Search


PDF Archive search engine
Last database update: 17 May at 11:24 - Around 76000 files indexed.


Show results per page

Results for «seraphim»:


Total: 14 results - 0.042 seconds

RomaniansReBaptismEng 100%

The Position of Bp. Kirykos’ Romanian Counterparts  Regarding Re‐Baptism is Extremely Hypocritical    The  Romanians  who  are  in  communion  with  Bp.  Kirykos  require  all  New  Calendarists,  Florinites,  Glicherians,  ROCOR  faithful,  etc,  to  be  re‐ baptized,  even  if  their  baptism  was  performed  in  the  canonical  manner,  by  triple  immersion  and  invocation  of  the  Holy  Trinity.  They  have  even  begun  re‐baptizing  people  who  had  already  been  received  into  the  Matthewite  Church  by  chrismation.  Thus,  in  Cyprus,  several  laymen  who  had  been  received  even  decades  ago  by  chrismation,  are  now  being  rebaptized  by  the  Romanian bishop Parthenios! So then, one might ask, all of these years were  they communing or not? If they were communing as members of the Church,  then how is it that they are now being regarded as foreign to the Church and  in need of baptism? This isn’t Orthodox ecclesiology, it is blasphemy against  the Holy Spirit, a crime that the Lord has declared to be unforgivable.    But  this  very  act  of  rebaptizing  by  the  Romanians  is  extremely  hypocritical considering their own origins. The truth is that according to their  own  principles,  they  themselves  are  very  much  in  need  of  being rebaptized.  This is because the Romanian bishops derive their Apostolic Succession from  Bishop  Victor  Leu,  who  was  consecrated  in  1949  by  three  bishops  of  the  Russian  Orthodox  Church  Abroad.  The  main  consecrating  hierarch  who  actually  passed  the  Apostolic  Succession  (for  the  other  two  were  mere  witnesses, as is the case), was Metropolitan Seraphim (Lyade) of Berlin.     Metropolitan Seraphim was actually born into a Protestant family and  was “baptized” by sprinkling in the Lutheran Church. When he was received  into  the  Russian  Orthodox  Church,  he  was  received  by  mere  chrismation,  despite not  having the  correct form  of  baptism. He was  then  elevated to  the  deaconate and priesthood within the Russian Orthodox Church. However, on  1st  of  September, 1923, he was  “consecrated”  as  a “bishop”  by  Renovationist  hierarchs who had been anathematized a year earlier by Patriarch St. Tikhon.  In  1929,  the  Renovationist  “bishop”  Seraphim  Lade  was  received  into  communion  by  the  Russian  Orthodox  Church  Abroad,  but  he  was  not  reordained nor was a cheirothesia read on him, but he was received by mere  repentance.  Thus,  according  to  the  strict  point  of  view,  Metropolitan  Seraphim  Lyade  was  both  un‐baptized  and  un‐consecrated!  Yet  this  Metropolitan  Seraphim  is  the  very  source  of  priesthood  of  the  Romanian  hierarchs. Thus, if they have their origins from a bishop who was un‐baptized  and  un‐consecrated,  how  is  their  baptism  and  priesthood  valid?  If  the  Romanian hierarchs are so strict that they reject economia, should they not be  the first to re‐enter the baptismal font before they dare to re‐baptize others? 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/romaniansrebaptismeng/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

Colourful Plaguebearers 98%

Seraphim sepia and water then guilliman blue.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/06/06/colourful-plaguebearers/

06/06/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

Anathema1983eng 85%

ANATHEMA AGAINST ECUMENISM    ʺTo those who attack the Church of Christ by teaching that Christʹs Church is  divided into so‐called ʺbranchesʺ which differ in doctrine and way of life, or  that the Church does not exist visibly, but will be formed in the future when  all branches or sects, or denominations, and even religions will be united into  one  body;  and  who  do  not  distinguish  the  priesthood  and  mysteries  of  the  Church  from  those  of  heretics,  but  say  that  the  baptism  and  eucharist  of  heretics  is  effectual  for  salvation;  therefore,  to  those  who  knowingly  have  communion  with  these  aforementioned  heretics  or  who  advocate,  disseminate, or defend their new heresy, commonly called ecumenism, under  the  pretext  of  brotherly  love  or  the  supposed  unification  of  separated  Christians, Anathema!ʺ    The Synod of Bishops of the Russian Orthodox Church Outside of Russia    President:     + PHILARET, Metropolitan of New York and Eastern America    Members:    + SERAPHIM, Archbishop of Chicago and Detroit  + ATHANASIUS, Archbishop of Buenos Aires and Argentina‐Paraguay  + VITALY, Archbishop of Montreal and Canada  + ANTHONY, Archbishop of Los Angeles and Texas  + ANTHONY, Archbishop of Geneva and Western Europe  + ANTHONY, Archbishop of San Francisco and Western America  + SERAPHIM, Archbishop of Caracas and Venezuela  + PAUL, Archbishop of Sydney and Australia‐New Zealand  + LAURUS, Archbishop of Syracuse and Holy Trinity Monastery  + CONSTANTINE, Bishop of Richmond and Britain  + GREGORY, Bishop of Washington and Florida  + MARK, Bishop of Berlin and Germany  + ALYPY, Bishop of Cleveland and Ohio 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/anathema1983eng/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

WA 1000Lichter2017 Flyer 82%

Kolumban mit Christa Strambach zieht durch die Stadt (Start Johanneskirche) 18.30 Uhr Feuerschau Seraphim „Wings of Fire“ Marktplatz Buchladen Schupfnudeln Marktgasse Radsportverein Wendlingen Crêpes und Marktgasse Glühwein/Punsch Marquardt Uhren Glühwein und Schmuck Marktgasse Max &

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/11/02/wa-1000lichter2017-flyer/

02/11/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

rigasche-stadtblatter-1890-ocr-ta 73%

Seraphim, Aus Alt-Rigas Bmgerlhum 75.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/04/18/rigasche-stadtblatter-1890-ocr-ta/

18/04/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

JasonMagers TAMDS Charts 50%

Bm D G Em Cherubim and seraphim falling down before Thee, Bm D G A Bm (Down) Who was, and is, and evermore shall be.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/02/02/jasonmagers-tamds-charts/

02/02/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

rigasche-stadtblatter-1875-ocr-ta 45%

Anstalt des Bischofs Seraphim zur Erziehung der Töchter von Geist­ lichen 451.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/04/18/rigasche-stadtblatter-1875-ocr-ta/

18/04/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

contracerycii05 37%

FROM THE PRAYERS OF PREPARATION FOR COMMUNION  REGARDING “WORTHINESS” OF THE HOLY MYSTERIES    In the prayers for preparation for Holy Communion, written by several  different  Holy  Fathers,  we  find  the  repetition  of  this  belief  in  utter  unworthiness for Holy Communion, whether one has fasted or not. Note also,  that among the Fathers who wrote these prayers are St. Basil the Great and St.  John Chrysostom, the greatest luminaries among the Anatolian‐Cappadocian  Fathers. Yet these most awesome and splendid examples of sanctity, whether  they fasted “in the finer and broader sense,” as Metropolitan Kirykos calls it,  by  no  means  considered  themselves  “worthy  to  commune.”  For  it  is  not  abstaining from foods that make one worthy, but rather abstaining from sins,  and all men have sinned save Christ who alone is perfect, and save Theotokos  who  is  the  purest  temple  of  the  Lord  from  her  very  childhood,  but  was  hallowed, sanctified and consecrated by God at the hour of the Annunciation.  The rest of us are sinners, even the saints, but their holiness is owing to God’s  mercy upon them due to their purity of life, and their theosis is owing to the  grace of God that overshadowed them, as they lived every day in Christ.     The  fact that the saints were  not  worthy  in and of  themselves, but  by  the  grace  of  God,  can  be  well  understood  by  reading  their  prayers  of  preparation  for  Holy  Communion.  For  these  prayers  were  written  by  saints  who,  in  their  shortcomings,  were  also  sinners;  and  they  wrote  these  prayers  for  the  sake  of  sinners  who,  just  like  them,  strive  by  God’s  grace  to  become  saints. Thus, in the second troparion in the preparation for Holy Communion  we read: “How can I, the unworthy one, shamelessly dare to partake of Thy Holy  Gifts?”  In  the  last  few  troparia  in  the  service  of  preparation  for  Holy  Communion, we read: “Into the splendor of Thy Saints how shall I, the unworthy  one, enter?...” and again “O Man‐befriending Master, Lord Jesus my God, let not  these holy Gifts be unto me for judgment through mine unworthiness…”    St. Basil the Great (+ 1 January, 397), in his first prayer of preparation  for Holy Communion, writes: “… For I have sinned, O Lord, I have sinned against  Heaven  and  before  Thee,  and  I  am  not  worthy  to  gaze  upon  the  height  of  Thy  glory… Wherefore, though I am unworthy of both heaven and earth, and even of this  transient life…” In his second prayer we read: “I know, O Lord, that I partake of  Thine immaculate Body and precious Blood unworthily, and that I am guilty, and  eat and drink judgment to myself, not discerning the Body and Blood of Thee, my  Christ and God…”     St.  John  Chrysostom  (+14  September,  407),  in  his  first  prayer  of  preparation  for  Holy  Communion,  writes:  “O  Lord  my  God,  I  know  that  I  am  not worthy, nor sufficient, that Thou shouldest come under the roof of the house of  my soul, for all is desolate and fallen, and Thou hast not in me a place worthy to  lay Thy head…” In his third prayer we read: “O Lord Jesus Christ my God, loose,  remit,  forgive,  and  pardon  the  failings,  faults,  and  offences  which  I,  Thy  sinful,  unprofitable,  and  unworthy  servant  have  committed  from  my  youth,  up  to  the  present day and hour…”    If in any place in the prayers of preparation for Holy Communion there  is  a  statement  of  worthiness  within  man,  it  is  claimed  that  Christ  and  the  Mysteries  themselves  are  the  source  of  that  worthiness.  By  no  means  are  mankind’s own works, such as fasting, considered to make one worthy. Thus,  Blessed Chrysostom writes: “I believe, O Lord, and I confess that thou art truly the  Christ, the Son of the living God, who didst come into the world to save sinners,  of whom I am chief. And I believe that this is truly Thine own immaculate Body,  and  that  this is truly Thine  own precious Blood. Wherefore I  pray  thee, have mercy  upon me and forgive my transgressions both voluntary and involuntary, of word and  of deed, of knowledge and of ignorance; and make me worthy to partake without  condemnation of Thine immaculate Mysteries, unto remission of my sins and  unto life everlasting. Amen.”    St.  Symeon  the  Translator  (+9  November,  c.  950)  writes:  “…O  Christ  Jesus, Wisdom and Peace and Power of God, Who in Thy assumption of our nature  didst suffer Thy life‐giving and saving Passion, the Cross, the Nails, the Spear, and  Death,  mortify  all  the  deadly  passions  of  my  body.  Thou  Who  in  Thy  burial  didst spoil the dominions of hell, bury with good thoughts my evil schemes and  scatter  the  spirits  of  wickedness.  Thou  Who  by  Thy  life‐giving  Resurrection  on  the  third  day  didst  raise  up  our  fallen  first  Parent,  raise  me  up  who  am  sunk  in  sin  and  suggest  to  me  ways  of  repentance.  Thou  Who  by  Thy  glorious  Ascension  didst deify our nature which Thou hadst assumed and didst honor it by Thy session at  the  right  hand  of  the  Father,  make  me  worthy  by  partaking  of  Thy  holy  Mysteries of a place at Thy right hand among those who are saved. Thou Who  by  the  descent  of  the  Spirit,  the  Paraclete,  didst  make  Thy  holy  Disciples  worthy  vessels, make me also a recipient of His coming. Thou Who art to come again to  judge  the  World  with  justice,  grant  me  also  to  meet  Thee  on  the  clouds,  my  Maker  and  Creator,  with  all  Thy  Saints,  that  I  may  unendingly  glorify  and  praise  Thee with Thy Eternal Father and Thy all‐holy and good and life‐giving Spirit, now  and ever, and to the ages of ages. Amen.”    St. Symeon the New Theologian (+12 March, 1022) wrote a poem that  clearly explains how a communicant must regard himself as utterly unworthy  to  receive  the  Holy Body and  Blood  of  the  Lord,  and  entirely hope  in  God’s  mercy:  From sullied lips,   From an abominable heart,   From an unclean tongue,   Out of a polluted soul,   Receive my prayer, O my Christ.   Reject me not,   Nor my words, nor my ways,   Nor even my shamelessness,   But give me courage to say   What I desire, my Christ.   And even more, teach me   What to do and say.   I have sinned more than the harlot…  And all my sins   Take from me, O God of all,   That with a clean heart,   Trembling mind   And contrite spirit   I may partake of Thy pure   And all‐holy Mysteries   By which all who eat and drink Thee   With sincerity of heart   Are quickened and deified…  Therefore I fall at Thy feet   And fervently cry to Thee:   As Thou receivedst the Prodigal   And the Harlot who drew near to Thee,   So have compassion and receive me,   The profligate and the prodigal,   As with contrite spirit   I now draw near to Thee.   I know, O Saviour, that no other   Has sinned against Thee as I,   Nor has done the deeds   That I have committed.   But this again I know   That not the greatness of my offences   Nor the multitude of my sins   Surpasses the great patience   Of my God,   And His extreme love for men.   But with the oil of compassion   Those who fervently repent   Thou dost purify and enlighten   And makest them children of the light,   Sharers of Thy Divine Nature…    St.  John  Damascene  (+4  December,  749),  in  his  first  prayer  of  preparation  for  Holy  Communion,  thus  writes:  “O  Lord  and  Master  Jesus  Christ, our God, who alone hath power to forgive the sins of men, do thou, O Good  One who lovest mankind, forgive all the sins that I have committed in knowledge or  in  ignorance,  and  make  me  worthy  to  receive  without  condemnation  thy  divine, glorious, immaculate and life‐giving Mysteries; not unto punishment  or  unto  increase  of  sin;  but  unto  purification,  and  sanctification  and  a  promise of thy Kingdom and the Life to come; as a protection and a help to  overthrow the adversaries, and to blot out my many sins. For thou art a God of  Mercy  and  compassion  and  love  toward  mankind,  and  unto  Thee  we  ascribe  glory  together  with  the  Father  and  the  Holy  Spirit;  now  and  ever,  and  unto  ages  of  ages.  Amen.”     In his second prayer he writes: “I stand before the gates of thy Temple, and  yet I refrain not from my evil thoughts. But do thou, O Christ my God, who didst  justify  the  publican,  and  hadst  mercy  on  the  Canaanite  woman,  and  opened  the gates of Paradise to the thief; open unto me the compassion of thy love toward  mankind, and receive me as I approach and touch thee, like the sinful woman and  the woman with the issue of blood; for the one, by embracing thy feet received the  forgiveness  of  her  sins,  and  the  other  by  but  touching  the  hem  of  thy  garment  was  healed. And I, most sinful, dare to partake of thy whole Body. Let me not be consumed  but receive me as thou didst receive them, and enlighten the perceptions of my  soul, consuming the accusations of my sins; through the intercessions of Her that  without stain gave Thee birth, and of the heavenly Powers; for thou art blessed unto  ages of ages. Amen.”    While waiting in line to receive Holy Communion, the following verses  of the Blessed Translator are read:  Behold I approach for Divine Communion.  O Creator, let me not be burnt by communicating,  For Thou art Fire which burns the unworthy.  But purify me from every stain.   Tremble, O man, when you see the deifying Blood,  For it is coal that burns the unworthy.  The Body of God both deifies and nourishes;  It deifies the spirit and wondrously nourishes the mind.      The  following  troparion  clearly  expresses  with  what  mindset  and  manner  one  must  approach  the  Mysteries.  Let  it  not  be  thought  that  a  Christian is meant to state the following simply as an act of false humility. On  the contrary, the Christian must truly deny any sense of his self‐worth in the  eyes  of  Christ,  and  must  therefore  submit  himself  entirely  to  Christ’s  judgment, praying that the Lord will judge according to his great mercy and  not according to our sins. The troparion reads: “Of thy Mystic Supper, O Son of  God, accept me today as a communicant; for I will not speak of thy Mystery to Thine  enemies, neither will I give thee a kiss as did Judas; but like the thief will I confess  thee: Remember me, O Lord, in Thy Kingdom. Remember me, O Master, in Thy  Kingdom. Remember me, O Holy One, when Thou comest into Thy Kingdom.” After  a few other troparia, the following prayer is read: “Sovereign Lover of men, Lord  Jesus  my  God,  let  not  these  Holy  Things  be  to  me  for  judgment  through  my  being  unworthy,  but  for  the  purification  and  sanctification  of  my  soul  and  body, and as a pledge of the life and kingdom to come. For it is good for me to  cling to God and to place in the Lord my hope of salvation.”    As  one  approaches  the  Holy  Chalice,  one  should  crosswise  fold  his  hands over his chest, and reflect in his mind the following petition: “Neither  unto  judgement,  nor  unto  condemnation  be  my  partaking  of  thy  Holy  Mysteries,  O  Lord,  but  unto  the  healing  of  soul  and  body.”  When  the  priest  administers the Holy Communion he announces: “The servant of God, [name],  partakes of the precious, most holy and most pure Body and Blood of our Lord, God  and Saviour, Jesus Christ, for the remission of sins and life everlasting. Amen.”  Then, the communicant kisses the bottom of the chalice, thinking of himself as  the harlot who kissed the feet of the Lord while anointing them with precious  myrrh and her penitent tears, while contemplating the Seraphim who touched  a  burning  coal  to  the  mouth  of  Isaiah,  saying:  “Behold,  This  hath  touched  thy  lips, and will take away thine iniquities, and will purge thy sins (Isaiah 6:7).” 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/contracerycii05/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

MetaxakisAnglicans1918 36%

Project Canterbury  The Episcopal and Greek Churches  Report of an Unofficial Conference on Unity  Between Members of the Episcopal Church in America and  His Grace, Meletios Metaxakis, Metropolitan of Athens,  And His Advisers.  October 26, 1918.  New York: Department of Missions, 1920    PREFACE  THE desire for closer communion between the Eastern Orthodox Church and  the various branches of the Anglican Church is by no means confined to the  Anglican  Communion.  Many  interesting  efforts  have  been  made  during  the  past two centuries, a resume of which may be found in the recent publication  of  the  Department  of  Missions  of  the  Episcopal  Church  entitled  Historical  Contact Between the Anglican and Eastern Orthodox Churches.  The most significant approaches of recent times have been those between the  Anglican  and  the  Russian  and  the  Greek  Churches;  and  of  late  the  Syrian  Church of India which claims foundation by the Apostle Saint Thomas.  Evdokim, the last Archbishop sent to America by the Holy Governing Synod  of Russia in the year 1915, brought with him instructions that he should work  for a closer understanding with the Episcopal Church in America. As a result,  a series of conferences were held in the Spring of 1916. At these conferences  the  question  of  Anglican  Orders,  the  Apostolical  Canons  and  the  Seventh  Oecumenical Council were discussed. The Russians were willing to accept the  conclusions  of  Professor  Sokoloff,  as  set  forth  in  his  thesis  for  the  degree  of  Doctor of Divinity, approved by the Holy Governing Synod of Russia. In this  thesis  he  proved  the  historical  continuity  of  Anglican  Orders,  and  the  intention to conform to the practice of the ancient Church. He expressed some  suspicion concerning the belief of part of the Anglican Church in the nature of  the sacraments, but maintained that this could not be of sufficient magnitude  to prevent the free operation of the Holy Spirit. The Russian members of the  conference,  while  accepting  this  conclusion,  pointed  out  that  further  steps  toward inter‐communion could only be made by an oecumenical council. The  following is quoted from the above‐mentioned publication:  The  Apostolical  Canons  were  considered  one  by  one.  With  explanations  on  both sides, the two Churches were found to be in substantial agreement.  In  connection  with  canon  forty‐six,  the  Archbishop  stated  that  the  Russian  Church  would  accept  any  Anglican  Baptism  or  any  other  Catholic  Baptism.  Difficulties  concerning  the  frequent  so‐called  ʺperiods  of  fastingʺ  were  removed by rendering the word ʺfastingʺ as ʺabstinence.ʺ Both Anglicans and  Russians  agreed  that  only  two  fast‐days  were  enjoined  on  their  members‐‐ Ash‐Wednesday and Good Friday.  The  Seventh  Oecumenical  Council  was  fully  discussed.  Satisfactory  explanations  were  given  by  both  sides,  but  no  final  decision  was  reached.  Before  the  conference  could  be  reconvened,  the  Archbishop  was  summoned  to a General Conference of the Orthodox Church at Moscow.  During  the  past  year  the  Syrian  Church  and  the  Anglican  Church  in  India  have  been  giving  very  full  and  careful  consideration  to  the  question  of  Reunion and it is hoped that some working basis may be speedily established.  As  a  preliminary  to  this  present  conference,  the  writer  addressed,  with  the  approval  of  the  members  of  the  conference  representing  the  Episcopal  Church,  a  letter  to  the  Metropolitan  which  became  the  basis  of  discussion.  This letter has been published as one of the pamphlets of this series under the  title, An Anglican Programme for Reunion. These conferences were followed by  a series of other conferences in England which took up the thoughts contained  in the American programme, as is shown in the following quotation from the  preface to the above‐mentioned letter:  At  the  first  conference  the  American  position  was  reviewed  and  it  was  mutually agreed that the present aim of such conference was not for union in  the  sense  of  ʺcorporate  solidarityʺ  based  on  the  restoration  of  intercommunion,  but  through  clear  understanding  of  each  otherʹs  position.  The  general  understanding  was  that  there  was  no  real  bar  to  communion  between  the  two  Churches  and  it  was  desirable  that  it  should  be  permitted,  but that such permission could only be given through the action of a General  Council.  The  third  of  these  series  of  conferences  was  held  at  Oxford.  About  forty  representatives  of  the  Anglican  Church  attended.  The  questions  of  Baptism  and  Confirmation  were  considered  by  this  conference.  It  was  shown  that,  until  the  eighteenth  century,  re‐baptism  of  non‐Orthodox  was  never  practiced. It was then introduced as a protest against the custom in the Latin  Church  of  baptizing,  not  only  living  Orthodox,  but  in  many  cases,  even  the  dead.  Under  order  of  Patriarch  Joachim  III,  it  has  become  the  Greek  custom  not to re‐baptize Anglicans who have been baptized by English priests. In the  matter  of  Confirmation  it  was  shown  that  in  the  cases  of  the  Orthodox,  the  custom of anointing with oil, called Holy Chrism, differs to some extent from  our  Confirmation.  It  is  regarded  as  a  seal  of  orthodoxy  and  should  not  be  viewed  as  repetition  of  Confirmation.  Even  in  the  Orthodox  Church  lapsed  communicants must receive Chrism again before restoration.  The  fourth  conference  was  held  in  the  Jerusalem  Chapel  of  Westminster  Abbey, under the presidency of the Bishop of Winchester. This discussion was  confined  to  the  consideration  of  the  Seventh  Oecumenical  Council.  It  is  not  felt by the Greeks that the number of differences on this point touch doctrinal  or  even  disciplinary  principles.  The  Metropolitan  stated  that  there  was  no  difficulty  tin  the  subject.  From  what  he  had  seen  of  Anglican  Churches,  he  was  assured  as  to  our  practice.  He  further  stated  that  he  was  strongly  opposed  to  the  practice  of  ascribing  certain  virtues  and  power  to  particular  icons, and that he himself had written strongly against this practice, and that  the Holy Synod of Greece had issued directions against it.ʺ  Those  brought  in  contact  with  the  Metropolitan  of  Athens,  and  those  who  followed  the  work  of  the  Commission  on  Faith  and  Order  can  testify  to  the  evident desire of the authorities of the East for closer union with the Anglican  Church as soon as conditions permit.  This  report  is  submitted  because  there  is  much  loose  thinking  and  careless  utterance on every side concerning the position of the Orthodox Church and  the  relation  of  the  Episcopal  Church  to  her  sister  Churches  of  the  East.  It  seems  not  merely  wise,  but  necessary,  to  place  before  Church  people  a  document showing how the minds of leading thinkers of both Episcopal and  Orthodox  Churches  are  approaching  this  most  momentous  problem  of  Intercommunion and Church Unity.    THE CONFERENCE  BY  common  agreement,  representatives  of  the  Greek  Orthodox  Church  and  delegates from the American Branch of the Anglican and Eastern Association  and  of  the  Christian  Unity  Foundation  of  the  Episcopal  Church,  met  in  the  Bible  Room  of  the  Library  of  the  General  Theological  Seminary,  Saturday,  October 26, 1918, at ten oʹclock. There were present as representing the Greek  Orthodox  Church:  His  Grace,  the  Most  Reverend  Meletios  Metaxakis,  Metropolitan  of  Greece;  the  Very  Reverend  Chrysostomos  Papadopoulos,  D.D.,  Professor  of  the  University  of  Athens  and  Director  of  the  Theological  Seminary  ʺRizariosʺ;  Hamilcar  Alivisatos,  D.D.,  Director  of  the  Ecclesiastical  Department  of  the  Ministry  of  Religion  and  Education,  Athens,  and  Mr.  Tsolainos,  who  acted  as  interpreter.  The  Episcopal  Church  was  represented  by  the  Right  Reverend  Frederick  Courtney;  the  Right  Reverend  Frederick  J.  Kinsman, Bishop of Delaware; the Right Reverend James H. Darlington, D.D.,  Bishop  of  Harrisburg;  the  Very  Reverend  Hughell  Fosbroke,  Dean  of  the  General Theological Seminary; the Reverend Francis J. Hall, D.D., Professor of  Dogmatic  Theology  in  the  General  Theological  Seminary;  the  Reverend  Rockland T. Homans, the Reverend William Chauncey Emhardt, Secretary of  the  American  Branch  of  the  Anglican  and  Eastern  Association  and  of  the  Christian  Unity  Foundation;  Robert  H.  Gardiner,  Esquire,  Secretary  of  the  Commission  for  a  World  Conference  on  Faith  and  Order;  and  Seraphim  G.  Canoutas, Esquire. The Right Reverend Edward M. Parker, D.D.,  Bishop of New Hampshire, telegraphed his inability to be present. His Grace  the Metropolitan presided over the Greek delegation and Dr. Alivisatos acted  as  secretary.  The  Right  Reverend  Frederick  Courtney  presided  over  the  American delegation and the Reverend W. C. Emhardt acted as secretary.  Bishop Courtney opened the conference with prayer and made the following  remarks:  ʺOur  brethren  of  the  Greek  Church,  as  well  as  the  Anglican,  have  received copies of the letter to His Grace which our secretary has drawn up;  and which lies before us this morning. It is clear to all those who have taken  active  part  in  efforts  to  draw  together,  that  it  is  of  no  use  any  longer  to  congratulate each  other  upon points on  which  we agree, so  long as we hold  back those things on which we differ. The points on which we agree are not  those which have caused the separation, but the things concerning which we  differ.  So  long  as  we  assume  that  the  conditions  which  separate  us  now  are  the same as those which have held us apart, we are in line for removing those  things  which  separate  us.  We  are  making  the  valleys  to  be  filled  and  the  mountains  to  be  brought  low  and  making  possible  a  revival  of  the  spirit  of  unity.  It  is  in  the  hope  of  effecting  this  that  we  are  gathered  together.  Doctrinal differences underlie the things that differentiate us from each other.  The  proper  way  to  begin  this  conference  would  be  to  ask  the  Greeks  what  they think of some of the propositions laid down in the letter, beginning first  with the question of the Validity of Anglican Orders, and then proceeding to  the ʺFilioque Clauseʺ in the Creed and other topics suggested.  ʺWill  His  Grace  kindly  state  what  is  his  view  concerning  the  Validity  of  Anglican Orders?ʺ  The Metropolitan: ʺI am greatly moved indeed, and it is with feelings of great  emotion  that  I  come  to  this  conference  around  the  table  with  such  learned  theologians  of  the  Episcopal  Church.  Because  it  is  the  first  time  I  have  been  given the opportunity to express, not only my personal desire, but the desire  of  my  Church,  that  we  may  all  be  one.  I  understand  that  this  conference  is  unofficial.  Neither  our  Episcopal  brethren,  nor  the  Orthodox,  officially  represent  their  Churches.  The  fact,  however,  that  we  have  come  together  in  the spirit of prayer and love to discuss these questions, is a clear and eloquent  proof  that  we  are  on  the  desired  road  to  unity.  I  would  wish,  that  in  discussing these questions of ecclesiastical importance in the presence of such  theological experts,  that I were  as  well equipped  for  the  undertaking  as you  are.  Unfortunately,  however,  from  the  day  that  I  graduated  from  the  Theological Seminary at Jerusalem, I have been absorbed in the great question  of the day, which has been the salvation of Christians from the sword of the  invader of the Orient.  ʺUnfortunately, because  we  have  been confronted  in  the  Near East with this  problem of paramount importance, we leaders have not had the opportunity  to  think  of  these  equally  important  questions.  The  occupants  of  three  of  the  ancient thrones of Christendom, the Patriarch of Constantinople, the Patriarch  of  Antioch  and  the  Patriarch  of  Jerusalem,  have  been  constantly  confronted  with  the  question  of  how  to  save  their  own  fold  from  extermination.  These  patriarchates represent a great number of Orthodox and their influence would  be  of  prime  importance  in  any  deliberation.  But  they  have  not  had  time  to  send their bishops to a round‐table conference to deliberate on the questions  of  doctrine.  A  general  synod,  such  as  is  so  profitably  held  in  your  Church  when you come together every three years, would have the same result, if we  could  hold  the  same  sort  of  synod  in  the  Near  East.  A  conference  similar  to  the one held by your Church was planned by the Patriarch of Constantinople  in  September,  1911,  but  he  did  not  take  place,  owing  to  command  of  the  Sultan that the bishops who attended would be subject to penalty of death.  ʺIn 1906, when the Olympic games took place in Athens, the Metropolitan of  Drama, now of Smyrna, passed through Athens. That was sufficient to cause  an  imperative  demand  of  the  Patriarch  of  Constantinople  that  the  Metropolitan  be  punished,  and  in  consequence  he  was  transferred  from  Drama  to  Smyrna.  From  these  facts  you  can  see  under  what  conditions  the  evolution of the Greek Church has been taking place.  ʺAs I have stated in former conversations with my brethren of the Episcopal  Church, we hope that, by the Grace of God, freedom and liberty will come to  our race, and our bishops will be free to attend such conferences as we desire.  I assure you that a great spirit of revival will be inaugurated and give proof of  the revival of Grecian life of former times.  ʺThe question of the freedom of the territory to be occupied in the Near East is  not merely a question of the liberty of the people and the individual, but also 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/metaxakisanglicans1918/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

Chronical Guide VtM Pgs 41-45 .indd 35%

A cult of Gnostic Hermetecism following their inhuman messiah, the Tremere’s central chantry, a cathedral-like mountain temple in the Carpathians, was a mystical wonder, holding magickal relics, a mystic garden of paradise, and even a physical doorway into the Astral Heavens, guarded by seraphim, sphinxes, elementals and golems.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2011/04/14/chronical-guide-vtm-pgs-41-45-indd/

14/04/2011 www.pdf-archive.com

Can we talk with angels 33%

In medieval angelology, angels constituted the lowest of the nine celestial orders (seraphim, cherubim, thrones, dominations or dominions, virtues, powers, principalities or princedoms, archangels, and angels).

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/06/21/can-we-talk-with-angels/

21/06/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

contracerycii06 32%

FROM THE ANAPHORAE OF THE ANCIENT CHURCH  REGARDING “WORTHINESS” OF HOLY COMMUNION    This  can  also  be  demonstrated  by  the  secret  prayers  within  Divine  Liturgy.  From  the  early  Apostolic  Liturgies,  right  down  to  the  various  Liturgies  of  the  Local  Churches  of  Jerusalem,  Antioch,  Alexandria,  Constantinople,  Rome,  Gallia,  Hispania,  Britannia,  Cappadocia,  Armenia,  Persia, India and Ethiopia, in Liturgies that were once vibrant in the Orthodox  Church,  prior  to  the  Nestorian,  Monophysite  and  Papist  schisms,  as  well  as  those  Liturgies  still  in  common  use  today  among  the  Orthodox  Christians  (namely,  the  Liturgies  of  St.  John  Chrysostom,  St.  Basil  the  Great  and  the  Presanctified Liturgy of St. Gregory the Dialogist), the message is quite clear  in all the mystic prayers that the clergy and the laity are referred to as entirely  unworthy, and truly they are to believe they are unworthy, and that no action  of  their  own can make them worthy  (i.e.  not  even  fasting), but  that  only the  Lord’s  mercy  and  grace  through  the  Gifts  themselves  will  allow  them  to  receive communion without condemnation. To demonstrate this, let us begin  with the early Apostolic Liturgies, and from there work our way through as  many of the oblations used throughout history, as have been found in ancient  manuscripts, among them those still offered within Orthodoxy today.    St.  James  the  Brother‐of‐God  (+23  October,  62),  First  Bishop  of  Jerusalem, begins his anaphora as follows: “O Sovereign Lord our God, condemn  me  not,  defiled with a multitude  of sins: for,  behold, I  have  come to  this Thy divine  and heavenly mystery, not as being worthy; but looking only to Thy goodness, I direct  my voice to Thee: God be merciful to me, a sinner; I have sinned against Heaven,  and before Thee, and am unworthy to come into the presence of this Thy holy  and spiritual table, upon which Thy only‐begotten Son, and our Lord Jesus Christ,  is mystically set forth as a sacrifice for me, a sinner, and stained with every spot.”     Following the creed, the following prayer is read: “God and Sovereign of  all, make us, who are unworthy, worthy of this hour, lover of mankind; that  being  pure  from  all  deceit  and  all  hypocrisy,  we  may  be  united  with  one  another  by  the  bond  of  peace  and  love,  being  confirmed  by  the  sanctification  of  Thy divine knowledge through Thine only‐begotten Son, our Lord and Saviour Jesus  Christ,  with  whom  Thou  art  blessed,  together  with  Thy  all‐holy,  and  good,  and  quickening Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.”     Then  right  before  the  clergy  are  to  partake  of  Communion,  the  following is recited: “O Lord our God, the heavenly bread, the life of the universe, I  have  sinned  against  Heaven,  and  before  Thee,  and  am  not  worthy  to  partake  of  Thy  pure  Mysteries;  but  as  a  merciful  God,  make  me  worthy  by  Thy  grace,  without  condemnation  to  partake  of  Thy  holy  body  and  precious  blood,  for  the  remission of sins, and life everlasting.”     After all the clergy and laity have received Communion, this prayer is  read: “O God, who through Thy great and unspeakable love didst condescend  to  the  weakness  of  Thy  servants,  and  hast  counted  us  worthy  to  partake  of  this heavenly table, condemn not us sinners for the participation of Thy pure  Mysteries;  but  keep  us,  O  good  One,  in  the  sanctification  of  Thy  Holy  Spirit,  that  being made holy, we may find part and inheritance with all Thy saints that have been  well‐pleasing to Thee since the world began, in the light of Thy countenance, through  the  mercy  of  Thy  only‐begotten  Son,  our  Lord  and  God  and  Saviour  Jesus  Christ,  with  whom  Thou  art  blessed,  together  with  Thy  all‐holy,  and  good,  and  quickening  Spirit:  for  blessed  and  glorified  is  Thy  all‐precious  and  glorious  name,  Father,  Son,  and Holy Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages.”     From  these  prayers  is  it  not  clear  that  no  one  is  worthy  of  Holy  Communion, whether they have fasted or not, but that it is God’s mercy that  bestows  worthiness  upon  mankind  through  participation  in  the  Mystery  of  Confession  and  receiving  Holy  Communion?  This  was  most  certainly  the  belief  of  the  early  Christians  of  Jerusalem,  quite  contrary  to  Bp.  Kirykos’  ideology of early Christians supposedly being “worthy of communion” because  they supposedly “fasted in the finer and broader sense.”    St. Mark the Evangelist (+25 April, 63), First Bishop of Alexandria, in  his  Divine  Liturgy,  writes:  “O  Sovereign  and  Almighty  Lord,  look  down  from  heaven  on  Thy  Church,  on  all  Thy  people,  and  on  all  Thy  flock.  Save  us  all,  Thine  unworthy  servants,  the  sheep  of  Thy  fold.  Give  us  Thy  peace,  Thy  help,  and  Thy  love,  and  send  to  us  the  gift  of  Thy  Holy  Spirit,  that  with  a  pure  heart  and  a  good  conscience  we  may  salute  one  another  with  an  holy  kiss,  without  hypocrisy,  and  with no hostile purpose, but guileless and pure in one spirit, in the bond of peace  and love, one body and one spirit, in one faith, even as we have been called in one hope  of our calling, that we may all meet in the divine and boundless love, in Christ Jesus  our  Lord,  with  whom  Thou  art  blessed,  with  Thine  all‐holy,  good,  and  life‐creating  Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.”     Later in the Liturgy the following is read: “Be mindful also of us, O Lord,  Thy  sinful  and  unworthy  servants,  and  blot  out  our  sins  in  Thy  goodness  and  mercy.” Again we read: “O holy, highest, awe‐inspiring God, who dwellest among  the saints, sanctify us by the word of Thy grace and by the inspiration of Thy all‐ holy Spirit; for Thou hast said, O Lord our God, Be ye holy; for I am holy. O Word  of God, past finding out, consubstantial and co‐eternal with the Father and the Holy  Spirit,  and  sharer  of  their  sovereignty,  accept  the  pure  song  which  cherubim  and  seraphim, and the unworthy lips of Thy sinful and unworthy servant, sing aloud.”     Thus  it  is  clear  that  whether  he  had  fasted  or  not,  St.  Mark  and  his  clergy and flock still considered themselves unworthy. By no means did they  ever entertain the theory that “they fasted in the finer and broader sense, that is,  they were worthy of communion,” as Bp. Kirykos dares to say. On the contrary,  St. Mark and the early Christians of Alexandria believed any worthiness they  could achieve would be through partaking of the Holy Mysteries themselves.     Thus, St. Mark wrote the following prayer to be read immediately after  Communion: “O Sovereign Lord our God, we thank Thee that we have partaken of  Thy  holy,  pure,  immortal,  and  heavenly  Mysteries,  which  Thou  hast  given  for  our  good,  and  for  the  sanctification  and  salvation  of  our  souls  and  bodies.  We  pray  and  beseech Thee, O Lord, to grant in Thy good mercy, that by partaking of the holy  body and precious blood of Thine only‐begotten Son, we may have faith that  is not ashamed, love that is unfeigned, fullness of holiness, power to eschew  evil  and  keep  Thy  commandments,  provision  for  eternal  life,  and  an  acceptable defense before the awful tribunal of Thy Christ: Through whom and  with  whom be glory and power to Thee, with Thine  all‐holy, good,  and  life‐creating  Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.”    St. Peter the Apostle (+29 June, 67), First Bishop of Antioch, and later  Bishop  of  Old  Rome,  in  his  Divine  Liturgy,  writes:  “For  unto  Thee  do  I  draw  nigh, and, bowing my neck, I pray Thee: Turn not Thy countenance away from me,  neither cast me out from among Thy children, but graciously vouchsafe that I, Thy  sinful  and  unworthy  servant,  may  offer  unto  Thee  these  Holy  Gifts.”  Again  we  read:  “With  soul  defiled  and  lips  unclean,  with  base  hands  and  earthen  tongue,  wholly  in  sins,  mean  and  unrepentant,  I  beseech  Thee,  O  Lover  of  mankind, Saviour of the hopeless and Haven of those in danger, Who callest sinners  to repentance, O Lord God, loose, remit, forgive me a sinner my transgressions,  whether deliberate or unintentional, whether of word or deed, whether committed in  knowledge or in ignorance.”    St.  Thomas  the  Apostle  (+6  October,  72),  Enlightener  of  Edessa,  Mesopotamia, Persia, Bactria, Parthia and India, and First Bishop of Maliapor  in India, in his Divine Liturgy, conveyed through his disciples, St. Thaddeus  (+21  August,  66),  St.  Haggai  (+23  December,  87),  and  St.  Maris  (+5  August,  120), delivered the following prayer in the anaphora which is to be read while  kneeling: “O our Lord and God, look not on the multitude of our sins, and let  not  Thy  dignity  be  turned  away  on  account  of  the  heinousness  of  our  iniquities; but through Thine unspeakable grace sanctify this sacrifice of Thine,  and grant through it power and capability, so that Thou mayest forget our many  sins, and be merciful when Thou shalt appear at the end of time, in the man whom  Thou  hast  assumed  from  among  us,  and  we  may  find  before  Thee  grace  and  mercy,  and be rendered worthy to praise Thee with spiritual assemblies.”     Upon  standing,  the  following  is  read:  “We  thank  Thee,  O  our  Lord  and  God, for the abundant riches of Thy grace to us: we who were sinful and degraded,  on account of the multitude of Thy clemency, Thou hast made worthy to celebrate  the holy Mysteries of the body and blood of Thy Christ. We beg aid from Thee for the  strengthening of our souls, that in perfect love and true faith we may administer Thy  gift  to  us.”  And  again:  “O  our  Lord  and  God,  restrain  our  thoughts,  that  they  wander  not  amid  the  vanities  of  this  world.  O  Lord  our  God,  grant  that  I  may  be  united to the affection of Thy love, unworthy though I be. Glory to Thee, O Christ.”     The priest then reads this prayer on behalf of the faithful: “O Lord God  Almighty,  accept  this  oblation  for  the  whole  Holy  Catholic  Church,  and  for  all  the  pious and righteous fathers who have been pleasing to Thee, and for all the prophets  and apostles, and for all the martyrs and confessors, and for all that mourn, that are  in straits, and are sick, and for all that are under difficulties and trials, and for all the  weak and the oppressed, and for all the dead that have gone from amongst us; then for  all that ask a prayer from our weakness, and for me, a degraded and feeble sinner.  O  Lord  our  God,  according  to  Thy  mercies  and  the  multitude  of  Thy  favours,  look  upon  Thy  people,  and  on  me,  a  feeble  man,  not  according  to  my  sins  and  my  follies,  but  that  they  may  become  worthy  of  the  forgiveness  of  their  sins  through  this  holy  body,  which  they  receive  with  faith,  through  the  grace  of  Thy mercy, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.”     The  following  prayer  also  indicates  that  the  officiators  consider  themselves unworthy but look for the reception of the Holy Mysteries to give  them remission of sins: “We, Thy degraded, weak, and feeble servants who are  congregated in Thy name, and now stand before Thee, and have received with joy the  form  which  is  from  Thee,  praising,  glorifying,  and  exalting,  commemorate  and  celebrate this great, awful, holy, and divine mystery of the passion, death, burial, and  resurrection of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ. And may Thy Holy Spirit come, O  Lord,  and  rest  upon  this  oblation  of  Thy  servants  which  they  offer,  and  bless  and  sanctify it; and may it be unto us, O Lord, for the propitiation of our offences and  the forgiveness of our sins, and for a grand hope of resurrection from the dead, and  for a new life in the Kingdom of the heavens, with all who have been pleasing before  Him.  And  on  account  of  the  whole  of  Thy  wonderful  dispensation  towards  us,  we  shall  render  thanks  unto  Thee,  and  glorify  Thee  without  ceasing  in  Thy  Church,  redeemed  by  the  precious  blood  of  Thy  Christ,  with  open  mouths  and  joyful  countenances:  Ascribing  praise,  honour,  thanksgiving,  and  adoration  to  Thy  holy,  loving, and life‐creating name, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.”     Finally, the following petition indicates quite clearly the belief that the  officiators  and  entire  congregation  are  unworthy  of  receiving  the  Mysteries:  “The  clemency  of  Thy  grace,  O  our  Lord  and  God,  gives  us  access  to  these  renowned, holy, life‐creating, and Divine Mysteries, unworthy though we be.”    St. Luke the Evangelist (+18 October, 86), Bishop of Thebes in Greece,  in  his  Divine  Liturgy,  writes:  “Bless,  O  Lord,  Thy  faithful  people  who  are  bowed  down  before  Thee;  deliver  us  from  injuries  and  temptations;  make  us  worthy  to  receive  these  Holy  Mysteries  in  purity  and  virtue,  and  may  we  be  absolved  and sanctified by them. We offer Thee praise and thanksgiving and to Thine Only‐ begotten  Son  and  to  Thy  Holy  Spirit,  now  and  ever,  and  unto  the  ages  of  ages.  Amen.”     St. Dionysius the Areopagite (+3 October, 96), Bishop of Athens, in his  Divine Liturgy, writes: “Giver of Holiness, and distributor of every good, O Lord,  Who  sanctifiest  every  rational  creature with  sanctification,  which  is from Thee;  sanctify,  through  Thy  Holy  Spirit,  us  Thy  servants,  who  bow  before  Thee;  free  us  from all servile passions of sin, from envy, treachery, deceit, hatred, enmities,  and  from  him,  who  works  the  same,  that  we  may  be  worthy,  holily  to  complete  the  ministry  of  these  life‐giving  Mysteries,  through  the  heavenly  Master, Jesus Christ, Thine Only‐begotten Son, through Whom, and with Whom, is  due to Thee, glory and honour, together with Thine All‐holy, Good and Life‐creating  Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.” Thus, it is God that offers  sanctification  to  mankind,  purifies  mankind  from  sins,  and  makes  mankind  worthy of the Mysteries. This worthiness is not achieved by fasting.    In  the  same  Anaphora  we  read:  “Essentially  existing,  and  from  all  ages;  Whose  nature  is  incomprehensible,  Who  art  near  and  present  to  all,  without  any  change of Thy sublimity; Whose goodness every existing thing longs for and desires;  the intelligible indeed, and creature endowed with intelligence, through intelligence;  those  endowed  with  sense,  through  their  senses;  Who,  although  Thou  art  One  essentially, nevertheless art present with us, and amongst us, in this hour, in which  Thou  hast  called  and  led  us  to  these  Thy  holy  Mysteries;  and  hast  made  us  worthy to stand before the sublime throne of Thy majesty, and to handle the sacred  vessels  of  Thy  ministry  with  our  impure  hands:  take  away  from  us,  O  Lord,  the  cloak of iniquity in which we are enfolded, as from Jesus, the son of Josedec the  High  Priest,  thou  didst  take  away  the  filthy  garments,  and  adorn  us  with  piety  and  justice,  as  Thou  didst  adorn  him  with  a  vestment  of  glory;  that  clothed  with  Thee  alone,  as  it  were  with  a  garment,  and  being  like  temples  crowned  with  glory, we may see Thee unveiled with a mind divinely illuminated, and may feast,  whilst  we,  by  communicating  therein,  enjoy  this  sacrifice  set  before  us;  and  that we may render to Thee glory and praise, together with Thine Only‐begotten Son,  and Thine All‐holy, Good and Life‐creating Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of  ages. Amen.” Once again, worthiness derives from God and not from fasting.    In the same Liturgy we read: “I invoke Thee, O God the Father, have mercy  upon us, and wash away, through Thy grace, the uncleanness of my evil deeds;  destroy, through Thy  mercy, what I have done, worthy of wrath; for I do not 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/contracerycii06/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

OrthodoxAnglicanUnity1914to1921 30%

Seraphim Phocas and Demetrius Marinakis, were present.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/orthodoxanglicanunity1914to1921/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com