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07d0c77d5987f908461f9f7c33741941 100%

D’Amico, MD, PhD 8:00 am ADT:for M1 disease Intermittent or Continuous Speaker:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/07/15/07d0c77d5987f908461f9f7c33741941/

15/07/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

BeachesRotaractPlan2015-16 SAMPLE 99%

tee shirts, speaker gifts, printing, training, like PETS) To be determined at 1st board meeting of the Rotary Year after membership dues are collected.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/09/01/beachesrotaractplan2015-16-sample/

01/09/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

SeanTrott HonorsThesis 99%

We investigated whether the within-language variation could be explained by an individual speaker’s expertise in manner.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/02/13/seantrott-honorsthesis/

12/02/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

B&W AM-1 Brochure 98%

This ultra-durable, weather resistant speaker is designed with the outdoors in mind – perfect for patios, gardens and poolsides – but its robust design and sleek looks also make it a great choice for public indoor spaces.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/12/07/b-w-am-1-brochure/

07/12/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

Invisible Audio Solution 98%

http://www.dsppatech.com/ Invisible Speaker Invisible Speaker is totally invisible;

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/03/22/invisible-audio-solution/

22/03/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

B&W CI700 Series Brochure 98%

For this range, we’ve come up with a number of improvements to the ways speakers are fitted into the home environment – including rigid back boxes that create more volume around the speaker while giving more stability and control.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/12/07/b-w-ci700-series-brochure/

07/12/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

Grover Huffman Preference Test Key 97%

CLA 1 Signature speakers with custom cabinetry design by Gort darkmatter, IC's are White shielded hybrid Grover's and speaker cable is GH Ex+.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/01/20/grover-huffman-preference-test-key/

20/01/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

B&W CI600 Series Brochure 97%

The only visible evidence of each speaker is its slimline grille and frame, which can be painted to blend perfectly with your interior style, or even covered with co-ordinating fabric.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/12/07/b-w-ci600-series-brochure/

07/12/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

FINAL PROGRAM 96%

of over over 300 300 experts experts inrisk their inbolism their Speaker:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/12/29/final-program/

29/12/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

Campus PA Solution 96%

Multi zone amplifier There are equipped with 70V/100V speaker output and 4-16 ohms speaker output, rated power 30w~450w, with USB/SD/FM/MIC/AUX/Bluetooth and so on.AUX output for extend amplifier.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/03/22/campus-pa-solution/

22/03/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

B&W CT800 Brochure 95%

Naturally, it uses the world’s ultimate reference speaker system, featuring B&W 800 Series speakers.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/12/31/b-w-ct800-brochure/

31/12/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

PRG Guidelines 95%

Prior to Your Presentation Each speaker can bring their presentation to the Speaker Ready Room with a:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/09/13/prg-guidelines/

13/09/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

thesublimecity 95%

  Towards an Urban Sublime: Expressing the Inexpressible in Urban Romantic Poetry  As the industrial revolution brought about the rapid urbanization of cities throughout  Europe, writers who were previously concerned with the aesthetics of nature and the countryside  found themselves grappling with an entirely new set of poetic and philosophical concerns. The  teeming crowds, towering structures and spectacular sights that they encountered in the novel  environment of the city incited in them feelings of overwhelming terror and awe akin to those  typically associated with the romantic “sublime.” However, as we look more closely at the  city­focused works of poets like Baillie, Wordsworth and Hood, we begin to see that there is a  fundamental difference between the “natural” sublime of earlier romantic poetry and the “urban”  sublime of the city poem. Whereas the poet’s sublime experience in nature is typically associated  with some sort of catharsis or transcendence, forcing man to come to terms with the limitations  of his own humanity, the urban sublime instead incites a feelings of wonder and disgust at the  incredible potential of that humanity itself, or—as Anne Janowitz put it in her essay ​ The  Artifactual Sublime​ —it forces man to confront “the self as if it were not the self; to experience  the madeness of the human world as if it were different stuff than the labour of persons.”   While it is true that, as Janowitz notes, this “mis­recognition” of the sublime object often  resulted in the experience of “romantic alienation,” I argue that the use of sublime language and  natural imagery also acted as a sort of coping mechanism for their writers. Through the  experience of the “urban” sublime is of course intrinsically linked to feelings of terror and  isolation, the fact that these poets were describing particularly urban experiences in terms of  something formerly associated with nature helped them to bridge the gap between the urban  world and the natural one. This technique, therefore, served the dual purpose of expressing the        unfamiliarity of this new landscape and familiarizing it, allowing these poets to discover, as  Wordsworth put it, that the underlying “spirit of Nature” was still upon them, even in this “vast  receptacle.”   In Thomas Hood’s delightfully erratic ​ Moral Reflections on the Cross of Saint Paul’s​ , we  find a perfect example of the struggle many poets faced to familiarize the sublimely  overwhelming urban environment. Hood’s speaker—who is presumably a tourist visiting  London for the first time—is hilariously unable to produce any original or insightful  “reflections” about the complex cityscape he sees spread out before him, and resorts instead to  stringing together a bizarre collection of references and metaphors that don’t seem to fit together  into a cohesive vision.   The speaker’s numerous allusions to “classic” works of literature suggest that he feels a  longing to express the “profound” nature of the landscape he is viewing, but even these  references come off as disjointed and confused. In the poem’s first stanza, the speaker compares  the ball of Saint Paul’s cathedral to Mount Olympus, the home of the gods in Greek mythology.  He then immediately moves on to reference a figure from Roman mythology, when he proclaims  that he is sitting “Among the gods, by Jupiter!” The speaker’s thoughts turn again towards the  literary in the third stanza, when—looking down at the city crowds beneath him—the speaker  feels the need to question the nature of man. “What is life?” He asks himself, and answers with  an apparent reference to a now cliche line from William Shakespeare's ​ As You Like it​ : “And what  is life? And all its ages— / There’s seven stages!” Before he is able to offer any sort of “real”  philosophical inquiry into what he means by this, however, the speaker distracts himself by  naming off the seven neighborhoods of London, and never returns to the subject.         While this random misfiring of half­baked references helps develop the speaker’s  delightfully zany personality, it also gestures at the bewilderment he feels upon taking in the  sprawling landscape of London from above. Though the speaker cannot adequately express the  profound emotional impact of this landscape in his own words—and it is clear that he does not  have the educational background to substantiate even an insightful literary comparison—he still  feels the urge to grasp for images and analogies that he associates with grandiosity and power.  This attempt—and failure—to express the inexpressible is a common struggle in the literature of  the sublime, and in Joanna Baillie’s poem ​ London​ —which was written around the same time as  Hood’s piece—we are introduced to yet another speaker who cannot quite find the right words to  describe the overwhelming urban landscape. The difference here is that Baillie’s speaker is more  familiar with the concept of the natural sublime, and she uses the language associated with it to  explore the ways that the experience of urban sublime is both related to and separate from the  experience of the sublime in nature.  The poem’s initial description of the city—in which we find the city viewed again from  above, from the hills of Hampstead “through the clear air”—presents the urban space as a rather  innocuous, almost quaint vision. The London skyline seems to the speaker a “goodly sight,” and  its structures are rendered in relation to familiar human figures. The spires of St. Paul’s cathedral  flank the structure “in kindred grace, like twain of sisters dear,” the “ridgy roofs” of the city’s  buildings sit amicably “side by side.” The entire vision is “softly tinted” by the distance of the  viewer, _____. However, as the air begins to grow denser, and “moistened winds” prevail, the  city’s landscape transfigures into something far more menacing. The “thin soft haze” of the  poem’s first section becomes a “grand panoply of smoke arrayed,” and the dome of St. Paul’s        Cathedral—which is now surrounded not by quaint spires, but by “heavy” clouds that sail around  its imposing dome—seems “a curtain gloom / Connecting heaven and earth,—a threatening sign  of doom.” The shifting weather strips the humanity from the city’s landscape, and the language  of the speaker quickly shifts to the language that references the natural sublime. The combination  of almost ethereal    However, this use of sublime language also allows the speaker to articulate the  differences between the urban world and the natural one. Though the speaker seems compelled  to compare the structure to prodigious natural figures (she states that the cathedral “might some  lofty alpine peak be deemed”) it becomes apparent that these metaphors are not quite sufficient  to describe the sight she is witnessing. Because its form reveals “man’s artful structure,” (and by  extension the “artful structure” of man’s society), the cathedral cannot be viewed as totally  natural. Instead, it is referred to as “more than natural,” and seems to transcend the boundaries of  both humanity and nature as it first “connects heaven and hearth” and then, a few lines later  seems “far removed from Earth.”   This somewhat confused description demonstrates the speaker’s complex feelings about  the urban landscape. Though she knows one thing for certain about this cathedral—“She is  sublime”—the speaker cannot quite find the language she needs to describe the sense of the  particularly “urban” sublime she is experiencing. She knows the cathedral is a product of  mankind, and that the power that it is imbued with is intrinsically linked with the oppressive  church that it represents and the often corrupt society that it is a part of. Part of the reason that  the church looks seems to her so terrifying is certainly the fact that entering the streets of the city  means succumbing to the dominance of the church, the government, and society as a whole.         Language has always failed to fully express the sublime experience, however, and the  speaker’s attempts to conflate the urban sublime of the city with the natural sublime simply  demonstrates a desire to give a recognizable form to the terror she is experiencing—in order to  truly become what Lyotard calls an “expressive witness to the inexpressible,” the speaker must  carry thought and rationality to their logical conclusions, and for a romantic poet the world can  best be rationalized and understood in terms of the rural. In contrast to Hood’s speaker, whose  manic metaphor­hopping was a symptom of a mind unprepared to grapple with the urban  landscape’s complexities, Baillie’s speaker logically considers the unfamiliar in terms of her own  experience, and makes the urban feel, in a way, like an extension of nature.   This blending of the natural and the urban is epitomized in the final portion of Baillie’s  poem, when the viewpoint shifts to the perspective of a “distant traveller.” From afar, this  traveller is able to view the London in its entirety, and finds himself awestruck by the stars in the  “luminous canopy” above the city that seem to be “cast up from myriads of lamps that shine /  Along her streets in many a starry line.” The “flood of human life in motion” creates a noise that  sounds to the traveller like the “voice of a tempestuous ocean,” and he finds his soul filled with a  “sad but pleasing awe” upon hearing it. These magnificent sights, which seem at once human  and natural, express the rich suggest that the city is capable of igniting in the human soul the  same complex emotions that a sublime natural splendor might.  Wordsworth took this idea to its ultimate conclusion as he navigated the ​ bacchanalian  chaos that is St. Bartholomew’s fair at the conclusion of ​ The Prelude, Book Seven. ​ In  Wordsworth’s poem, we are not viewing London from above, but from the very trenches of the  city, and the sublimity he is experiencing comes not from the contemplation of the urban   

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/04/20/thesublimecity/

20/04/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

IP Speakers Solution 95%

http://www.dsppatech.com/ IP Speaker is a kind of PA speaker of IP Audio System.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/03/22/ip-speakers-solution/

22/03/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

B&W T7 Black and Gold Sell Sheet 94%

T7 T7 Wireless Portable Speaker Bowers &

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/12/31/b-w-t7-black-and-gold-sell-sheet/

31/12/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

story 94%

Behind him, the Speaker stifled a yawn.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/06/14/story/

14/06/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

Venue PA Solution 94%

Built-in monitor speaker. ... DSP6062B—20W-40W PA Wall Mount Speaker;

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/03/22/venue-pa-solution/

22/03/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

Upcoming Events 2018 94%

Leaders Series Venue and speaker TBA, 8.00am to 9.30am st 21 :

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/04/18/upcoming-events-2018/

18/04/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

2018 UrbNext Conf Workshops 94%

Adam Beck, PIA, Executive Director, Smart Cities Council Australia New Zealand Speaker:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/01/05/2018-urbnext-conf-workshops/

05/01/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

JF 4x4-DIN-A5 2015 ol 94%

Speaker sind Sie für alles gewappnet.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/04/09/jf-4x4-din-a5-2015-ol/

09/04/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

Rules of Procedure - Leeds MUN Conference 2015 94%

A point of personal privilege may interrupt the speaker only on grounds of audibility or other circumstances preventing participation in debate.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/02/15/rules-of-procedure-leeds-mun-conference-2015/

14/02/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

B&W 600 Series Brochure 93%

683  The largest speaker in the new 600 Series delivers outstanding power, accuracy and musicality.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/12/31/b-w-600-series-brochure/

31/12/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

Supermarket PA Solution 93%

DSP901—PA Ceiling Speaker; DSP6061B—PA Wall Mount Speaker;

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/03/22/supermarket-pa-solution/

22/03/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

Asius AES Paper 92%

Ambrose Sound Reproduction within a Closed Ear Canal monitors, the fact that he was both and engineer and a vocal performer gave him a unique grasp of the full range of drawbacks associated with sealing a speaker in the ear.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/03/31/asius-aes-paper/

31/03/2016 www.pdf-archive.com