Search


PDF Archive search engine
Last database update: 07 March at 17:50 - Around 76000 files indexed.


Show results per page

Results for «stimuli»:


Total: 80 results - 0.251 seconds

poster time study in adults with AD 100%

a) Low-AC Group 1.4 High-AC Group 1.3 1.2 1.1 1 0.9 0.8 0.7 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Stimuli’s Durations(s) • Interaction of group × duration (non-significant, F3.35, • 40.21 = 1.95, p = .131) on the direction of errors in the time reproduction suggested that the Low-AC group tended to more underestimate durations.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/09/05/poster-time-study-in-adults-with-ad/

05/09/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

poster 99%

Reference • • • • Matrix reasoning test (Non-verbal IQ assessment) Stop-it task (Inhibition assessment) ※ The time reproduction task mainly requires participants to separately reproduce stimuli’s durations by pressing buttons after watching each stimulus.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/09/04/poster/

04/09/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

Poster2 97%

So far research has focused on the consolidation of negative stimuli.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/09/08/poster2/

07/09/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

Poster 93%

Our research aimed to find out if positive emotion is also a predictive factor when remembering emotional stimuli following sleep.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/09/08/poster/

08/09/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

Asius AAS Asius Poster (1) 88%

Test stimuli consisted of low-passed (100 Hz) music and pulsed 80 Hz, 500 Hz, and 3000 Hz pure tones.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/04/05/asius-aas-asius-poster-1/

05/04/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

kms 87%

Classical Conditioning and Operant Conditioning) -later theorists defined it as humans making sense of the world around them (Observational Learning) -learning is a result of external changes (environment) and internal processes (cognition) Classical Conditioning-​ ​learning that occurs through repeated association of 2 or more stimuli.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/11/11/kms/

11/11/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

Exploring Stimulus Variability in Applicant Attractiveness 84%

Second, the samples of stimuli used in the manipulations of applicant sex, attractiveness, and sex-typing of the job are small.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/03/07/exploring-stimulus-variability-in-applicant-attractiveness/

07/03/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

1 81%

1) Clear behavioural expectations 2) Stimuli that ‘condition’ learners to progress towards these expectations c) Cognitive Learning Theory Cognitivism rejects the idea that behaviour is just a response to external stimuli.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/06/15/1/

15/06/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

OtmaneElrhaziPatterns 79%

A pattern can be represented by a vector composed of measured stimuli or attributes derived from measured stimuli and their interrelationships.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/05/18/otmaneelrhazipatterns/

18/05/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

Poster 79%

Stimuli used in the familiar face scan.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2019/09/09/poster/

09/09/2019 www.pdf-archive.com

sfn2013 poster 76%

Thalamic Stroke Long-term Memory Task Results (Context)  The thalamus is a major relay centre of the brain and central for memory processes  Focal lesions to the thalamus has been suggested to selectively impair anterograde memory  Damage to the mammillothalamic tract has been suggested to be the most consistent predictor of anterograde amnesia  Reports in the literature are all case studies and have never examined long-term anterograde memory or the whole mammillothalamic tract Recognition ‘Is this an old/new item’ Context ‘Was the item shown on the L/R’ Aims of the Study  Assess long-term contextual memory retrieval in thalamic stroke patients  Assess the integrity of the mammillothalamic tract  Identify contributions of sub-thalamic regions and the mammillothalamic tract to anterograde memory  Learnt contextual location of 25 target stimuli to criterion (>

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2013/11/21/sfn2013-poster/

21/11/2013 www.pdf-archive.com

sbmt2014 poster 75%

Thalamic Stroke Long-term Memory Task Results (Context)  The thalamus is a major relay centre of the brain and central for memory processes  Focal lesions to the thalamus has been suggested to selectively impair anterograde memory  Damage to the mammillothalamic tract has been suggested to be the most consistent predictor of anterograde amnesia  Reports in the literature are all case studies and have never examined long-term anterograde memory or the whole mammillothalamic tract Recognition ‘Is this an old/new item’ Context ‘Was the item shown on the L/R’ Aims of the Study  Assess long-term contextual memory retrieval in thalamic stroke patients  Assess the integrity of the mammillothalamic tract  Identify contributions of sub-thalamic regions and the mammillothalamic tract to anterograde memory  Learnt contextual location of 25 target stimuli to criterion (>

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/03/13/sbmt2014-poster/

13/03/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

La rééducation comportementale - BAT 75%

stimuli pouvant provoquer le comportement gênant.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/01/30/la-reeducation-comportementale-bat/

30/01/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

marques etal 2009 TrueFalse 75%

A list of 336 stimuli was selected from a larger database of 838 concept–feature pairs rated on 4-point rating scale by a total of 83 participants (that otherwise did not participate in the study).

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/03/06/marques-etal-2009-truefalse/

06/03/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

PHYSIOLOGY OF NORMAL BREATHING IN THE NEWBORN - Dr. Woo 73%

When the baby is delivered in the delivery room, there are many stimuli (bright lights, noise, touch, temperature) that will initiate the first breath.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2013/12/11/physiology-of-normal-breathing-in-the-newborn-dr-woo/

11/12/2013 www.pdf-archive.com

18-documenting-4-plus-one-notes-3 73%

1.  2.  3.  4.  Identify external stimuli (requests) to the system.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/02/23/18-documenting-4-plus-one-notes-3/

23/02/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

SV2 chap 3 partie 1 68%

Prolongements très fins et ramifiés qui - se terminent dans des récepteurs sensitifs spécialisés - ou forment des synapses avec les neurones voisins dont ils reçoivent les stimuli !

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/05/02/sv2-chap-3-partie-1/

02/05/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

social wanting dysfunction autism asd 67%

Based on learning experiences, previously neutral stimuli usually acquire reward value either through the occurrence of hedonic sensations of ‘liking’ an unconditioned stimulus (UCS) when consuming it (for example, the actual taste of chocolate) or through associations of a conditioned stimulus (CS) that predicts a reward (for example, picture of a chocolate bar).

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/10/17/social-wanting-dysfunction-autism-asd/

17/10/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

PrinciplesofLearningandLearningTheory 64%

    PRINCIPLES OF LEARNING AND LEARNING THEORY                 Principles of Learning and Learning Theory  Hannah R. Hiles  University of North Carolina at Greensboro          1      PRINCIPLES OF LEARNING AND LEARNING THEORY 2  What is learning?  > Major Learning Theories: Gagné’s Hierarchy  Much of our understanding of education and the teaching process comes from Robert  Gagné, an early 20th­century experimental psychologist who was primarily interested in learning  and instruction. It was Gagné who gave us the most fundamental basis for the process of  teaching and what the instruction process looks like. Gagné’s Hierarchy of Learning presents  eight ways to learn, with each stage building on the lower levels, ensuring that the upper levels  require greater skill and ability to conquer.  From the bottom up they begin with Signal Learning. As it is at the very bottom of the  hierarchy it is part of Pavlov’s “classical conditioning,” or the act of conditioning a subject to  provide a desired response in conjunction with a predetermined signal. Next comes  Stimulus­Response Learning – a more advanced version of classical conditioning. It incorporates  the use of schedules and rewards in the learning process. Chaining comes next, wherein a student  begins to learn the ability to connect prior lessons together in an organized sequence. After  Chaining comes Verbal Association. A higher­level form of Chaining, Verbal Association is the  same idea, but with those prior lessons being vocal in nature as opposed to physical. Note that  only halfway up the hierarchy, we are finally at a point where the student is at a point where they  are beginning to incorporate verbal skills – the magnitude of Gagné’s hierarchy and just how  “basic” his most fundamental lessons are cannot be overstated.  Discrimination Learning, Concept Learning, and Rule Learning are next and are very  linked together. Discrimination Learning is the process of a student being able to form  appropriate responses in an organized and precise way. Concept Learning follows this by      PRINCIPLES OF LEARNING AND LEARNING THEORY 3  requiring that the student makes those same responses but now with the addition of  categorization – that they respond the same way to the same stimuli, regardless of order or  organization. Rule Learning eventually comes in, the second to last piece of Gagné’s hierarchy.  The most complex part of Rule Learning is that it requires the student to not only learn  relationships between situations and higher concepts but to also predict future situations and  concepts (ie, to understand social rules even if they are in a social situation that is new).  The final part of Gagné’s Hierarchy is Problem Solving. Gagné considered this the  highest level of learning. Because it requires entirely independent cognition and no external  stimuli, the student has to have mastered all previous levels in order to problem solve effectively.  In Problem Solving, the student must be able to face complicated rules and situations and not  know the answers – instead, he or she must know ways of getting to the answers (Singley 1989).  Gagné saw that by working their way up through the levels, students could eventually have  mastery of the task they were studying. This method also allowed for students to move at a pace  that worked for their own abilities, as well as letting them stop and start again at any point and  presenting the entire learning process as a journey rather than a means to an end (Clark 2004).  > Major Learning Theories: Bloom’s Taxonomy  This learning theory comes from a 1956 report that came to be known as “Bloom’s  Taxonomy,” a form of learning through instruction that takes into account the intake of  information through Cognitive (knowledge­based learning), Affective (emotion­based), and  Psychomotor (action­based). Much of instructional design that takes guidance from Bloom looks  specifically at the Cognitive model of Bloom’s Taxonomy, and the six individual components  that Bloom organizes in a hierarchy (similar to Gagné’s own hierarchy). For Bloom, the      PRINCIPLES OF LEARNING AND LEARNING THEORY 4  hierarchy comes in the form of Remembering, Understanding, Applying, Analyzing, Evaluating,  and Creating.  It’s important when looking at Bloom’s hierarchy to see that, as with Gagné, each step  leads to the next. The student begins with remembering materials – they can recall and repeat  facts and answers from their long­term memory with ease. Once they can remember information  they can proceed to understand it – one can memorize sums and figures or dates in history  without actually understanding what they mean, but Bloom saw this second level of  Understanding as an important moment in the educational process.  Applying is the student’s use of the information they have come to understand – this will  vary depending on the information they have, but the more they use the information at hand, the  deeper their understanding of it will come. This leads directly into Analyzing, where a student  can look at the work they are doing (their “application” in the previous state of the hierarchy)  and determine cause and effect. This work of analyzing their lesson moves organically into  Evaluating – if A causes B, and B is a problem, how can the student solve B? This stage of  Evaluation is similar to Gagné’s final level of Problem Solving – it is the process of a student  looking for the work they are doing and determining where the issues are, then finding for  themselves what the solutions may be.  Finally, the student can move into Creating. Unlike Gagné, Bloom didn’t see the  educational process as stopping at Problem Solving – for him, the pinnacle of mastering a skill or  learning something new came when the student was able to then take that information and do  something unique with it. Bloom’s first edition of the Taxonomy had this final stage as  “Knowledge,” but in 2001 (two years after his death), it was updated to “Creating” or      PRINCIPLES OF LEARNING AND LEARNING THEORY 5  “Synthesizing”. This is the student’s ability to take unique and individual parts and put them  together into a larger and more unified representation of the lesson or information they have been  learning – a synthesis of their learned knowledge (Wineburg 2009).  > Major Learning Theories: Behaviorism, Cognitivism, and Constructivism  Behaviorism, Cognitivism, and Constructivism are three additional members of learning  theory that cannot be neglected. Going back to Gagné’s “signal learning” and Pavlov’s “classical  conditioning,” Behaviorism looks at the most simple behavioral changes in an organism. As  Jordan et al point out, Behaviorists are quick to defend that they don’t believe learners don’t  think, rather “they [researchers] mainly choose to ignore inaccessible mental processes and focus  on observable behaviour” (2008). Cognitivism is a step up, branching into the mental processes  of how we observe and then process our environments and what happens to us. While  Behaviorism may be the knee­jerk reactions, Cognitivism in learning relies on “developing  effective ways of building schemata and processing information” (Jordan). Finally, in  Constructivism, we see yet a further advancement in the realm of cognition. Instead of simply  processing information as in Cognitivism, Constructivism is a school which is based on the  educator taking a passive role in their pupil’s learning – instead of dishing out answers, they may  use questions to inspire their students to probe deeper into their own understanding of the  materials, and find their own answers within. Jordan et al note that while the flow between  Constructivism and Cognitivism can be difficult to differentiate, Constructivism ultimately  “focuses on what people do with information to develop knowledge” (2008).     

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/04/24/principlesoflearningandlearningtheory/

24/04/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

SeanTrott HonorsThesis 64%

When asked to report mental imagery in response to linguistic stimuli, speakers of satelliteframed languages report more mental imagery for manner (Slobin, 2005) and tend towards ”greater specification of manner” than speakers of verb-framed languages (Berman &

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/02/13/seantrott-honorsthesis/

12/02/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

resume 62%

Sept 2013—July 2014 Research Assistant in the Social Networks and Political Psychology Laboratory Designed and pilot-tested video and text stimuli for political psychology experiments studying political anxiety and disengagement.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/03/31/resume-1/

31/03/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

PID1801815 59%

It contains the platform specific parts of the model, i.e., a recorder to monitor the SUT and log its execution and a player that can send stimuli to the SUT to replay event patterns.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2011/08/13/pid1801815/

12/08/2011 www.pdf-archive.com

Review of Basic Neuroscience 55%

Thus, emotional responses are generally prolonged and outlast the stimuli that initiate them.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/01/19/review-of-basic-neuroscience/

19/01/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

Macaque study 55%

 The  present  study  did  not  include   nonsocial  control  stimuli,  which  may  be  more  engaging  for  males;

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/12/14/macaque-study/

14/12/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

#4 - Assignment for Posting 55%

Demonstrates difficulties interacting with peers and adults, has difficulty reading and understanding social cues or situations, Social Skills withdraws from or provides unusual responses in social situations, engages in play that is lacking in the imaginative qualities of social play Has difficulty communicating thoughts and needs verbally and nonverbally, has difficulty with non-verbal communication such as use Communication of gestures, pictures, eye contact, and facial expressions, uses speech that include repetitive, echolalic, or unusual language Behavior Responses to Sensory Stimuli Transitions Displays obsessions or preoccupations with specific themes or objects, likes order and may line up toys repeatedly, engages in unusual behaviors such as rocking, spinning, or hand flapping, gets extremely upset with changes in routine or schedules Reacts to sights, sounds, conversational buzz, the development of a crowd (e.g.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2013/06/05/4-assignment-for-posting/

05/06/2013 www.pdf-archive.com