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Steve Obsitnik for Connecticut Donation Form 99%

I certify that I am either a United States citizen or a foreign national with permanent resident status in the United States.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/01/17/steve-obsitnik-for-connecticut-donation-form/

17/01/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

raven halfmoon cv 98%

Painting, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas, 2014 Post-Baccalaureate in Ceramics, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma, United States, 2016 Solo Exhibitions:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/04/14/raven-halfmoon-cv/

13/04/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

95818 98%

Senators Pearson of the 51st, Rogers of the 21st, Williams of the 19th, Wiles of the 37th, Mullis of the 53rd and others ADOPTED SENATE A RESOLUTION 1 Affirming states' rights based on Jeffersonian principles;

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/04/10/95818/

10/04/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

Federal Prosecution 98%

1 United States v. ... 2 United States v.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2012/02/24/federal-prosecution/

24/02/2012 www.pdf-archive.com

BRIEF FINAL 98%

United States, 135 S.C!.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/10/05/brief-final/

05/10/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

04291042 98%

As states in FSP are implicit, LTSA takes an approach that maps an action trace into a sequence of abstract states described by fluents.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2011/09/08/04291042/

08/09/2011 www.pdf-archive.com

EVERIFY 98%

State Laws In recent years, many states have been joining the ranks of immigration enforcement.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2012/02/09/everify/

09/02/2012 www.pdf-archive.com

darren goins cv 98%

Darren Goins Born 1984 Lives and works in Los Angeles, CA, United States Education:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/04/13/darren-goins-cv/

13/04/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

05734242 98%

GUI states are usually defined as the overall combination of properties of all the components or widgets of the GUI.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2011/09/08/05734242/

08/09/2011 www.pdf-archive.com

17-35105 (1) 98%

FOR PUBLICATION UNITED STATES COURT OF APPEALS FOR THE NINTH CIRCUIT STATE OF WASHINGTON;

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/02/10/17-35105-1/

10/02/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

JATIT 6Vol21No2 98%

GUI States, User Interface Testing, Modeling, XML, And State Charts.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2011/08/13/jatit-6vol21no2/

12/08/2011 www.pdf-archive.com

Lawful-Defense-against-Psychiatry 98%

2,784 SIGNATURES NAME ZIP CODE COUNTRY DATE SIGNED 1 Daniel Carter 4157 Australia May 16, 2015 2 Zehra Tufenk 3087 Netherlands May 16, 2015 3 Mitchell Rappaport 78755 United States May 16, 2015 4 Sirpa Björkbacka 90500 Finland May 16, 2015 5 Wai Ling Liu 31084 Georgia May 16, 2015 6 Gary Smith South Africa May 16, 2015 7 Robert Gabin 83000 France May 16, 2015 8 Serge Leroi 83830 France May 16, 2015 9 Alan Martin Dublin 5 Ireland May 16, 2015 NAME ZIP CODE COUNTRY DATE SIGNED 10 Andrew Muir G82 3NR United Kingdom May 16, 2015 11 Jan Hakim 51200 Malaysia May 16, 2015 12 Henrik Bentzen Pos2850tal code Denmark May 16, 2015 13 Fadzilah Din 68100 Malaysia May 16, 2015 14 Maria Kljuce 3081 Australia May 16, 2015 15 Иван Городецкий 630107 Russia May 16, 2015 16 Byron Bravery 24019 United States May 16, 2015 17 Earl Livings 3129 Australia May 16, 2015 18 Susan Walpole Dt29ul United Kingdom May 16, 2015 19 Bill Mann K2W 0B4 Canada May 16, 2015 20 Wendy Greene 92583 United States May 16, 2015 21 Jacques Laus 7090 Belgium May 16, 2015 22 Michael Harper Rh19 1sy United Kingdom May 16, 2015 23 Peter Angel 2282 Australia May 16, 2015 24 Dmitry Serov 299023 Ukraine May 16, 2015 25 Wilma Lagrand 4451RN Netherlands May 16, 2015 26 Jan Duck Davies im47bf United Kingdom May 16, 2015 27 Hilda Nibiru Shaw 0591 New Zealand May 16, 2015 28 Aquene Oceans 43039 Italy May 16, 2015 29 Mike Stryk BN176EU United Kingdom May 16, 2015 30 David Lamb 41042 United States May 16, 2015 31 Anita Anderson 3820 Australia May 16, 2015 32 James Cates 60169 United States May 16, 2015 33 Nicholas DeVincenzo 07647 United States May 16, 2015 34 Paul Harris 5116 Australia May 16, 2015 35 Rita Hankinson L1ZOC3 Canada May 16, 2015 36 Amanda Lawyer M22 4EP United Kingdom May 16, 2015 37 Daniela Ruegg 4570 Australia May 16, 2015 38 Dave Rendle sa433as United Kingdom May 16, 2015 39 Geoffrey White 2049 Australia May 16, 2015 40 Tom Grimshaw 2037 Australia May 16, 2015 41 Pete Vilinsky 10036 United States May 16, 2015 42 Nigel Coles TA21 9EJ United Kingdom May 16, 2015 43 Tim Holmes 12992 United States May 16, 2015 44 Chris Sharp BN3 2LN United Kingdom May 16, 2015 45 Lena Bowling BN22 0QY United Kingdom May 16, 2015 46 Celine O'carroll 1 Ireland May 16, 2015 NAME ZIP CODE COUNTRY DATE SIGNED 47 Amy McCarthy 13208 United States May 16, 2015 48 Lorraine Weiler N4N 2T4 Canada May 16, 2015 49 Daphne Olson 12563 United States May 16, 2015 50 Maia Knaggs 3153 Australia May 16, 2015 51 David Taylor EH25 9NB United Kingdom May 16, 2015 52 Eva Plzáková 332 02 Czech Republic May 16, 2015 53 Laura Ann K Bernstein 10530 United States May 16, 2015 54 Donna Lordi 07050 United States May 16, 2015 55 Christa Turnell 81301 United States May 16, 2015 56 Natalia Trilis 48230 Finland May 16, 2015 57 Rafael Medalla 11801 United States May 16, 2015 58 Carrie Wright 2602 Australia May 16, 2015 59 Sandra Murphy M26 United Kingdom May 16, 2015 60 Vanessa Sullivan 4022 Australia May 16, 2015 61 Tom Friel G662le United Kingdom May 16, 2015 62 Susana Mijangos 80-354 Poland May 16, 2015 63 Betsy Pearson 61369 United States May 16, 2015 64 Robin ABBATIELLO 34667 United States May 16, 2015 65 Pedro Gabriel 1500-336 Portugal May 16, 2015 66 Safia Deriche W6 0TA United Kingdom May 16, 2015 67 Mette Leonhardt 8930 Denmark May 16, 2015 68 Gianfabio Sette 00149 Italy May 16, 2015 69 Ravin Mentalist Eh47 7hy United Kingdom May 16, 2015 70 Jean Denis Barthe 24240 France May 16, 2015 71 Christian Lirette J0W1A0 Canada May 16, 2015 72 Mary Ellen Persuit 15143 United States May 16, 2015 73 Mildred Jones 48238 United States May 16, 2015 74 Christine Pepper 28147 United States May 16, 2015 75 Via Josa 75604 United States May 16, 2015 76 Alexandr Yantselovskiy 08132 Ukraine May 16, 2015 77 Gautam Gigoo 110091 India May 16, 2015 78 Tina Hogle 29073 United States May 16, 2015 79 Ron Greif 63025 United States May 16, 2015 80 Peter Bobbermen 4670 Australia May 16, 2015 81 Sherra Franklin 94103 United States May 16, 2015 82 Kurt Wilkens 64020 United States May 16, 2015 83 Pamela Vilinsky 10036 United States May 16, 2015 NAME ZIP CODE COUNTRY DATE SIGNED 84 Stephen Drasche 10024 United States May 16, 2015 85 Roberto Montagnani 1030 Belgium May 16, 2015 86 Lars Sun 9800 Denmark May 16, 2015 87 Christine MacVicar KA280ED United Kingdom May 16, 2015 88 Auriel Benker 46205 United States May 16, 2015 89 Julie Greene 02471 United States May 16, 2015 90 Anna Angioni 09070 Italy May 16, 2015 91 Karen Douglas KY2 6AL United Kingdom May 16, 2015 92 Sandun Rashmika 031 Sri Lanka May 16, 2015 93 Jo Dunne Kirkcaldy Fife United Kingdom May 16, 2015 94 Oonagh Morham ky1 3af United Kingdom May 16, 2015 95 Kathleen Hails 285@ Australia May 16, 2015 96 Pamela Craft-Lyons 95969 United States May 16, 2015 97 Anette Feron 58642 Sweden May 16, 2015 98 Acacia Kettrey 27349 United States May 16, 2015 99 Stan Pope 64093 United States May 16, 2015 100 Tracey Haas 6233 Switzerland May 16, 2015 101 Eva Bianchi 43015 United States May 16, 2015 102 Holly Rieke 80021 United States May 16, 2015 103 Matthew Ricketts 18104 United States May 16, 2015 104 Raziehl Tayna Russia May 16, 2015 105 Dalile Rebelle 75010 France May 16, 2015 106 Petra van Son xxxxxxx Egypt May 16, 2015 107 Katherine Prezio 14219 United States May 16, 2015 108 Christopher Dubey 06111 United States May 16, 2015 109 Victoria Accardo 07849 United States May 16, 2015 110 Vicky Ellory B261RN United Kingdom May 16, 2015 111 Eldar Urmancheyev 06032 United States May 16, 2015 112 Kathleen Johnson 80205 United States May 16, 2015 113 Janet Denti 10465 United States May 16, 2015 114 Eric Lemieux H4A 2G8 Canada May 16, 2015 115 Eric Boivin H2J 3N5 Canada May 16, 2015 116 Lisa Pezzella 92054 United States May 16, 2015 117 Eternity Justice 3000 Australia May 16, 2015 118 Cathy Scarantino Mathews 11757 United States May 16, 2015 119 Miffy Cole 3219 Australia May 16, 2015 120 Jim Brash 07054 United States May 16, 2015

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/07/14/lawful-defense-against-psychiatry/

14/07/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

document 98%

134, Page 1 of 29 FOR PUBLICATION UNITED STATES COURT OF APPEALS FOR THE NINTH CIRCUIT STATE OF WASHINGTON;

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/02/10/document/

09/02/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

land use restrictions 97%

NBER WORKING PAPER SERIES TARNISHING THE GOLDEN AND EMPIRE STATES:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/11/14/land-use-restrictions/

14/11/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

CELEX 32008F0675 EN TXT 97%

L 220/32 EN Official Journal of the European Union 15.8.2008 III (Acts adopted under the EU Treaty) ACTS ADOPTED UNDER TITLE VI OF THE EU TREATY COUNCIL FRAMEWORK DECISION 2008/675/JHA of 24 July 2008 on taking account of convictions in the Member States of the European Union in the course of new criminal proceedings THE COUNCIL OF THE EUROPEAN UNION, (3) The purpose of this Framework Decision is to establish a minimum obligation for Member States to take into account convictions handed down in other Member States.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/02/03/celex-32008f0675-en-txt/

03/02/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

CMEDact 97%

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2013/04/13/cmedact/

12/04/2013 www.pdf-archive.com

337557265-Enforce-Laws 97%

THE WHITE HOUSE Office of the Press Secretary For Immediate Release January 25, 2017 EXECUTIVE ORDER - - - - - - - ENHANCING PUBLIC SAFETY IN THE INTERIOR OF THE UNITED STATES By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, including the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) (8 U.S.C.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/01/25/337557265-enforce-laws/

25/01/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

NuclearProliferationandSecurityConcerns 97%

      NUCLEAR PROLIFERATION AND SECURITY CONCERNS:   Accurately predicting future state proliferation by looking at various  factors outside the security model.                   Amanda Sewell  Sam Houston State University  September 2016              1  Why do states build nuclear weapons? This is the question that Scott  Sagan attempts to answer by in his research by looking at three different  theory models. In the past, the security concerns of the state were a positive  prediction to whether or not they would develop nuclear weapons, but the  same factors that pressured the states in the past, are no longer present  today. Without these factors, would security still be a reliable indicator?  Sagan argues that focusing only on the security considerations as the cause  of proliferation is “dangerously inadequate”.1  While the security model  accurately explains past cases of nuclear proliferation by states, it would not  be reliable in current times since the factors are no longer the same.  Therefore, if we want to predict which countries might develop nuclear  weapons in the future, underlying security concerns can not be the only area  we pay attention to. Recent proliferation cases have demonstrated that we  must take the other factors that play an important role in states decisions  regarding proliferation. These factors, along with security concerns, may  provide a much more accurate predictor of future proliferation.  First, let’s take a closer look at why the security model has  worked for past cases. Sagan describes the security model as “any state that  seeks to maintain its national security must balance against any rival state  that develops nuclear weapons by gaining access to a nuclear deterrent  itself.” 2 The overwhelming majority of nuclear programs were developed  1 2  Sagan, Scott D. 2012. Why do states build nuclear weapons? Three models in search of a bomb. Pp.54   Ibid. pp 56      2  around WWII and the Cold War. The security model is better at predicting  these  behaviors of superpowers such as Russia and the United States where  there is an imminent threat to state’s security. The nuclear arms race  between the United States and the former Soviet Union provides a case  example of this security model and how it explains behavior towards nuclear  proliferation.  On July 16, 1945, the first atomic bomb was tested in the New  Mexico Desert.3  Less than a month later, an atomic bomb was dropped on  Hiroshima, Japan. The United States gained military superiority and a need  arose for other states to have acquire similar weaponry for security. “Stallin  wanted to be able to threaten the United States with atomic weapons, just  as the United States was able to threaten the Soviet Union”4   The Soviets  tested their first atomic bomb in 1949 after blueprints were leaked to them  by German physicist, ​Klaus Fuchs, who worked on the first United States  bomb.5   Now that the Soviet Union had comparable weapons, the United  States began tests on new types and designs of bombs in order to regain  their superiority. Each side continued to add to their arsenals as the tensions  rose. There was a verifiable need for the Soviets to gain a nuclear deterrent  to prevent an attack by the United States, thus the security model  accurately explains proliferation decisions by the state.    Davis, Watson. "Background of Atomic Bomb." ​The Science News­Letter 49.25 (1946): 394­395.   Zuberi, Matin. "Stalin and the bomb." ​Strategic Analysis 23.7 (1999): 1133­1153.  5  "Soviets explode atomic bomb ­ Aug 29, 1949 ­ HISTORY.com." 2010. 20 Sep. 2016  <​http://www.history.com/this­day­in­history/soviets­explode­atomic­bomb​>

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/09/21/nuclearproliferationandsecurityconcerns/

21/09/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

NuclearProliferationandSecurityConcerns-AmandaSewell (3) 97%

      NUCLEAR PROLIFERATION AND SECURITY CONCERNS:   Accurately predicting future state proliferation by looking at various  factors outside the security model.                   Amanda Sewell  Sam Houston State University  Political Science 5367­International Relations  September 2016              1  Why do states build nuclear weapons? This is the question that Scott  Sagan attempts to answer by in his research by looking at three different  theory models. In the past, the security concerns of the state were a positive  prediction to whether or not they would develop nuclear weapons, but the  same factors that pressured the states in the past, are no longer present  today. Without these factors, would security still be a reliable indicator?  Sagan argues that focusing only on the security considerations as the cause  of proliferation is “dangerously inadequate”.1  While the security model  accurately explains past cases of nuclear proliferation by states, it would not  be reliable in current times since the factors are no longer the same.  Therefore, if we want to predict which countries might develop nuclear  weapons in the future, underlying security concerns can not be the only area  we pay attention to. Recent proliferation cases have demonstrated that we  must take the other factors that play an important role in states decisions  regarding proliferation. These factors, along with security concerns, may  provide a much more accurate predictor of future proliferation.  First, let’s take a closer look at why the security model has  worked for past cases. Sagan describes the security model as “any state that  seeks to maintain its national security must balance against any rival state  that develops nuclear weapons by gaining access to a nuclear deterrent  itself.” 2 The overwhelming majority of nuclear programs were developed  1 2  Sagan, Scott D. 2012. Why do states build nuclear weapons? Three models in search of a bomb. Pp.54   Ibid. pp 56      2  around WWII and the Cold War. The security model is better at predicting  these  behaviors of superpowers such as Russia and the United States where  there is an imminent threat to state’s security. The nuclear arms race  between the United States and the former Soviet Union provides a case  example of this security model and how it explains behavior towards nuclear  proliferation.  On July 16, 1945, the first atomic bomb was tested in the New  Mexico Desert.3  Less than a month later, an atomic bomb was dropped on  Hiroshima, Japan. The United States gained military superiority and a need  arose for other states to have acquire similar weaponry for security. “Stallin  wanted to be able to threaten the United States with atomic weapons, just  as the United States was able to threaten the Soviet Union”4   The Soviets  tested their first atomic bomb in 1949 after blueprints were leaked to them  by German physicist, ​Klaus Fuchs, who worked on the first United States  bomb.5   Now that the Soviet Union had comparable weapons, the United  States began tests on new types and designs of bombs in order to regain  their superiority. Each side continued to add to their arsenals as the tensions  rose. There was a verifiable need for the Soviets to gain a nuclear deterrent  to prevent an attack by the United States, thus the security model  accurately explains proliferation decisions by the state.    Davis, Watson. "Background of Atomic Bomb." ​The Science News­Letter 49.25 (1946): 394­395.   Zuberi, Matin. "Stalin and the bomb." ​Strategic Analysis 23.7 (1999): 1133­1153.  5  "Soviets explode atomic bomb ­ Aug 29, 1949 ­ HISTORY.com." 2010. 20 Sep. 2016  <​http://www.history.com/this­day­in­history/soviets­explode­atomic­bomb​>

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/09/21/nuclearproliferationandsecurityconcerns-amandasewell-3/

21/09/2016 www.pdf-archive.com