Search


PDF Archive search engine
Last database update: 04 August at 16:10 - Around 76000 files indexed.


Show results per page

Results for «soviet»:


Total: 100 results - 0.063 seconds

NuclearProliferationandSecurityConcerns 100%

      NUCLEAR PROLIFERATION AND SECURITY CONCERNS:   Accurately predicting future state proliferation by looking at various  factors outside the security model.                   Amanda Sewell  Sam Houston State University  September 2016              1  Why do states build nuclear weapons? This is the question that Scott  Sagan attempts to answer by in his research by looking at three different  theory models. In the past, the security concerns of the state were a positive  prediction to whether or not they would develop nuclear weapons, but the  same factors that pressured the states in the past, are no longer present  today. Without these factors, would security still be a reliable indicator?  Sagan argues that focusing only on the security considerations as the cause  of proliferation is “dangerously inadequate”.1  While the security model  accurately explains past cases of nuclear proliferation by states, it would not  be reliable in current times since the factors are no longer the same.  Therefore, if we want to predict which countries might develop nuclear  weapons in the future, underlying security concerns can not be the only area  we pay attention to. Recent proliferation cases have demonstrated that we  must take the other factors that play an important role in states decisions  regarding proliferation. These factors, along with security concerns, may  provide a much more accurate predictor of future proliferation.  First, let’s take a closer look at why the security model has  worked for past cases. Sagan describes the security model as “any state that  seeks to maintain its national security must balance against any rival state  that develops nuclear weapons by gaining access to a nuclear deterrent  itself.” 2 The overwhelming majority of nuclear programs were developed  1 2  Sagan, Scott D. 2012. Why do states build nuclear weapons? Three models in search of a bomb. Pp.54   Ibid. pp 56      2  around WWII and the Cold War. The security model is better at predicting  these  behaviors of superpowers such as Russia and the United States where  there is an imminent threat to state’s security. The nuclear arms race  between the United States and the former Soviet Union provides a case  example of this security model and how it explains behavior towards nuclear  proliferation.  On July 16, 1945, the first atomic bomb was tested in the New  Mexico Desert.3  Less than a month later, an atomic bomb was dropped on  Hiroshima, Japan. The United States gained military superiority and a need  arose for other states to have acquire similar weaponry for security. “Stallin  wanted to be able to threaten the United States with atomic weapons, just  as the United States was able to threaten the Soviet Union”4   The Soviets  tested their first atomic bomb in 1949 after blueprints were leaked to them  by German physicist, ​Klaus Fuchs, who worked on the first United States  bomb.5   Now that the Soviet Union had comparable weapons, the United  States began tests on new types and designs of bombs in order to regain  their superiority. Each side continued to add to their arsenals as the tensions  rose. There was a verifiable need for the Soviets to gain a nuclear deterrent  to prevent an attack by the United States, thus the security model  accurately explains proliferation decisions by the state.    Davis, Watson. "Background of Atomic Bomb." ​The Science News­Letter 49.25 (1946): 394­395.   Zuberi, Matin. "Stalin and the bomb." ​Strategic Analysis 23.7 (1999): 1133­1153.  5  "Soviets explode atomic bomb ­ Aug 29, 1949 ­ HISTORY.com." 2010. 20 Sep. 2016  <​http://www.history.com/this­day­in­history/soviets­explode­atomic­bomb​>

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/09/21/nuclearproliferationandsecurityconcerns/

21/09/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

NuclearProliferationandSecurityConcerns-AmandaSewell (3) 99%

      NUCLEAR PROLIFERATION AND SECURITY CONCERNS:   Accurately predicting future state proliferation by looking at various  factors outside the security model.                   Amanda Sewell  Sam Houston State University  Political Science 5367­International Relations  September 2016              1  Why do states build nuclear weapons? This is the question that Scott  Sagan attempts to answer by in his research by looking at three different  theory models. In the past, the security concerns of the state were a positive  prediction to whether or not they would develop nuclear weapons, but the  same factors that pressured the states in the past, are no longer present  today. Without these factors, would security still be a reliable indicator?  Sagan argues that focusing only on the security considerations as the cause  of proliferation is “dangerously inadequate”.1  While the security model  accurately explains past cases of nuclear proliferation by states, it would not  be reliable in current times since the factors are no longer the same.  Therefore, if we want to predict which countries might develop nuclear  weapons in the future, underlying security concerns can not be the only area  we pay attention to. Recent proliferation cases have demonstrated that we  must take the other factors that play an important role in states decisions  regarding proliferation. These factors, along with security concerns, may  provide a much more accurate predictor of future proliferation.  First, let’s take a closer look at why the security model has  worked for past cases. Sagan describes the security model as “any state that  seeks to maintain its national security must balance against any rival state  that develops nuclear weapons by gaining access to a nuclear deterrent  itself.” 2 The overwhelming majority of nuclear programs were developed  1 2  Sagan, Scott D. 2012. Why do states build nuclear weapons? Three models in search of a bomb. Pp.54   Ibid. pp 56      2  around WWII and the Cold War. The security model is better at predicting  these  behaviors of superpowers such as Russia and the United States where  there is an imminent threat to state’s security. The nuclear arms race  between the United States and the former Soviet Union provides a case  example of this security model and how it explains behavior towards nuclear  proliferation.  On July 16, 1945, the first atomic bomb was tested in the New  Mexico Desert.3  Less than a month later, an atomic bomb was dropped on  Hiroshima, Japan. The United States gained military superiority and a need  arose for other states to have acquire similar weaponry for security. “Stallin  wanted to be able to threaten the United States with atomic weapons, just  as the United States was able to threaten the Soviet Union”4   The Soviets  tested their first atomic bomb in 1949 after blueprints were leaked to them  by German physicist, ​Klaus Fuchs, who worked on the first United States  bomb.5   Now that the Soviet Union had comparable weapons, the United  States began tests on new types and designs of bombs in order to regain  their superiority. Each side continued to add to their arsenals as the tensions  rose. There was a verifiable need for the Soviets to gain a nuclear deterrent  to prevent an attack by the United States, thus the security model  accurately explains proliferation decisions by the state.    Davis, Watson. "Background of Atomic Bomb." ​The Science News­Letter 49.25 (1946): 394­395.   Zuberi, Matin. "Stalin and the bomb." ​Strategic Analysis 23.7 (1999): 1133­1153.  5  "Soviets explode atomic bomb ­ Aug 29, 1949 ­ HISTORY.com." 2010. 20 Sep. 2016  <​http://www.history.com/this­day­in­history/soviets­explode­atomic­bomb​>

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/09/21/nuclearproliferationandsecurityconcerns-amandasewell-3/

21/09/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

Edward Hallett Carr - The Bolshevik Revolution, Volume 3 98%

A HISTORY OF SOVIET RUSSIA THE BOLSHEVIK REVOLUTION 1917-1923 BY EDWARD HALLETT CARR * VOLUME TIIHEE LONDON MACMILLAN &

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/07/11/edward-hallett-carr-the-bolshevik-revolution-volume-3/

11/07/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

MARK VOYGER RUSSIAN LAWFARE 97%

RUS AND SOVIET LAWFARE (1654-1991) RUS and Soviet Experience with Nation-State System (18th–20th c.) • Partition of sovereign states (POL – 3 times in 18th c.) • Suppression of nationalist movements (POL, HUN) • Division of spheres of influence (along with other Great Powers) • Use of ethno-religious rifts to destabilize neighbors (Ottomans) • Limited sovereignty of Soviet satellites (HUN, CZE, POL) RUS Empire Lawfare:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/11/28/mark-voygerrussian-lawfare/

28/11/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

Edward Hallett Carr - The Bolshevik Revolution, Volume 1 94%

A HISTORY OF SOVIET RUSSIA THE BOLSHEVIK REVOLUTION 1917-1923 BY EDWARD HALLETT CARR VOLUME ONE LONDON MACMILLAN &!

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/07/11/edward-hallett-carr-the-bolshevik-revolution-volume-1/

11/07/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

craven1969 93%

Soviet Phys.—JETP 16, 818 (1963)].

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/12/12/craven1969/

12/12/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

0000 CND CV Short Aug 2017 93%

CHRIS DONNELLY CMG TD As a graduate of Manchester University and reserve officer in the British Army Intelligence Corps, Chris Donnelly helped to establish, and later headed, the British Army’s Soviet Studies Research Centre at RMA Sandhurst.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/12/13/0000-cnd-cv-short-aug-2017/

13/12/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

Kolyma Tales - Shalanov, Varlan 92%

A prose writer and poet, he has become known chiefly for his Kolyma Tales , in which he describes life in the Soviet forced-labour camps in north eastern Siberia.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/03/07/kolyma-tales-shalanov-varlan/

07/03/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

Tableau des Blindages 91%

550 (more vs Soviet 1980s APFSDS) Glacis:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2013/08/10/tableau-des-blindages/

10/08/2013 www.pdf-archive.com

investigating-congressional-organizational 90%

The only other country involved in technocratic enterprises during this period was the Soviet Union.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/09/21/investigating-congressional-organizational/

21/09/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

Victory Insider #1 - Gulf Strike 90%

In scenario 1, the Iranian forces have defeated the Iraqisand have had their ground forces revitalized with equipment from the Soviet Union.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2013/10/27/victory-insider-1-gulf-strike/

26/10/2013 www.pdf-archive.com

Class Notes by MIDTERM 10.16.2014 89%

Containment • Patient, long but firm containment of Soviet influence • Containment as a grand strategy--the US would provide firm and consistent pressure against soviet efforts toe expand and achieve its goals abroad • This can involve the use of military force • Truman Doctrine:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/10/14/class-notes-by-midterm-10-16-2014/

14/10/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

Edward Hallett Carr - The Bolshevik Revolution, Volume 2 89%

may who First Pirst Printing Printing Printed in in the Printed of America the United United States States of America PREFACE work, OF the criticisms criticisms made by reviewers the first volume of of this this work, made by reviewers of of the OF the first volume the most cogent was the the charge that I had inverted inverted the the natural natural order order the most I had cogent was charge that political and the first by describing the political of the first and constitutional constitutional arrangements describing the by arrangements of years the Soviet the economic Soviet regime of the in advan� advance of of the economic of my treatment of regime in years of my treatment conditions which in in large large part part dictated dictated and them.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/07/11/edward-hallett-carr-the-bolshevik-revolution-volume-2/

11/07/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

1941 suvi eestis (2007) 88%

The falling apart of Soviet authority in Estonia and the evacuation of Soviet institutions to Russia in 1941 ......................................................................................

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/06/17/1941-suvi-eestis-2007/

17/06/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

Portugal reaction to the launch of sputnik 88%

The whole world witnessed through the media the soviet achievement.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2011/09/08/portugal-reaction-to-the-launch-of-sputnik/

08/09/2011 www.pdf-archive.com

Dissertation 87%

17 18 19 20 5 Effectiveness of secrecy and censorship 5.1 Soviet spies and atomic espionage .

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/11/09/dissertation/

09/11/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

johnsaf 86%

In 1954, by decree of Soviet premier Nikita Khrushchev, Crimea was officially transferred from the control of the Russian Soviet Socialist Republic to that of the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic.1 The move transferred over a million ethnic Russians and nearly 250-300,000 Ukrainians to Ukraine.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/05/25/johnsaf/

25/05/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

another-view-of-stalin1 86%

201 STALIN AND THE ANTI-FASCIST WAR.........................................................................................................................203 THE GERMANO-SOVIET PACT...................................................................................................................................................

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/02/25/another-view-of-stalin1/

25/02/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

The Institute for Statecraft Expert Team v 3 85%

worked in the Soviet Studies Research Centre at the Royal Military Academy, Sandhurst;

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/12/13/the-institute-for-statecraft-expert-team-v-3/

13/12/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

aNewAge 83%

Because the priority of the United States at the time was the prevention of a very real nuclear threat from the Soviet Union against the US mainland.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/04/29/anewage/

29/04/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

debeers3 83%

Eventually, the Soviet Union rejoined the cartel, this time in an official way and at what industry participants believed to be substantially improved conditions.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2013/01/08/debeers3/

08/01/2013 www.pdf-archive.com

Antifascist Resolution 8-9th May 2015 81%

The overthrow of fascism was achieved after a long process of struggle by the antifascist forces, especially the Soviet Union, national liberation movements, the major role played by the communist parties and the decisive contribution of the youth.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/03/11/antifascist-resolution-8-9th-may-2015/

11/03/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

Developments in Outer Space 81%

The Cold War’s superpower rivalry between the United States and the Soviet Union set new precedents for space exploration and shaped today’s international norms.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/12/12/developments-in-outer-space/

12/12/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

CNA-23 Mearsheimer 2006 79%

The Nixon administration protected it from the threat of Soviet intervention and resupplied it during the October War.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/03/28/cna-23-mearsheimer-2006/

28/03/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

e-h-carr-the-interregnum-19231924 79%

Pereg:ríùe rsts-ts3s (te3e), condit*^ !{.::?:' (1946)' Impact o'n the western lhorld "rïri,,, Soviet iilq;), The is Hßtorv?

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/07/11/e-h-carr-the-interregnum-19231924/

11/07/2016 www.pdf-archive.com