PDF Archive

Easily share your PDF documents with your contacts, on the Web and Social Networks.

Share a file Manage my documents Convert Recover PDF Search Help Contact


Search


PDF Archive search engine
Last database update: 27 October at 13:36 - Around 210000 files indexed.

Show results per page

Results for «seems»:


Total: 9000 results - 0.05 seconds

O'Hara Surface reading 100%

In his 1950 essay “Projected Verse”, Charles Olsen argues “ONE PERCEPTION MUST IMMEDIATELY AND DIRECTLY LEAD TO A FURTHER PERCEPTION.”1 It is worth noting how Olsen locates writer’s perception as existing in continuum, which seems to emphasize a more fluid reading of poetry.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/04/01/o-hara-surface-reading/

01/04/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

BeliefDependenceAndDisagreement 98%

With this information, it seems clear that you do not have reason ​ to favor ​p.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/02/19/beliefdependenceanddisagreement/

19/02/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

CanIndifferenceVindicateInduction 94%

    Fool Me Once: Can Indifference Vindicate Induction?  Roger White (2015) sketches an ingenious new solution to the problem of induction. It argues on  a priori ​  grounds that the world is more likely to be induction­friendly than induction­unfriendly.  The argument relies primarily on the principle of indifference, and, somewhat surprisingly,  assumes little else. If inductive methods could be vindicated in anything like this way, it would  be quite a groundbreaking result. But there are grounds for pessimism about the envisaged  approach. This paper shows that in the crucial test cases White concentrates on, the principle of  indifference actually renders induction no more accurate than random guessing. It then diagnoses  why the indifference­based argument seems so intuitively compelling, despite being ultimately  unsound.  1 An Indifference­Based Strategy  White begins by imagining that we are “apprentice demons” tasked with devising an  induction­unfriendly world ​  – a world where inductive methods tend to be unreliable. To  simplify, we imagine that there is a single binary variable that we control (such as whether the  sun rises over a series of consecutive days). So, in essence, the task is to construct a binary  sequence such that – if the sequence were revealed one bit at a time – an inductive reasoner  would fare poorly at predicting its future bits. This task, it turns out, is surprisingly difficult. To  see this, it will be instructive to consider several possible strategies for constructing a sequence  that would frustrate an ideal inductive predictor.  Immediately, it is clear that we should avoid uniformly patterned sequences, such as:   00000000000000000000000000000000   or  01010101010101010101010101010101.  ­1­      Sequences like these are quite kind to induction. Our inductive reasoner would quickly latch onto  the obvious patterns these sequences exhibit. A more promising approach, it might seem, is to  build an apparently patternless sequence:  00101010011111000011100010010100  ​ But, importantly, while induction will not be particularly ​ ​ reliable at predicting the terms of this  sequence, it will not be particularly ​unreliable here either. Induction would simply be silent  about what a sequence like this contains. As White puts it, “ In order for... induction to be  applied, our data must contain a salient regularity of a reasonable length” (p. 285). When no  pattern whatsoever can be discerned, presumably, induction is silent. (We will assume that the  inductive predictor is permitted to suspend judgment whenever she wishes.) The original aim  was not to produce an induction­neutral sequence, but to produce a sequence that elicits errors  from induction. So an entirely patternless sequence will not suffice. Instead, the  induction­unfriendly sequence will have to be more devious, building up seeming patterns and  then violating them. As a first pass, we can try this:  00000000000000000000000000000001  Of course, this precise sequence is relatively friendly to induction. While our inductive predictor  will undoubtedly botch her prediction of the final bit, it is clear that she will be able to amass a  long string of successes prior to that point. So, on balance, the above sequence is quite kind to  induction – though not maximally so.   In order to render induction unreliable, we will need to elicit more errors than correct  predictions. We might try to achieve this as follows:  00001111000011110000111100001111  ­2­      The idea here is to offer up just enough of a pattern to warrant an inductive prediction, before  pulling the rug out – and then to repeat the same trick again and again. Of course, this precise  sequence would not necessarily be the way to render induction unreliable: For, even if we did  manage to elicit an error or two from our inductive predictor early on, it seems clear that she  would eventually catch on to the exceptionless higher­order pattern governing the behavior of  the sequence.  The upshot of these observations is not that constructing an induction­unfriendly sequence is  impossible. As White points out, constructing such a sequence should be possible, given any  complete description of how exactly induction works (p. 287). Nonetheless, even if there are a  few special sequences that can frustrate induction, it seems clear that such sequences are fairly  few and far between. In contrast, it is obviously very easy to ​corroborate induction (i.e. to  construct a sequence rendering it thoroughly reliable). So induction is relatively  un­frustrate­able. And it is worth noting that this property is fairly specific to induction. For  example, consider an inferential method based on the gambler’s fallacy, which advises one to  predict whichever outcome has occurred less often, overall. It would be quite easy to frustrate  this method thoroughly (e.g. ​00000000…​).   So far, we have identified a highly suggestive feature of induction. To put things roughly, it  can seem that:   * Over a large number of sequences, induction is thoroughly reliable.   * Over a large number of sequences, induction is silent (and hence, neither reliable nor unreliable).  * Over a very small number of sequences (i.e. those specifically designed to thwart induction),  induction is unreliable (though, even in these cases, induction is still silent much of the time).  ­3­      Viewed from this angle, it can seem reasonable to conclude that there are ​a priori grounds for  confidence that an arbitrary sequence is not induction­unfriendly. After all, there seem to be far  more induction­friendly sequences than induction­unfriendly ones. If we assign equal probability  to every possible sequence, then the probability that an arbitrary sequence will be  induction­friendly is going to be significantly higher than the probability that it will be  induction­unfriendly. So a simple appeal to the principle of indifference seems to generate the  happy verdict that induction can be expected to be more reliable than not, at least in the case of  binary sequences.   Moreover, as White points out, the general strategy is not limited to binary sequences. If we  can show ​a priori that induction over a binary sequence is unlikely to be induction­unfriendly,  then it’s plausible that a similar kind of argument can be used to show that we are justified in  assuming that an arbitrary ​world is not induction­unfriendly. If true, this would serve to fully  vindicate induction.  2 Given Indifference, Induction Is not Reliable   However, there are grounds for pessimism about whether the strategy is successful even in the  simple case of binary sequences. Suppose that, as a special promotion, a casino decided to offer  Fair Roulette. The game involves betting $1 on a particular color – black or red – and then  spinning a wheel, which is entirely half red and half black. If wrong, you lose your dollar; if  right, you get your dollar back and gain another. If it were really true that induction can be  expected to be more reliable than not over binary sequences, it would seem to follow that  induction can serve as a winning strategy, over the long term, in Fair Roulette. After all, multiple  spins of the wheel produce a binary sequence of reds and blacks. And all possible sequences are  ­4­      equally probable. Of course, induction cannot be used to win at Fair Roulette – past occurrences  of red, for example, are not evidence that the next spin is more likely to be red. This suggests that  something is amiss. Indeed, it turns out that no inferential method – whether inductive or  otherwise – can possibly be expected to be reliable at predicting unseen bits of a binary  sequence, if the principle of indifference is assumed. This can be shown as follows.  Let ​S be an unknown binary sequence of length ​n. ​S is to be revealed one bit at a time,  starting with the first.   S: ​? ? ? ? ? ? … ?​ ​:​S    n bits  Let ​f be an arbitrary predictive function that takes as input any initial subsequence of ​S and  outputs a prediction for the next bit: ‘0’, ‘1’, or ‘suspend judgment’.   A  predictive  function’s  accuracy  is measured as follows: +1 for each correct prediction; ­1 for  each  incorrect  prediction;  0  each  time ‘suspend judgment’ occurs. (So the maximum accuracy of  a  function  is  ​n;  the  minimum  score  is  –​n.)  Given  a  probability  distribution  over  all  possible  sequences,  the  ​expected  accuracy  of  a  predictive  function  is  the  average  of  its  possible  scores  weighted by their respective probabilities.  Claim: ​If we assume indifference (i.e. if we assign equal probability to every possible sequence), then  – no matter what ​S is – each of​ f’s predictions​ will be expected to contribute 0 to ​f’s accuracy. And, as  a consequence of this, ​f has 0 expected accuracy more generally.  Proof: ​For some initial subsequences, ​f will output ‘suspend judgment’. The contribution of such  predictions will inevitably be 0. So we need consider only those cases where ​f makes a firm  prediction (i.e. ‘0’ or ‘1’; not ‘suspend judgment’).  Let ​K be a ​k­length initial subsequence for which ​f makes a firm prediction about the bit in   ­5­ 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/02/19/canindifferencevindicateinduction/

19/02/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

SelfReflection3 94%

This required more prompting than I thought it would, and it seems that students were indifferent to my questioning them about the exam.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/04/28/selfreflection3/

28/04/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

FoolMeOnce 94%

After discussing this result, we then diagnose why the indifference-based argument seems so intuitively compelling, despite being ultimately unsound.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/02/19/foolmeonce/

19/02/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

EliminateStressAndAnxiety 94%

If you would like to make money giving this book away please click here for details INTRODUCTION It seems like you hear it all the time from nearly every one you know – “I’m SO stressed out!” Pressures abound in this world today.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2013/03/20/eliminatestressandanxiety/

20/03/2013 www.pdf-archive.com

st0ry 93%

CHAPTER ONE Chapter Blinking his eyes violently, he awoke.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/10/30/st0ry/

30/10/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

Thompson - Representing the Other 93%

Unlike some first encounters between cultures, this meeting seems to have been entirely amicable.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/08/18/thompson-representing-the-other/

18/08/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

Netflix Excerpt 92%

Her death becomes an incentive for her brother—the true opponent for Hemlock Grove’s supernatural community, it seems—to come to Hemlock Grove in the second season.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/09/18/netflix-excerpt/

18/09/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

Is unveiling a F1 with delay a problem 92%

There were worries in the past few years, but right now Vijay Mallya seems to have taken over things on his own.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2011/01/06/is-unveiling-a-f1-with-delay-a-problem/

06/01/2011 www.pdf-archive.com

Demons Or Aliens 92%

Aliens Possibly Possessed by Demons - can engage in physical abductions - can perform physical rapes, with trace material left behind - have technology, ships - technology seems cruder, ships not clean and well lit - abductions appear to have no long-term strategy, rather they are charades for sadistic torture - they are opportunists, seem to prey on the gullible, spiritually exhausted, or the openly inviting.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/04/08/demons-or-aliens/

08/04/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

March4 Mascha 92%

This required more prompting than I thought it would, and it seems that students were indifferent to my questioning them about the exam.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/05/02/march4-mascha/

02/05/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

thesublimecity 92%

  Towards an Urban Sublime: Expressing the Inexpressible in Urban Romantic Poetry  As the industrial revolution brought about the rapid urbanization of cities throughout  Europe, writers who were previously concerned with the aesthetics of nature and the countryside  found themselves grappling with an entirely new set of poetic and philosophical concerns. The  teeming crowds, towering structures and spectacular sights that they encountered in the novel  environment of the city incited in them feelings of overwhelming terror and awe akin to those  typically associated with the romantic “sublime.” However, as we look more closely at the  city­focused works of poets like Baillie, Wordsworth and Hood, we begin to see that there is a  fundamental difference between the “natural” sublime of earlier romantic poetry and the “urban”  sublime of the city poem. Whereas the poet’s sublime experience in nature is typically associated  with some sort of catharsis or transcendence, forcing man to come to terms with the limitations  of his own humanity, the urban sublime instead incites a feelings of wonder and disgust at the  incredible potential of that humanity itself, or—as Anne Janowitz put it in her essay ​ The  Artifactual Sublime​ —it forces man to confront “the self as if it were not the self; to experience  the madeness of the human world as if it were different stuff than the labour of persons.”   While it is true that, as Janowitz notes, this “mis­recognition” of the sublime object often  resulted in the experience of “romantic alienation,” I argue that the use of sublime language and  natural imagery also acted as a sort of coping mechanism for their writers. Through the  experience of the “urban” sublime is of course intrinsically linked to feelings of terror and  isolation, the fact that these poets were describing particularly urban experiences in terms of  something formerly associated with nature helped them to bridge the gap between the urban  world and the natural one. This technique, therefore, served the dual purpose of expressing the        unfamiliarity of this new landscape and familiarizing it, allowing these poets to discover, as  Wordsworth put it, that the underlying “spirit of Nature” was still upon them, even in this “vast  receptacle.”   In Thomas Hood’s delightfully erratic ​ Moral Reflections on the Cross of Saint Paul’s​ , we  find a perfect example of the struggle many poets faced to familiarize the sublimely  overwhelming urban environment. Hood’s speaker—who is presumably a tourist visiting  London for the first time—is hilariously unable to produce any original or insightful  “reflections” about the complex cityscape he sees spread out before him, and resorts instead to  stringing together a bizarre collection of references and metaphors that don’t seem to fit together  into a cohesive vision.   The speaker’s numerous allusions to “classic” works of literature suggest that he feels a  longing to express the “profound” nature of the landscape he is viewing, but even these  references come off as disjointed and confused. In the poem’s first stanza, the speaker compares  the ball of Saint Paul’s cathedral to Mount Olympus, the home of the gods in Greek mythology.  He then immediately moves on to reference a figure from Roman mythology, when he proclaims  that he is sitting “Among the gods, by Jupiter!” The speaker’s thoughts turn again towards the  literary in the third stanza, when—looking down at the city crowds beneath him—the speaker  feels the need to question the nature of man. “What is life?” He asks himself, and answers with  an apparent reference to a now cliche line from William Shakespeare's ​ As You Like it​ : “And what  is life? And all its ages— / There’s seven stages!” Before he is able to offer any sort of “real”  philosophical inquiry into what he means by this, however, the speaker distracts himself by  naming off the seven neighborhoods of London, and never returns to the subject.         While this random misfiring of half­baked references helps develop the speaker’s  delightfully zany personality, it also gestures at the bewilderment he feels upon taking in the  sprawling landscape of London from above. Though the speaker cannot adequately express the  profound emotional impact of this landscape in his own words—and it is clear that he does not  have the educational background to substantiate even an insightful literary comparison—he still  feels the urge to grasp for images and analogies that he associates with grandiosity and power.  This attempt—and failure—to express the inexpressible is a common struggle in the literature of  the sublime, and in Joanna Baillie’s poem ​ London​ —which was written around the same time as  Hood’s piece—we are introduced to yet another speaker who cannot quite find the right words to  describe the overwhelming urban landscape. The difference here is that Baillie’s speaker is more  familiar with the concept of the natural sublime, and she uses the language associated with it to  explore the ways that the experience of urban sublime is both related to and separate from the  experience of the sublime in nature.  The poem’s initial description of the city—in which we find the city viewed again from  above, from the hills of Hampstead “through the clear air”—presents the urban space as a rather  innocuous, almost quaint vision. The London skyline seems to the speaker a “goodly sight,” and  its structures are rendered in relation to familiar human figures. The spires of St. Paul’s cathedral  flank the structure “in kindred grace, like twain of sisters dear,” the “ridgy roofs” of the city’s  buildings sit amicably “side by side.” The entire vision is “softly tinted” by the distance of the  viewer, _____. However, as the air begins to grow denser, and “moistened winds” prevail, the  city’s landscape transfigures into something far more menacing. The “thin soft haze” of the  poem’s first section becomes a “grand panoply of smoke arrayed,” and the dome of St. Paul’s        Cathedral—which is now surrounded not by quaint spires, but by “heavy” clouds that sail around  its imposing dome—seems “a curtain gloom / Connecting heaven and earth,—a threatening sign  of doom.” The shifting weather strips the humanity from the city’s landscape, and the language  of the speaker quickly shifts to the language that references the natural sublime. The combination  of almost ethereal    However, this use of sublime language also allows the speaker to articulate the  differences between the urban world and the natural one. Though the speaker seems compelled  to compare the structure to prodigious natural figures (she states that the cathedral “might some  lofty alpine peak be deemed”) it becomes apparent that these metaphors are not quite sufficient  to describe the sight she is witnessing. Because its form reveals “man’s artful structure,” (and by  extension the “artful structure” of man’s society), the cathedral cannot be viewed as totally  natural. Instead, it is referred to as “more than natural,” and seems to transcend the boundaries of  both humanity and nature as it first “connects heaven and hearth” and then, a few lines later  seems “far removed from Earth.”   This somewhat confused description demonstrates the speaker’s complex feelings about  the urban landscape. Though she knows one thing for certain about this cathedral—“She is  sublime”—the speaker cannot quite find the language she needs to describe the sense of the  particularly “urban” sublime she is experiencing. She knows the cathedral is a product of  mankind, and that the power that it is imbued with is intrinsically linked with the oppressive  church that it represents and the often corrupt society that it is a part of. Part of the reason that  the church looks seems to her so terrifying is certainly the fact that entering the streets of the city  means succumbing to the dominance of the church, the government, and society as a whole.         Language has always failed to fully express the sublime experience, however, and the  speaker’s attempts to conflate the urban sublime of the city with the natural sublime simply  demonstrates a desire to give a recognizable form to the terror she is experiencing—in order to  truly become what Lyotard calls an “expressive witness to the inexpressible,” the speaker must  carry thought and rationality to their logical conclusions, and for a romantic poet the world can  best be rationalized and understood in terms of the rural. In contrast to Hood’s speaker, whose  manic metaphor­hopping was a symptom of a mind unprepared to grapple with the urban  landscape’s complexities, Baillie’s speaker logically considers the unfamiliar in terms of her own  experience, and makes the urban feel, in a way, like an extension of nature.   This blending of the natural and the urban is epitomized in the final portion of Baillie’s  poem, when the viewpoint shifts to the perspective of a “distant traveller.” From afar, this  traveller is able to view the London in its entirety, and finds himself awestruck by the stars in the  “luminous canopy” above the city that seem to be “cast up from myriads of lamps that shine /  Along her streets in many a starry line.” The “flood of human life in motion” creates a noise that  sounds to the traveller like the “voice of a tempestuous ocean,” and he finds his soul filled with a  “sad but pleasing awe” upon hearing it. These magnificent sights, which seem at once human  and natural, express the rich suggest that the city is capable of igniting in the human soul the  same complex emotions that a sublime natural splendor might.  Wordsworth took this idea to its ultimate conclusion as he navigated the ​ bacchanalian  chaos that is St. Bartholomew’s fair at the conclusion of ​ The Prelude, Book Seven. ​ In  Wordsworth’s poem, we are not viewing London from above, but from the very trenches of the  city, and the sublimity he is experiencing comes not from the contemplation of the urban   

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/04/20/thesublimecity/

20/04/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

Market-Research1 91%

Eurostat and Danske Bank Markets Falling commodity prices still expected to keep inflation low in 2014-15 If more action is needed, a deposit cut seems to be the preferred tool at the ECB, but as this measure has both advantages and disadvantages any hints on other measures should be followed closely.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/01/08/market-research1/

08/01/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

a twilit severance of vessel & thought, a work in progress 91%

So it comes down to an inclination, a disposition it seems, for one to choose one or the other.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/10/10/a-twilit-severance-of-vessel-thought-a-work-in-progress/

10/10/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

Of Death 91%

You fail even to comprehend that as it seems.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/06/25/of-death/

25/06/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

4 Things to Know About Panic Attacks 91%

But the other moment, you calm down and everything seems all hunky-dory, as if nothing had happened.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/08/01/4-things-to-know-about-panic-attacks/

01/08/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

Reverse Phone Number Research - Tips On How To Discover An Unknown Contact Number 91%

You may discover in which the phone owner lives however you're curious what the location seems like.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2012/09/28/reverse-phone-number-research-tips-on-how-to-discover-an-unknown-contact-number/

28/09/2012 www.pdf-archive.com

best of mini and maximus1223 91%

Healthy is actually additional essential compared to seems As well as viewed another person exactly who ripped the identical clothing from another person, however it did not appear practically as good?

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/08/04/best-of-mini-and-maximus1223/

04/08/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

Cubed Circle Newsletter Issue 13 91%

In all honesty I don’t think that the WWE programming will be at the same level after WrestleMania, if the Rock and Jericho stay after and continue to work, that’s a different story, but as of right now, it seems that unless a big angle is put into place post Mania.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2012/01/06/cubed-circle-newsletter-issue-13/

06/01/2012 www.pdf-archive.com