says, They had to sacrifice the lamb, being that it was a  type of Christ, for they could not have been freed by any other means. [102]     So if we also desire to flee Egypt, namely, dark and oppressive sin, and  to  flee  Pharaoh,  that  is,  the  noetic  tyrant  (according  to  Gregory  the  Theologian), [103] and inherit the land of the heart and the promise, we must 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/communionstnicodemusathos/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

2016 Staff App 47%

(Check appropriate space) o Saved o Sanctified o Holy Ghost Baptism o Baptized in Water o Church Member List Any Camp Experience you may have List clubs/electives that you have experience and would be willing to teach/conduct:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/04/04/2016-staff-app/

04/04/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

dibai 47%

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/04/13/dibai/

13/04/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

contracerycii02 46%

BELIEF THAT ONE IS MADE “WORTHY” BY THEIR OWN  WORKS RATHER THAN THE MYSTERIES IS PELAGIANISM    Pelagius  (c.  354‐420)  was  a  heretic  from  Britain,  who  believed  that  it  was  possible  for  man  to  be  worthy  or  even  perfect  by  way  of  his  free  will,  without the necessity of grace. In most cases, Pelagius reverted from this strict  form  and  did  not  profess  it.  For  this  reason,  many  of  the  councils  called  to  condemn the false teaching, only condemn the heresy of Pelagianism, but do  not  condemn  Pelagius  himself.  But  various  councils  actually  do  condemn  Pelagius along with Pelagianism. Various Protestants have tried to disparage  the  Orthodox  Faith  by  calling  its  beliefs  Pelagian  or  Semipelagian.  But  the  Orthodox  Faith  is  neither  the  one,  nor  the  other,  but  is  entirely  free  from  Pelagianism.  The  Orthodox  Faith  is  also  free  from  the  opposite  extreme,  namely, Manicheanism, which believes that the world is inherently evil from  its very creation. The Orthodox Faith is the Royal Path. It neither falls to the  right nor to the left, but remains on the straight path, that is, “the Way.” The  Orthodox  Faith does  indeed  believe  that good  works are  essential, but these  are for the purpose of gaining God’s mercy. By no means can mankind grant  himself  “worthiness”  and  “perfection”  by  way  of  his  own  works.  It  is  only  through God’s uncreated grace, light, powers and energies, that mankind can  truly be granted worthiness and perfection in Christ.    The most commonly‐available source of God’s grace within the Church  is through the Holy Mysteries, particularly the Mysteries of Baptism, Chrism,  Absolution and Communion, which are necessary for salvation. Baptism can  only be received once, for it is a reconciliation of the fallen man to the Risen  Man,  where  one  no  longer  shares  in  the  nakedness  of  Adam  but  becomes  clothed with Christ. Chrism can be repeated whenever an Orthodox Christian  lapses into schism or heresy and is being reconciled to the Church. Absolution  can also serve as a method of reconciliation from the sin of heresy or schism  as well as from any personal sin that an Orthodox Christian may commit, and  in receiving the prayer of pardon one is reconciled to the Church. For as long  as  an  Orthodox  Christian  sins,  he  must  receive  this  Mystery  repeatedly  in  order to prepare himself for the next Mystery. Communion is reconciliation to  the  Immaculate  Body  and  Precious  Blood  of  Christ,  allowing  one  to  live  in  Christ. This is the ultimate Mystery, and must be received frequently for one  to experience a life in Christ. For Orthodox Christianity is not a philosophy or  a way of thought, nor is it merely a moral code, but it is the Life of Christ in  man, and the way one can truly live in Christ is through Holy Communion.    Pelagianism in the strictest form is the belief that mankind can achieve  “worthiness” and “perfection” by way of his own free will, without the need  of  God’s  grace  or  the  Mysteries  to  be  the  source  of  that  worthiness  and  perfection. Rather than viewing good works as a method of achieving God’s  mercy,  they  view  the  good  works  as  a  method  of  achieving  self‐worth  and  self‐perfection. The most common understanding of Pelagianism refers to the  supposed “worthiness” of man by way of having a good will or good works  prior  to  receiving  the  Mystery  of  Baptism.  But  the  form  of  Pelagianism  into  which  Bp.  Kirykos  falls  in  his  first  letter  to  Fr.  Pedro,  is  in  regards  to  the  supposed  “worthiness”  of  Christians  purely  by  their  own  work  of  fasting.  Thus, in his first letter to Fr. Pedro, Bp. Kirykos does not mention the Mystery  of  Confession  (or  Absolution)  anywhere  in  the  text  as  a  means  of  receiving  worthiness,  but  attaches  the  worthiness  entirely  to  the  fasting  alone.  Again,  nowhere in the letter does he mention the Holy Communion itself as a source  of  perfection,  but  rather  entertains  the  notion  that  mankind  is  capable  of  achieving such perfection prior to even receiving communion. This is the only  way  one  can  interpret  his  letter,  especially  his  totally  unhistorical  statement  regarding the early Christians, in which he claims: “They fasted in the fine and  broader sense, that is, they were worthy to commune.”    St. Aurelius Augustinus, otherwise known as St. Augustine of Hippo  (+28 August, 430), writes: “It is not by their works, but by grace, that the doers  of the law are justified… Now [the Apostle Paul] could not mean to contradict himself  in  saying,  ‘The  doers  of  the  law  shall  be  justified  (Romans  2:13),’  as  if  their  justification came through their works, and not through grace; since he declares that a  man  is  justified  freely  by  His  grace  without  the  works  of  the  law  (Romans  3:24,28)   intending  by  the  term  ‘freely’  nothing  else  than  that  works  do  not  precede  justification.  For  in  another  passage  he  expressly  says,  ‘If  by  grace,  then  is  it  no  more of works; otherwise grace is no longer grace (Romans 11:6).’ But the statement  that ‘the doers of the law shall be justified (Romans 2:13)’ must be so understood, as  that  we  may  know  that  they  are  not  otherwise  doers  of  the  law,  unless  they  be  justified, so that justification does not subsequently accrue to them as doers of the law,  but  justification  precedes  them  as  doers  of  the  law.  For  what  else  does  the  phrase  ‘being justified’ signify than being made righteous,—by Him, of course, who justifies  the ungodly man, that he may become a godly one instead? For if we were to express a  certain  fact  by  saying,  ‘The  men  will  be  liberated,’  the  phrase  would  of  course  be  understood  as  asserting  that  the  liberation  would  accrue  to  those  who  were  men  already;  but  if  we  were  to  say,  The  men  will  be  created,  we  should  certainly  not  be  understood as asserting that the creation would happen to those who were already in  existence,  but  that  they  became  men  by  the  creation  itself.  If  in  like  manner  it  were  said, The doers of the law shall be honoured, we should only interpret the statement  correctly  if  we  supposed  that  the  honour  was  to  accrue  to  those  who  were  already  doers of the law: but when the allegation is, ‘The doers of the law shall be justified,’  what else does it mean than that the just shall be justified? for of course the doers of  the law are just persons. And thus it amounts to the same thing as if it were said,  The doers of the law shall be created,—not those who were so already, but that they  may  become  such;  in  order  that  the  Jews  who  were  hearers  of  the  law  might  hereby  understand that they wanted the grace of the Justifier, in order to be able to become its  doers also. Or else the term ‘They shall be justified’ is used in the sense of, They shall  be deemed, or reckoned as just, as it is predicated of a certain man in the Gospel, ‘But  he,  willing  to  justify  himself  (Luke  10:29),’—meaning  that  he  wished  to  be  thought  and  accounted  just.  In  like  manner,  we  attach  one  meaning  to  the  statement,  ‘God  sanctifies  His  saints,’  and  another  to  the  words,  ‘Sanctified  be  Thy  name (Matthew 6:9);’  for in the former case we suppose the words to mean that He  makes those to be saints who were not saints before, and in the latter, that the  prayer  would  have  that  which  is  always  holy  in  itself  be  also  regarded  as  holy  by  men,—in  a  word,  be  feared  with  a  hallowed  awe.”  (Augustine  of  Hippo,  Antipelagian Writings, Chapter 45)    Thus the doers of the law are justified by God’s grace and not by their  own good works. The purpose of their own good works is to obtain the mercy  of  God,  but  it  is  God’s  grace  through  the  Holy  Mysteries  that  bestows  the  worthiness  and  perfection  upon  mankind.  Blessed  Augustine  does  not  only  speak  of  this  in  regards  to  the  Mystery  of  Baptism, but  applies  it  also  to  the  Mystery of Communion. Thus he writes of both Mysteries as follows:     “Now  [the  Pelagians]  take  alarm  from  the  statement  of  the  Lord,  when  He  says,  ‘Except  a  man  be  born  again,  he  cannot  see  the  kingdom  of  God  (John  3:3);’  because in His own explanation of the passage He affirms, ‘Except a man be born of  water and of the Spirit, he cannot enter into the kingdom of God (John 3:5).’ And so  they  try to ascribe to unbaptized  infants, by the  merit  of  their innocence, the gift of  salvation  and  eternal  life,  but  at the  same  time,  owing  to  their  being  unbaptized,  to  exclude them from the kingdom of heaven. But how novel and astonishing is such  an  assumption,  as  if  there  could  possibly  be  salvation  and  eternal  life  without heirship with Christ, without the kingdom of heaven! Of course they  have  their  refuge,  whither  to  escape  and  hide  themselves,  because  the  Lord  does  not  say,  Except  a  man  be  born  of  water  and  of  the  Spirit,  he  cannot  have  life,  but—‘he  cannot  enter  into  the  kingdom  of  God.’  If  indeed  He  had  said  the  other,  there  could  have  risen  not  a  moment’s  doubt.  Well,  then,  let  us  remove  the  doubt;  let  us  now  listen to the Lord, and not to men’s notions and conjectures; let us, I say, hear what  the Lord says—not indeed concerning the sacrament of the laver, but concerning the  sacrament of His own holy table, to which none but a baptized person has a right  to approach: ‘Except ye eat my flesh and drink my blood, ye shall have no life  in you  (John  6:53).’ What do we want more? What  answer  to  this can be  adduced,  unless it be by that obstinacy which ever resists the constancy of manifest truth?” (op.  cit., Chapter 26)    Blessed  Augustine  continues  on  the  same  subject  of  how  the  early  Orthodox  Christians  of  Carthage  perceived  the  Mysteries  of  Baptism  and  Communion:  “The  Christians  of  Carthage  have  an  excellent  name  for  the  sacraments,  when  they  say  that  baptism  is  nothing  else  than  ‘salvation,’  and  the  sacrament of the body of Christ nothing else than ‘life.’ Whence, however, was  this derived, but from that primitive, as I suppose, and apostolic tradition, by which  the Churches of Christ maintain it to be an inherent principle, that without baptism  and partaking of the supper of the Lord it is impossible for any man to attain either to  the kingdom of God or to salvation and everlasting life? So much also does Scripture  testify,  according  to  the  words  which  we  already  quoted.  For  wherein  does  their  opinion, who designate baptism by the term salvation, differ from what is written: ‘He  saved us by the washing of regeneration (Titus 3:5)?’ or from Peter’s statement: ‘The  like figure whereunto even baptism doth also now save us (1 Peter 3:21)?’ And what  else do they say who call the sacrament of the Lord’s Supper ‘life,’ than that  which is written: ‘I am the living  bread which came down from heaven (John  6:51);’  and  ‘The  bread  that  I  shall  give  is  my  flesh,  for  the  life  of  the  world  (John  6:51);’  and  ‘Except  ye  eat  the  flesh  of  the  Son  of  man,  and  drink  His  blood, ye shall have no life in you (John 6:53)?’ If, therefore, as so many and such  divine  witnesses  agree,  neither  salvation  nor  eternal  life  can  be  hoped  for  by  any man without baptism and the Lord’s body and blood, it is vain to promise  these blessings to infants without them. Moreover, if it be only sins that separate man  from salvation and eternal life, there is nothing else in infants which these sacraments  can be the means of removing, but the guilt of sin,—respecting which guilty nature it  is written, that “no one is clean, not even if his life be only that of a day (Job  14:4).’ Whence also that exclamation of the Psalmist: ‘Behold, I was conceived in  iniquity; and in sins did my mother bear me (Psalm 50:5)! This is either said in  the  person of our common  humanity, or if of  himself  only David speaks,  it does  not  imply that he was born of fornication, but in lawful wedlock. We therefore ought not  to doubt that even for infants yet to be baptized was that precious blood shed, which  previous to its actual effusion was so given, and applied in the sacrament, that it was  said, ‘This is my blood, which shall be shed for many for the remission of sins  (Matthew 26:28).’  Now they who will not allow that they are under sin, deny that  there is any liberation. For what is there that men are liberated from, if they are held  to be bound by no bondage of sin? (op. cit., Chapter 34)    Now, what of Bp. Kirykos’ opinion that early Christians “fasted in the  fine  and  broader  sense,  that  is,  they  were  worthy  to  commune?”  Is  this  because  they  were  saints?  Were  all  of  the  early  Christians  who  were  frequent  communicants ascetics who fasted “in the finer and broader sense” and were  actual  saints?  Even  if  so,  does  the  Orthodox  Church  consider  the  saints  “worthy” by their act of fasting, or is their act of fasting only a plea for God’s  mercy,  while  God’s  grace  is  what  delivers  the  worthiness?  According  to  Bp.  Kirykos,  the  early  Christians,  whether they  were  saints or  not, “fasted in  the  fine  and  broader  sense,  that  is,  they  were  worthy  to  commune.”  But  is  this  a  teaching  of  Orthodoxy  or  rather  of  Pelagianism?  Is  this  what  the  saints  believed  of  themselves,  that  they  were  “worthy?”  And  if  they  didn’t  believe  they  were  worthy,  was  that  just  out  of  humility,  or  did  they  truly  consider  themselves unworthy? Blessed Augustine of Hippo, one of the champions of  his time against the heresy of Pelagianism, writes:    “In that, indeed, in the praise of the saints, they will not drive us with the zeal  of  that  publican  (Luke  18:10‐14)  to  hunger  and  thirst  after  righteousness,  but  with  the vanity of the Pharisees, as it were, to overflow with sufficiency and fulness; what  does  it  profit  them  that—in  opposition  to  the  Manicheans,  who  do  away  with  baptism—they  say  ‘that  men  are  perfectly  renewed  by  baptism,’  and  apply  the  apostle’s testimony for this,—‘who testifies that, by the washing of water, the Church  is made holy and spotless from the Gentiles (Ephesians 5:26),’—when, with a proud  and perverse meaning, they put forth their arguments in opposition to the prayers of  the Church itself. For they say this in order that the Church may be believed after holy  baptism—in which is accomplished the forgiveness of all sins—to have no further sin;  when, in opposition to them, from the rising of the sun even to its setting, in all  its members it cries to God, ‘Forgive us our debts (Matthew 6:12).’ But if they  are  interrogated  regarding  themselves  in  this  matter,  they  find  not  what  to  answer.  For if they should say that they have no sin, John answers them, that ‘they deceive  themselves, and the  truth  is not in them (1 John 1:8).’  But if they  confess their  sins, since they wish themselves to be members of Christ’s body, how will that body,  that  is,  the  Church,  be  even  in  this  time  perfectly,  as  they  think,  without  spot  or  wrinkle, if its members without falsehood confess themselves to have sins? Wherefore  in baptism all sins are forgiven, and, by that very washing of water in the word, the  Church is set forth in Christ without spot or wrinkle (Ephesians 5:27);  and unless it  were baptized, it would fruitlessly say, ‘Forgive us our debts,’ until it be brought to  glory, when there is in it absolutely no spot or wrinkle.” (op. cit., Chapter 17).    Again,  in  his  chapter  called  ‘The  Opinion  of  the  Saints  Themselves  About  Themselves,’  Blessed  Augustine  writes:  “It  is  to  be  confessed  that  ‘the  Holy Spirit, even in the old times,’ not only ‘aided good dispositions,’ which even they  allow, but that it even made them good, which they will not have. ‘That all, also, of the  prophets and apostles or saints, both evangelical and ancient, to whom God gives His  witness, were righteous, not in comparison with the wicked, but by the rule of virtue,’  is not doubtful. And this is opposed to the Manicheans, who blaspheme the patriarchs  and  prophets;  but  what  is  opposed  to  the  Pelagians  is,  that  all  of  these,  when  interrogated  concerning  themselves  while  they  lived  in  the  body,  with  one  most  accordant voice would answer, ‘If we should say that we have no sin, we deceive  ourselves, and the truth is not in us (1 John 1:8).’ ‘But in the future time,’ it is  not to be denied ‘that there will be a reward as well of good works as of evil, and that  no  one  will  be  commanded  to  do  the  commandments  there  which  here  he  has  contemned,’  but  that  a  sufficiency  of  perfect  righteousness  where  sin  cannot  be,  a  righteousness which is here hungered and thirsted after by the saints, is here hoped for 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/contracerycii02/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

w E 18810300 44%

"For both he that sanctifieth and they who are sanctified are all of o-ne for whick caUJJe he is not ashamed to call them brethren."

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/08/04/w-e-18810300/

04/08/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

finished 43%

He harbored his fair share of cruelty in his heart, sure, but for moments like these, he was as gentle as a curved flower petal dancing in the breeze flowing over the Sanctified Meadows.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2019/01/18/finished/

18/01/2019 www.pdf-archive.com

BobDylanExcerpts 42%

Then again it may have just been standard writer’s frustration that caused him to rip out those sanctified pages, ball them up, and throw them in the trash bin of oblivion.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2012/04/20/bobdylanexcerpts/

20/04/2012 www.pdf-archive.com