Search


PDF Archive search engine
Last database update: 26 February at 17:10 - Around 75000 files indexed.


Show results per page

Results for «themselves»:


Total: 2000 results - 0.086 seconds

Report 2 10 Ways to Build Self-Esteem and Self-Confidence 100%

Ask your kids if they would like to have someone just like themselves as a friend.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2012/05/09/report-2-10-ways-to-build-self-esteem-and-self-confidence/

09/05/2012 www.pdf-archive.com

Chronical Guide VtM Pgs 61-65.indd 90%

Though other Kindred may think of the court as a council, these wrathful monsters often think of themselves as the Rakshasa Princes of the Court of Infinite Thunders and still maintain the lands that were concurred by Lanka in the dim nights of the primordial past.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2011/04/14/chronical-guide-vtm-pgs-61-65-indd/

14/04/2011 www.pdf-archive.com

Selections from the Quran 89%

 Fain  would  they  deceive  Allah  and  those  who  believe,  but  they   only  deceive  themselves,  and  realise  (it)  not!

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/07/10/selections-from-the-quran/

10/07/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

Social Center VanTran 87%

Teenagers at this age usually face problems with emotion and sometimes they cannot understand themselves, what they need and what they want.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/04/28/social-center-vantran/

28/04/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

cult papers updated 86%

"Verily, many people attribute themselves to AhlusSunnah, Ahul Hadith, and Salafiyah.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/12/12/cult-papers-updated/

12/12/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

contracerycii02 86%

BELIEF THAT ONE IS MADE “WORTHY” BY THEIR OWN  WORKS RATHER THAN THE MYSTERIES IS PELAGIANISM    Pelagius  (c.  354‐420)  was  a  heretic  from  Britain,  who  believed  that  it  was  possible  for  man  to  be  worthy  or  even  perfect  by  way  of  his  free  will,  without the necessity of grace. In most cases, Pelagius reverted from this strict  form  and  did  not  profess  it.  For  this  reason,  many  of  the  councils  called  to  condemn the false teaching, only condemn the heresy of Pelagianism, but do  not  condemn  Pelagius  himself.  But  various  councils  actually  do  condemn  Pelagius along with Pelagianism. Various Protestants have tried to disparage  the  Orthodox  Faith  by  calling  its  beliefs  Pelagian  or  Semipelagian.  But  the  Orthodox  Faith  is  neither  the  one,  nor  the  other,  but  is  entirely  free  from  Pelagianism.  The  Orthodox  Faith  is  also  free  from  the  opposite  extreme,  namely, Manicheanism, which believes that the world is inherently evil from  its very creation. The Orthodox Faith is the Royal Path. It neither falls to the  right nor to the left, but remains on the straight path, that is, “the Way.” The  Orthodox  Faith does  indeed  believe  that good  works are  essential, but these  are for the purpose of gaining God’s mercy. By no means can mankind grant  himself  “worthiness”  and  “perfection”  by  way  of  his  own  works.  It  is  only  through God’s uncreated grace, light, powers and energies, that mankind can  truly be granted worthiness and perfection in Christ.    The most commonly‐available source of God’s grace within the Church  is through the Holy Mysteries, particularly the Mysteries of Baptism, Chrism,  Absolution and Communion, which are necessary for salvation. Baptism can  only be received once, for it is a reconciliation of the fallen man to the Risen  Man,  where  one  no  longer  shares  in  the  nakedness  of  Adam  but  becomes  clothed with Christ. Chrism can be repeated whenever an Orthodox Christian  lapses into schism or heresy and is being reconciled to the Church. Absolution  can also serve as a method of reconciliation from the sin of heresy or schism  as well as from any personal sin that an Orthodox Christian may commit, and  in receiving the prayer of pardon one is reconciled to the Church. For as long  as  an  Orthodox  Christian  sins,  he  must  receive  this  Mystery  repeatedly  in  order to prepare himself for the next Mystery. Communion is reconciliation to  the  Immaculate  Body  and  Precious  Blood  of  Christ,  allowing  one  to  live  in  Christ. This is the ultimate Mystery, and must be received frequently for one  to experience a life in Christ. For Orthodox Christianity is not a philosophy or  a way of thought, nor is it merely a moral code, but it is the Life of Christ in  man, and the way one can truly live in Christ is through Holy Communion.    Pelagianism in the strictest form is the belief that mankind can achieve  “worthiness” and “perfection” by way of his own free will, without the need  of  God’s  grace  or  the  Mysteries  to  be  the  source  of  that  worthiness  and  perfection. Rather than viewing good works as a method of achieving God’s  mercy,  they  view  the  good  works  as  a  method  of  achieving  self‐worth  and  self‐perfection. The most common understanding of Pelagianism refers to the  supposed “worthiness” of man by way of having a good will or good works  prior  to  receiving  the  Mystery  of  Baptism.  But  the  form  of  Pelagianism  into  which  Bp.  Kirykos  falls  in  his  first  letter  to  Fr.  Pedro,  is  in  regards  to  the  supposed  “worthiness”  of  Christians  purely  by  their  own  work  of  fasting.  Thus, in his first letter to Fr. Pedro, Bp. Kirykos does not mention the Mystery  of  Confession  (or  Absolution)  anywhere  in  the  text  as  a  means  of  receiving  worthiness,  but  attaches  the  worthiness  entirely  to  the  fasting  alone.  Again,  nowhere in the letter does he mention the Holy Communion itself as a source  of  perfection,  but  rather  entertains  the  notion  that  mankind  is  capable  of  achieving such perfection prior to even receiving communion. This is the only  way  one  can  interpret  his  letter,  especially  his  totally  unhistorical  statement  regarding the early Christians, in which he claims: “They fasted in the fine and  broader sense, that is, they were worthy to commune.”    St. Aurelius Augustinus, otherwise known as St. Augustine of Hippo  (+28 August, 430), writes: “It is not by their works, but by grace, that the doers  of the law are justified… Now [the Apostle Paul] could not mean to contradict himself  in  saying,  ‘The  doers  of  the  law  shall  be  justified  (Romans  2:13),’  as  if  their  justification came through their works, and not through grace; since he declares that a  man  is  justified  freely  by  His  grace  without  the  works  of  the  law  (Romans  3:24,28)   intending  by  the  term  ‘freely’  nothing  else  than  that  works  do  not  precede  justification.  For  in  another  passage  he  expressly  says,  ‘If  by  grace,  then  is  it  no  more of works; otherwise grace is no longer grace (Romans 11:6).’ But the statement  that ‘the doers of the law shall be justified (Romans 2:13)’ must be so understood, as  that  we  may  know  that  they  are  not  otherwise  doers  of  the  law,  unless  they  be  justified, so that justification does not subsequently accrue to them as doers of the law,  but  justification  precedes  them  as  doers  of  the  law.  For  what  else  does  the  phrase  ‘being justified’ signify than being made righteous,—by Him, of course, who justifies  the ungodly man, that he may become a godly one instead? For if we were to express a  certain  fact  by  saying,  ‘The  men  will  be  liberated,’  the  phrase  would  of  course  be  understood  as  asserting  that  the  liberation  would  accrue  to  those  who  were  men  already;  but  if  we  were  to  say,  The  men  will  be  created,  we  should  certainly  not  be  understood as asserting that the creation would happen to those who were already in  existence,  but  that  they  became  men  by  the  creation  itself.  If  in  like  manner  it  were  said, The doers of the law shall be honoured, we should only interpret the statement  correctly  if  we  supposed  that  the  honour  was  to  accrue  to  those  who  were  already  doers of the law: but when the allegation is, ‘The doers of the law shall be justified,’  what else does it mean than that the just shall be justified? for of course the doers of  the law are just persons. And thus it amounts to the same thing as if it were said,  The doers of the law shall be created,—not those who were so already, but that they  may  become  such;  in  order  that  the  Jews  who  were  hearers  of  the  law  might  hereby  understand that they wanted the grace of the Justifier, in order to be able to become its  doers also. Or else the term ‘They shall be justified’ is used in the sense of, They shall  be deemed, or reckoned as just, as it is predicated of a certain man in the Gospel, ‘But  he,  willing  to  justify  himself  (Luke  10:29),’—meaning  that  he  wished  to  be  thought  and  accounted  just.  In  like  manner,  we  attach  one  meaning  to  the  statement,  ‘God  sanctifies  His  saints,’  and  another  to  the  words,  ‘Sanctified  be  Thy  name (Matthew 6:9);’  for in the former case we suppose the words to mean that He  makes those to be saints who were not saints before, and in the latter, that the  prayer  would  have  that  which  is  always  holy  in  itself  be  also  regarded  as  holy  by  men,—in  a  word,  be  feared  with  a  hallowed  awe.”  (Augustine  of  Hippo,  Antipelagian Writings, Chapter 45)    Thus the doers of the law are justified by God’s grace and not by their  own good works. The purpose of their own good works is to obtain the mercy  of  God,  but  it  is  God’s  grace  through  the  Holy  Mysteries  that  bestows  the  worthiness  and  perfection  upon  mankind.  Blessed  Augustine  does  not  only  speak  of  this  in  regards  to  the  Mystery  of  Baptism, but  applies  it  also  to  the  Mystery of Communion. Thus he writes of both Mysteries as follows:     “Now  [the  Pelagians]  take  alarm  from  the  statement  of  the  Lord,  when  He  says,  ‘Except  a  man  be  born  again,  he  cannot  see  the  kingdom  of  God  (John  3:3);’  because in His own explanation of the passage He affirms, ‘Except a man be born of  water and of the Spirit, he cannot enter into the kingdom of God (John 3:5).’ And so  they  try to ascribe to unbaptized  infants, by the  merit  of  their innocence, the gift of  salvation  and  eternal  life,  but  at the  same  time,  owing  to  their  being  unbaptized,  to  exclude them from the kingdom of heaven. But how novel and astonishing is such  an  assumption,  as  if  there  could  possibly  be  salvation  and  eternal  life  without heirship with Christ, without the kingdom of heaven! Of course they  have  their  refuge,  whither  to  escape  and  hide  themselves,  because  the  Lord  does  not  say,  Except  a  man  be  born  of  water  and  of  the  Spirit,  he  cannot  have  life,  but—‘he  cannot  enter  into  the  kingdom  of  God.’  If  indeed  He  had  said  the  other,  there  could  have  risen  not  a  moment’s  doubt.  Well,  then,  let  us  remove  the  doubt;  let  us  now  listen to the Lord, and not to men’s notions and conjectures; let us, I say, hear what  the Lord says—not indeed concerning the sacrament of the laver, but concerning the  sacrament of His own holy table, to which none but a baptized person has a right  to approach: ‘Except ye eat my flesh and drink my blood, ye shall have no life  in you  (John  6:53).’ What do we want more? What  answer  to  this can be  adduced,  unless it be by that obstinacy which ever resists the constancy of manifest truth?” (op.  cit., Chapter 26)    Blessed  Augustine  continues  on  the  same  subject  of  how  the  early  Orthodox  Christians  of  Carthage  perceived  the  Mysteries  of  Baptism  and  Communion:  “The  Christians  of  Carthage  have  an  excellent  name  for  the  sacraments,  when  they  say  that  baptism  is  nothing  else  than  ‘salvation,’  and  the  sacrament of the body of Christ nothing else than ‘life.’ Whence, however, was  this derived, but from that primitive, as I suppose, and apostolic tradition, by which  the Churches of Christ maintain it to be an inherent principle, that without baptism  and partaking of the supper of the Lord it is impossible for any man to attain either to  the kingdom of God or to salvation and everlasting life? So much also does Scripture  testify,  according  to  the  words  which  we  already  quoted.  For  wherein  does  their  opinion, who designate baptism by the term salvation, differ from what is written: ‘He  saved us by the washing of regeneration (Titus 3:5)?’ or from Peter’s statement: ‘The  like figure whereunto even baptism doth also now save us (1 Peter 3:21)?’ And what  else do they say who call the sacrament of the Lord’s Supper ‘life,’ than that  which is written: ‘I am the living  bread which came down from heaven (John  6:51);’  and  ‘The  bread  that  I  shall  give  is  my  flesh,  for  the  life  of  the  world  (John  6:51);’  and  ‘Except  ye  eat  the  flesh  of  the  Son  of  man,  and  drink  His  blood, ye shall have no life in you (John 6:53)?’ If, therefore, as so many and such  divine  witnesses  agree,  neither  salvation  nor  eternal  life  can  be  hoped  for  by  any man without baptism and the Lord’s body and blood, it is vain to promise  these blessings to infants without them. Moreover, if it be only sins that separate man  from salvation and eternal life, there is nothing else in infants which these sacraments  can be the means of removing, but the guilt of sin,—respecting which guilty nature it  is written, that “no one is clean, not even if his life be only that of a day (Job  14:4).’ Whence also that exclamation of the Psalmist: ‘Behold, I was conceived in  iniquity; and in sins did my mother bear me (Psalm 50:5)! This is either said in  the  person of our common  humanity, or if of  himself  only David speaks,  it does  not  imply that he was born of fornication, but in lawful wedlock. We therefore ought not  to doubt that even for infants yet to be baptized was that precious blood shed, which  previous to its actual effusion was so given, and applied in the sacrament, that it was  said, ‘This is my blood, which shall be shed for many for the remission of sins  (Matthew 26:28).’  Now they who will not allow that they are under sin, deny that  there is any liberation. For what is there that men are liberated from, if they are held  to be bound by no bondage of sin? (op. cit., Chapter 34)    Now, what of Bp. Kirykos’ opinion that early Christians “fasted in the  fine  and  broader  sense,  that  is,  they  were  worthy  to  commune?”  Is  this  because  they  were  saints?  Were  all  of  the  early  Christians  who  were  frequent  communicants ascetics who fasted “in the finer and broader sense” and were  actual  saints?  Even  if  so,  does  the  Orthodox  Church  consider  the  saints  “worthy” by their act of fasting, or is their act of fasting only a plea for God’s  mercy,  while  God’s  grace  is  what  delivers  the  worthiness?  According  to  Bp.  Kirykos,  the  early  Christians,  whether they  were  saints or  not, “fasted in  the  fine  and  broader  sense,  that  is,  they  were  worthy  to  commune.”  But  is  this  a  teaching  of  Orthodoxy  or  rather  of  Pelagianism?  Is  this  what  the  saints  believed  of  themselves,  that  they  were  “worthy?”  And  if  they  didn’t  believe  they  were  worthy,  was  that  just  out  of  humility,  or  did  they  truly  consider  themselves unworthy? Blessed Augustine of Hippo, one of the champions of  his time against the heresy of Pelagianism, writes:    “In that, indeed, in the praise of the saints, they will not drive us with the zeal  of  that  publican  (Luke  18:10‐14)  to  hunger  and  thirst  after  righteousness,  but  with  the vanity of the Pharisees, as it were, to overflow with sufficiency and fulness; what  does  it  profit  them  that—in  opposition  to  the  Manicheans,  who  do  away  with  baptism—they  say  ‘that  men  are  perfectly  renewed  by  baptism,’  and  apply  the  apostle’s testimony for this,—‘who testifies that, by the washing of water, the Church  is made holy and spotless from the Gentiles (Ephesians 5:26),’—when, with a proud  and perverse meaning, they put forth their arguments in opposition to the prayers of  the Church itself. For they say this in order that the Church may be believed after holy  baptism—in which is accomplished the forgiveness of all sins—to have no further sin;  when, in opposition to them, from the rising of the sun even to its setting, in all  its members it cries to God, ‘Forgive us our debts (Matthew 6:12).’ But if they  are  interrogated  regarding  themselves  in  this  matter,  they  find  not  what  to  answer.  For if they should say that they have no sin, John answers them, that ‘they deceive  themselves, and the  truth  is not in them (1 John 1:8).’  But if they  confess their  sins, since they wish themselves to be members of Christ’s body, how will that body,  that  is,  the  Church,  be  even  in  this  time  perfectly,  as  they  think,  without  spot  or  wrinkle, if its members without falsehood confess themselves to have sins? Wherefore  in baptism all sins are forgiven, and, by that very washing of water in the word, the  Church is set forth in Christ without spot or wrinkle (Ephesians 5:27);  and unless it  were baptized, it would fruitlessly say, ‘Forgive us our debts,’ until it be brought to  glory, when there is in it absolutely no spot or wrinkle.” (op. cit., Chapter 17).    Again,  in  his  chapter  called  ‘The  Opinion  of  the  Saints  Themselves  About  Themselves,’  Blessed  Augustine  writes:  “It  is  to  be  confessed  that  ‘the  Holy Spirit, even in the old times,’ not only ‘aided good dispositions,’ which even they  allow, but that it even made them good, which they will not have. ‘That all, also, of the  prophets and apostles or saints, both evangelical and ancient, to whom God gives His  witness, were righteous, not in comparison with the wicked, but by the rule of virtue,’  is not doubtful. And this is opposed to the Manicheans, who blaspheme the patriarchs  and  prophets;  but  what  is  opposed  to  the  Pelagians  is,  that  all  of  these,  when  interrogated  concerning  themselves  while  they  lived  in  the  body,  with  one  most  accordant voice would answer, ‘If we should say that we have no sin, we deceive  ourselves, and the truth is not in us (1 John 1:8).’ ‘But in the future time,’ it is  not to be denied ‘that there will be a reward as well of good works as of evil, and that  no  one  will  be  commanded  to  do  the  commandments  there  which  here  he  has  contemned,’  but  that  a  sufficiency  of  perfect  righteousness  where  sin  cannot  be,  a  righteousness which is here hungered and thirsted after by the saints, is here hoped for 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/contracerycii02/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

Praxis Academy 86%

In doing so, it equips participants with a greater understanding of themselves as well as their futures, while maximizing their potential for success in school and in life.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/02/29/praxis-academy/

29/02/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

Praxis Academy 86%

In doing so, it equips participants with a greater understanding of themselves as well as their futures, while maximizing their potential for success in school and in life.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/03/01/praxis-academy/

01/03/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

Deferi 86%

While they are not a warlike people their society acknowledged the necessity of means to defend themselves.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/02/08/deferi-1/

08/02/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

ancestral pride zine 86%

Everyone calls themselves an ally until it is time to do some real ally shit Every single time we speak publicly, or put ourselves out there, we are always asked by other Indigenous Nations, settlers, and settlers of color:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/02/26/ancestral-pride-zine/

25/02/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

HipHipHeads Language Paper 86%

Few, however, have taken the same approaches to online Hip-Hop communities by examining how white users negotiate their position in Hip-Hop using language, the problem often being that users don’t identify themselves by race in these communities.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/05/06/hiphipheads-language-paper/

06/05/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

building-plot-north-of-4-rock-view 86%

NOTES Electrical and other appliances such as gas supply, private water supplies etc have not been tested by the agents, we would therefore strictly point out that all prospective purchasers must satisfy themselves as to their working order.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2013/09/25/building-plot-north-of-4-rock-view/

25/09/2013 www.pdf-archive.com

Chronical Guide VtM pGs 26-30.indd 84%

themselves Just beyond the Shroud separating with the the living from the dead, all running war-like water belies spiritual transition- all sect as a vehicle rivers, streams and seas are part of 28 the the Tempest (the Great Underowrld Storm).

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2011/04/14/chronical-guide-vtm-pgs-26-30-indd/

14/04/2011 www.pdf-archive.com

aer%2E20141409 83%

However, if self-deception were possible, allocators who can take more tokens from the seller (i.e., Able=8 instead of Able=2) have more incentives to convince themselves that the seller is unkind (i.e., accepts a low price for the tokens in exchange for a side payment).

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/03/03/aer-2e20141409/

03/03/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

Praxis Academy 83%

In doing so, it equips participants with a greater understanding of themselves as well as their futures, while maximizing their potential for success in school and in life.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/02/22/praxis-academy/

22/02/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

Genesys Works 2013 Annual Report 83%

But rather than writing much more about it here, I’d prefer to let our results speak for themselves, which is the theme of this year’s report.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/05/30/genesys-works-2013-annual-report/

30/05/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

GOC1935DiangelmaBeng 83%

The Second Public Communication of the Holy  Synod of the G.O.C. in 1935 Recognizes the  Patriarchates of Jerusalem, Antioch, Serbia, etc    In  the  below  Encyclical  by  the  three  GOC  hierarchs,  the  statement is  made  that the  reason why the New Calendarists are schismatic is because they separated themselves  liturgically from the Churches of Jerusalem, Antioch, Serbia, etc, who chose to remain  with the old calendar. In saying this, it means that the three hierarch still considered  the above Old Calendarist Patriarchates to be part of the Church. Far removed is this  from the false theory of Bp. Kirykos who claims that the Old Calendarist Patriarchates  all fell in 1924 even if they retained the old calendar. Bp. Kirykos refers to anything  opposing such a belief as “Old Calendarist Ecumenism.” But if this is the case, then  Bp. Kirykos himself has his consecration from the hands of Bishop Matthew, who had  no  problem  receiving  consecration  from  the  hands  of  these  three  hierarchs,  despite  their clearly open “Old Calendarist Ecumenism” exemplified in the below Encyclical  they published in May, 1935, as their official communication to the Orthodox people.    PASTORAL ENCYCLICAL  of the Most Eminent Metropolitans  of the Autocephalous Greek Orthodox Church,  Germanus of Demetrias, Chrysostom formerly  of Florina, and Chrysostom of Zacynth    .

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/goc1935diangelmabeng/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

contracerycii03 83%

ANCIENT AND CONTEMPORARY FATHERS REGARDING  SO‐CALLED “WORTHINESS” OF THE HOLY MYSTERIES    St. John Cassian (+29 February, 435) totally disagrees with the notion  of  Bp.  Kirykos  that  the  early  Christians  communed  frequently  supposedly  because  “they  fasted  in  the  fine  and  broader  sense,  that  is,  they  were  worthy  to  commune.”  Blessed  Cassian  does  not  approve  of  Christians  shunning  communion  because  they  think  of  themselves  as  unworthy,  and  supposedly  different  to  the  early  Christians.  Thus  whichever  side  one  takes  in  this  supposed dispute of Semipelagianism, be it the side of Blessed Augustine or  that of Blessed Cassian, the truth is that both of these Holy Fathers condemn  the notions held by Bp. Kirykos.    Blessed Cassian writes: “We must not avoid communion because we deem  ourselves to be sinful. We must approach it more often for the healing of the soul and  the  purification  of  the  spirit,  but  with  such  humility  and  faith  that  considering  ourselves  unworthy,  we  would  desire  even  more  the  medicine  for  our  wounds.  Otherwise  it  is  impossible  to  receive  communion  once  a  year,  as  certain  people  do,  considering the sanctification of heavenly Mysteries as available only to saints. It is  better to think that by giving us grace, the sacrament makes us pure and holy.  Such people [who commune rarely] manifest more pride than humility, for when  they receive, they think of themselves as worthy. It is much better if, in humility  of  heart,  knowing  that  we  are  never  worthy  of  the  Holy  Mysteries  we  would  receive  them  every  Sunday  for  the  healing  of  our  diseases,  rather  than,  blinded  by  pride, think that after one year we become worthy of receiving them.” (John  Cassian, Conference 23, Chapter 21)    Now, as for those who may think the above notion  is only applicable  for the Christians living at the time of St. John Cassian (5th century), and that  the  people  at  that  time  were  justified  in  confessing  their  sins  frequently  and  also communing frequently, throughout the year, while that supposedly this  does not apply to contemporary Orthodox Christians, such a notion does not  hold  any  validity,  because  contemporary  Holy  Fathers,  among  them  the  Hesychastic  Fathers  and  Kollyvades  Fathers,  have  taught  exactly  the  same  thing  as  we  have  read  above  in  the  writings  of  Blessed  Cassian.  Thus  St.  Gregory  Palamas,  St.  Symeon  the  New  Theologian,  St.  Macarius  Notaras  of  Corinth,  St.  Nicodemus  of  Athos,  St.  Arsenius  of  Paros,  St.  Pachomius  of  Chios, St. Nectarius of Aegina, St. Matthew of Bresthena, St. Moses of Athikia,  and so many other contemporary Orthodox Saints agree with the positions of  the  Blessed  Cassian.  The  various  quotes  from  these  Holy  Fathers  are  to  be  provided in another study regarding the letter of Bp. Kirykos to Fr. Pedro. In  any  case,  not  only  contemporary  Greek  Fathers,  but  even  contemporary  Syrian, Russian, Bulgarian, Serbian and Romanian Fathers concur.     St.  Arsenius  the  Russian  of  Stavronikita  (+24  March,  1846),  for  example, writes: “One can sometimes hear people say that they avoid approaching  the Holy Mysteries because they consider themselves unworthy. But who is worthy  of it? No one on earth is worthy of it, but whoever confesses his sins with heartfelt  contrition  and  approaches  the  Chalice  of  Christ  with  consciousness  of  his  unworthiness  the  Lord  will  not  reject,  in  accordance  with  His  words,  Him  that  cometh to Me I shall in no wise cast out (John 6:37).” (Athonite Monastery of St.  Panteleimon, Athonite Leaflets, No. 105, published in 1905)    St. John Chrysostom (+14 September, 407), Archbishop of the Imperial  City  of  Constantinople  New  Rome,  speaks  very  much  against  the  idea  of  making fasting and communing a mere custom. He instead insists on making  true repentance of tears and communion with God a daily ritual. For no one  passes a single day without sinning at least in thought if not also in word and  deed. Likewise, no one can live a true life in Christ without daily repentance  and  frequent  Communion.  But  in  fact,  the  greatest  method  to  abstain  from  sins  is  by  the  fear  of  communing  unworthily.  Thus,  through  frequent  Communion one is guided towards abstinence from sins. Of course, the grace  of the Mysteries themselves are essential in this process of cleansing the brain,  heart and bowel of the body, as well as cleansing the mind, spirit and word of  the soul. But the fear of hellfire as experienced in the partaking of communion  unworthily is most definitely a means of preventing sins.     But  if  one  thinks  that  fasting  for  seven  days  without  meat,  five  days  without  dairy,  three  days  without  oil,  and  one  day  without  anything  but  xerophagy,  is  a  means  to  make  one  “worthy”  of  Communion,  whereas  the  communicant  then  returns  to  his  life  of  sin  until  the  next  year  when  he  decides  to  commune  again,  then  not  only  was  this  one  week  of  fasting  worthless, not only would 40 days of lent be unprofitable, but even an entire  lifetime  of  fasting  will  be  useless.  For  such  a  person  makes  fasting  and  Communion a mere custom, rather than a way of Life in Christ.    Blessed  Chrysostom  writes:  “But  since  I  have  mentioned  this  sacrifice,  I  wish to say a little in reference to you who have been initiated; little in quantity, but  possessing great force and profit, for it is not our own, but the words of Divine Spirit.  What then is it? Many partake of this sacrifice once in the whole year; others twice;  others  many  times.  Our  word  then  is  to  all;  not  to  those  only  who  are  here,  but  to  those also who are settled in the desert. For they partake once in the year, and often  indeed  at  intervals  of  two  years.  What  then?  Which  shall  we  approve?  Those  [who  receive] once [in the year]? Those who [receive] many times? Those who [receive] few  times?  Neither  those  [who  receive]  once,  nor  those  [who  receive]  often,  nor  those  [who  receive]  seldom,  but  those  [who  come]  with  a  pure  conscience,  from  a  pure  heart,  with  an  irreproachable  life.  Let  such  draw  near  continually;  but  those  who  are  not  such,  not  even  once.  Why,  you  will  ask?  Because  they  receive  to  themselves  judgment,  yea  and  condemnation,  and  punishment, and vengeance. And do not wonder. For as food, nourishing by nature, if  received  by  a  person  without  appetite,  ruins  and  corrupts  all  [the  system],  and  becomes an occasion of disease, so surely is it also with respect to the awful mysteries.  Do  you  feast  at  a  spiritual  table,  a  royal  table,  and  again  pollute  your  mouth  with  mire?  Do  you  anoint  yourself  with  sweet  ointment,  and  again  fill  yourself  with  ill  savors?  Tell  me,  I  beseech  you,  when  after  a  year  you  partake  of  the  Communion, do you think that the Forty Days are sufficient for you for the  purifying of the sins of all that time? And again, when a week has passed, do  you  give  yourself  up  to  the  former  things?  Tell  me  now,  if  when  you  have  been  well for forty days after a long illness, you should again give yourself up to the food  which  caused  the  sickness,  have  you  not  lost  your  former  labor  too?  For  if  natural  things  are  changed,  much  more  those  which  depend  on  choice.  As  for  instance,  by  nature we see, and naturally we have healthy eyes; but oftentimes from a bad habit [of  body] our power of vision is injured. If then natural things are changed, much more  those of choice. Thou assignest forty days for the health of the soul, or perhaps  not  even  forty,  and  do  you  expect  to  propitiate  God?  Tell  me,  are  you  in  sport? These things I say, not as forbidding you the one and annual coming,  but as wishing you to draw near continually.” (John Chrysostom, Homily 17,  on Hebrews 10:2‐9)    The Holy Fathers also stress the importance of confession of sins as the  ultimate  prerequisite  for  Holy  Communion,  while  remaining  completely  silent  about  any  specific  fast  that  is  somehow  generally  applicable  to  all  laymen equally. It is true that the spiritual father (who hears the confession of  the  penitent  Orthodox  Christian  layman)  does  have  the  authority  to  require  his spiritual son to fulfill a fast of repentance before communion. But the local  bishop (who is not  the layman’s spiritual father but  only a  distant  observer)  most certainly does not have the authority to demand the priests to enforce a  single method of preparation common to all laymen without distinction, such  as what Bp. Kirykos does in his letter to Fr. Pedro. For man cannot be made  “worthy”  due  to  such  a  pharisaic  fast  that  is  conducted  for  mere  custom’s  sake rather than serving as a true form of repentance. Indeed it is possible for  mankind  to  become  worthy  of  Holy  Communion.  But  this  worthiness  is  derived from the grace of God which directs the soul away from sins, and it is  derived  from  the  Mysteries  themselves,  particularly  the  Mystery  of  Repentance  (also  called  Confession  or  Absolution)  and  the  Mystery  of  the  Body and Blood of Christ (also called the Eucharist or Holy Communion).    St.  Nicholas  Cabasilas  (+20  June,  1391),  Archbishop  of  Thessalonica,  writes: “The Bread which truly strengthens the heart of man will obtain this for us; it  will enkindle in us ardor for contemplation, destroying the torpor that weighs down  our  soul;  it  is  the  Bread  which  has  come  down  from  heaven  to  bring  Life;  it  is  the  Bread  that  we  must  seek  in  every  way.  We  must  be  continually  occupied  with  this  Eucharistic banquet lest we suffer famine. We must guard against allowing our soul  to grow anemic and sickly, keeping away from this food under the pretext of reverence  for the sacrament. On the contrary, after telling our sins to the priest, we must  drink of the expiating Blood.” (St. Nicholas Cabasilas, The Life in Christ).    St.  Matthew  Carpathaces  (+14  May,  1950),  Archbishop  of  Athens,  while still an Archimandrite, published a book in 1933 in which he wrote five  pages  regarding  the  Mystery  of  Holy  Communion.  In  these  five  pages  he  addresses  the  issue  of  Holy  Communion,  worthiness  and  preparation.  Nowhere  in  it  does  he  speak  of  any  particular  pre‐communion  fast.  On  the  contrary, in the rest of the book he speaks only about the fasts of Wednesday  and  Friday  throughout  the  year,  and  the  four  Lenten  seasons  of  Nativity,  Pascha,  Apostles  and  Dormition.  He  also  mentions  that  married  couples  should  avoid  marital  relations  on  Wednesdays,  Fridays,  Saturdays  and  Sundays.  Aside  from  these  fasts  and  abstaining,  he  mentions  no  such  thing  about a pre‐communion fast anywhere in the book, and the book is over 300  pages long.     In  the  section  where  he  speaks  specifically  regarding  Holy  Communion,  Blessed  Matthew  speaks  only  of  confession  of  sins  as  a  prerequisite  to  Holy  Communion,  and  he  mentions  the  importance  of  abstaining from sins. Nowhere does he suggest that partaking of foods on the  days  the  Orthodox  Church  permits  is  supposedly  a  sin.  For  to  claim  such  a  thing is a product of Manicheanism and is anathematized by several councils.  But  Blessed  Matthew  of  Bresthena  was  no  Manichean,  he  was  a  Genuine  Orthodox Christian, a preserver of Orthodoxy in its fullness. The fact he had  600 nuns and 200 monks flock around him during his episcopate in Greece is  proof of his spiritual heights and that he was an Orthodox Christian not only  in  thought  and  word,  but  also  in  deed.  Yet  Bp.  Kirykos,  who  in  his  thirty  years  as  a  pastor  has  not  managed  to  produce  a  single  spiritual  offspring,  dares to claim that Blessed Matthew of Bresthena is the source of his corrupt  and heretical views. But nothing could be further from the truth.     In  Blessed  Matthew’s  written  works,  which  are  manifold  and  well‐ preserved,  nowhere  does  he  suggest  that  clergy  can  simply  follow  the  common  fasting  rules  of  the  Orthodox  Church  and  commune  several  times  per week, while if laymen follow the same Orthodox rules of fasting just as do  the priests, they are supposedly not free to commune but must undergo some  kind  of  extra  fast.  Nowhere  does  he  demand  this  fast  that  is  not  as  a  punishment  for  laymen’s  sins,  but  is  implemented  merely  because  they  are  laymen, since this fast is being demanded irrespective of the outcome of their  confession to the priest. Yet despite all of this, Bp. Kirykos arbitrarily uses the  name  of  Bishop  Matthew  as  supposedly  agreeing  with  his  positions.  The  following  quote  from  the  works  of  Blessed  Matthew  will  shatter  Kirykos’s  notion that “fasting in the finer and broader sense” can make a Christian “worthy  to  commune,”  without  mentioning  the  Holy  Mysteries  of  Confession  and  Communion themselves as the source of that worthiness.     The following quote will shatter Bp. Kirykos’ attempt to misrepresent  the  positions  of  Blessed  Matthew,  which  is  something  that  Bp.  Kirykos  is  guilty of doing for the past 30 years, tarnishing the name of Blessed Matthew,  and  causing  division  and  self‐destruction  within  the  Genuine  Orthodox  Church of Greece, while at the same time boasting of somehow being Bishop  Matthew’s  only  real  follower.  It  is  time  for  Bp.  Kirykos’  three‐decades‐long  façade  to  be  shattered.  This  shattering  shall  not  only  apply  to  the  façade  regarding the pharisaic‐style fast, but even the façade regarding the post‐1976  ecclesiology  held  by  Bp.  Kirykos  and  his  associate,  Mr.  Gkoutzidis—an  ecclesiology  which  is  found  nowhere  in  the  encyclicals  of  the  Genuine  Orthodox  Church  from  1935  until  the  1970s.  That  was  the  time  that  Mr.  Gkoutzidis  and  the  then  layman  Mr.  Kontogiannis  (now  Bp.  Kirykos)  began  controlling the Matthewite Synod. On the contrary, many historic encyclicals  of  the  Genuine  Orthodox  Church  contradict  this  post‐1976  Gkoutzidian‐ Kontogiannian  ecclesiology,  for  which  reason  the  duo  has  kept  these  documents hidden in the Synodal archives for three decades. But let us begin  the  shattering  of  the  façade  with  the  position  of  Blessed  Matthew  regarding  frequent  Communion.  For  God  has  willed  that  this  be  the  first  article  by  Bishop Matthew to be translated into English that is not of an ecclesiological  nature,  but  a  work  in  regards  to  Orthopraxia,  something  rarely  spoken  and  seldom found in the endlessly repetitive periodicals of the Kirykite faction.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/contracerycii03/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

Chronical Guide VtM PGs 76-80.indd 82%

Though they may consider themselves to be the most refined Kindred in the world, the Wan-Kuei (the Ten-Thousand Demons), by western standards, are not so much a Bloodline as they are a bunch of Thin-Blooded rabble, unable to make Blood Bonds and, most shockingly, unable to Embrace.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2011/04/14/chronical-guide-vtm-pgs-76-80-indd/

14/04/2011 www.pdf-archive.com

Graded1 81%

Moral values of the traditional past compared to the contemporary, and the push of expansion through the Americas, had a severe affect on Native Americans because of how Natives defined themselves through a strong connection to the land.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/04/28/graded1/

28/04/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

GRADED3 81%

Tribal sovereignty refers to tribes' right to govern themselves, define their own membership, manage tribal property, and regulate tribal business and domestic relations;

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/04/28/graded3/

28/04/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

GeekyBugle09 81%

No, not rebirths, retcons, or reboots (or perpetual event comics) — no, the problem with comics has become a frankly toxic element of discourse that has pervaded every section of comics, from fandom, commentary to critical elements — and even the creators and publishers themselves.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/10/01/geekybugle09/

01/10/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

NEWSLETTER7:02 81%

your Child’s Intelligence Did you know it can be disrespectful to do things for your children that they can do themselves?

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2012/07/02/newsletter7-02/

02/07/2012 www.pdf-archive.com

NEWSLETTER7:2 81%

your Child’s Intelligence Did you know it can be disrespectful to do things for your children that they can do themselves?

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2012/07/03/newsletter7-2/

02/07/2012 www.pdf-archive.com

Chronical Guide VtM PGs 16-20.indd 80%

The Voivode consider themselves apart form and superior to the rest of Kindred Kind.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2011/04/14/chronical-guide-vtm-pgs-16-20-indd/

14/04/2011 www.pdf-archive.com