Search


PDF Archive search engine
Last database update: 14 May at 09:28 - Around 76000 files indexed.


Show results per page

Results for «triggers»:


Total: 600 results - 0.036 seconds

BF375M 24V 1A PSU Insts DFU3750100 rev3 (2) 96%

BF375M 24V 1A REGULATED POWER SUPPLY UNIT IMPORTANT:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/08/23/bf375m-24v-1a-psu-insts-dfu3750100-rev3-2/

23/08/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

Aurons Day 96%

This guide will teach you how to make a day/night cycle, using some basic effects and triggers, and learn how and why they are being used.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2011/12/25/aurons-day/

25/12/2011 www.pdf-archive.com

TurnCounterHowto 94%

Setting up the turn counter    Analog triggers  Analog triggers convert analog signals into digital signals using the cRIO’s FPGA. In order to  make the turn counter work, we use an analog trigger to create a digital signal when the  potentiometer “wraps around” from 0° to 360° or 360° to 0°.     Code sample (creating an analog trigger):     AnalogTrigger​  _analogTrigger ​ =​  ​ new​  ​ AnalogTrigger​ (​ channel​ );    Analog trigger outputs  The analog trigger can send outputs in a number of different modes. The two most useful to us  here are Rising Pulse and Falling Pulse. Rising Pulse sends a pulse of digital signal when the  analog signal changes from a value below the minimum voltage you’ve set (hereafter called the  “lower threshold”) to a value above the maximum voltage you’ve set (the “upper threshold”).  Falling Pulse sends a pulse when the signal changes from a value above the upper threshold to  one below the lower threshold. One of these should pulse whenever you hit the potentiometer’s  discontinuity; which one indicates the direction the wheel pod is turning.    Code sample (creating analog trigger outputs):    AnalogTriggerOutput​  _analogTriggerFalling ​ =​  ​ new​  ​ AnalogTriggerOutput​ (​ _analogTrigger​ ,  AnalogTriggerOutput​ .​ Type​ .​ kFallingPulse​ );    AnalogTriggerOutput​  _analogTriggerRising ​ =​  ​ new​  ​ AnalogTriggerOutput​ (​ _analogTrigger​ ,  AnalogTriggerOutput​ .​ Type​ .​ kRisingPulse​ );    Creating the counter  To create a turn counter, we need to count the digital pulses of the analog trigger outputs. When  one pulses, we should increment the counter; when the other pulses, we should decrement it.  Which is which depends on your setup.     Code sample (creating the turn counter):    Counter​  _turnCounter ​ =​  ​ new​  ​ Counter​ ();  _turnCounter​ .​ setUpDownCounterMode​ ();  _turnCounter​ .​ setUpSource​ (​ _analogTriggerRising​ );  _turnCounter​ .​ setDownSource​ (​ _analogTriggerFalling​ );  _turnCounter​ .​ start​ ();    The filter, setting the sample rate and threshold voltages  Although the potentiometer’s discontinuity normally looks like a straight vertical line of voltage, it  isn’t; it’s a very steep, not­quite­vertical line. Thus, when crossing it, there’s a chance that one of  the voltages sampled by the analog trigger will be on that line, which really messes things up.  Luckily, you can enable a filter on the analog trigger’s input that samples three points and  rejects the one closest to average. In this way, so long as no more than one sampled point in a  row lies on the discontinuity and the surrounding points are below / above the lower / upper  threshold voltages, the crossing will still be detected. We need to set the sample rate low  enough that no more than one point can lie on the line.     This graph shows a closeup of the potentiometer’s discontinuity. In theory, so long as the  sample rate is slower than the 520 Hz displayed, no more than one point should lie along the  line. In practice, I found a huge margin of error beneficial; I went with 50 Hz. However, set the  sample rate too low and you run into another problem: the time between samples may be so  great that the times when the signal is above the upper threshold or below the lower threshold  are missed completely. When you lower the sample rate, you need to lower your upper  threshold and raise your lower threshold; doing this too much can result in false positives from  things like signal noise. In order to ensure that the value above the upper threshold isn’t missed,  the difference between the potentiometer’s real maximum voltage and the upper threshold must  be at least equal to the time between samples (in my case, 0.02 seconds) times the maximum  rate of change of the voltage. The same must be true of the difference between the  potentiometer’s real minimum voltage and the lower threshold. I wound up using a  “real­threshold” voltage difference of 0.6V. To get false positives, the two thresholds have to be  pretty close; once again, big safety margins are your friend.    Code sample (enabling input filtering):    _analogTrigger​ .​ setFiltered​ (​ true​ );    Code sample (setting the thresholds):    double​  _sensingVoltageDifference ​ =​  ​ 0.6;  _analogTrigger​ .​ setLimitsVoltage​ (​ minVoltage ​ +​  _sensingVoltageDifference​ ,​  maxVoltage ​ ­  _sensingVoltageDifference​ );    Code sample (setting the sample rate):    int​  DEFAULT_ANALOG_MODULE ​ =​  ​ 1;  int​  ANALOG_SAMPLE_RATE ​ =​  ​ 50​ ;​  ​ //Hz  AnalogModule​  ​ module​  ​ =​  ​ (​ AnalogModule​ )​  ​ Module​ .​ getModule​ (​ ModulePresence​ .​ ModuleType​ .​ kAnalog​ ,  DEFAULT_ANALOG_MODULE​ );  module​ .​ setSampleRate​ (​ ANALOG_SAMPLE_RATE​ );    Computing the new degree measurement  The end goal of this is to create a potentiometer that reads beyond 360°. To get this reading,  simply multiply the turn count by 360° and add the wheel’s current heading.    Code sample (reading the new degree measurement):    double​  heading ​ =​  ​ (((​ voltage ​ ­​  _minVoltage​ )​  ​ *​  ​ (​ 360.0​  ​ /​  _maxVoltage​ )))​  ​ %​  ​ 360.0;  double​  degrees ​ =​  heading ​ +​  ​ (​ _turnCounter​ .​ get​ ()​  ​ *​  ​ 360.0​ );      Putting it all together  Here’s my final code. I don’t know if things need to be in this order (as opposed to the order  presented above) but it certainly works for me.         // Constants //  private​  ​ static​  ​ final​  ​ int​  ANALOG_SAMPLE_RATE ​ =​  ​ 50;  private​  ​ static​  ​ final​  ​ int​  DEFAULT_ANALOG_MODULE ​ =​  ​ 1​ ;    private​  ​ static​  ​ final​  ​ double​  _sensingVoltageDifference ​ =​  ​ 0.6;    // Global fields //  private​  ​ AnalogTrigger​  _analogTrigger;  private​  ​ Counter​  _turnCounter;  private​  ​ AnalogTriggerOutput​  _analogTriggerFalling;  private​  ​ AnalogTriggerOutput​  _analogTriggerRising;    // In potentiometer's constructor //  _analogTrigger ​ =​  ​ new​  ​ AnalogTrigger​ (​ channel​ );  _analogTrigger​ .​ setFiltered​ (​ true​ );  _analogTrigger​ .​ setLimitsVoltage​ (​ minVoltage ​ +​  _sensingVoltageDifference​ ,​  maxVoltage ​ ­  _sensingVoltageDifference​ );  _analogTriggerFalling ​ =​  ​ new​  ​ AnalogTriggerOutput​ (​ _analogTrigger​ ,  AnalogTriggerOutput​ .​ Type​ .​ kFallingPulse​ );  _analogTriggerRising ​ =​  ​ new​  ​ AnalogTriggerOutput​ (​ _analogTrigger​ ,  AnalogTriggerOutput​ .​ Type​ .​ kRisingPulse​ );    AnalogModule​  ​ module​  ​ =​  ​ (​ AnalogModule​ )​  ​ Module​ .​ getModule​ (​ ModulePresence​ .​ ModuleType​ .​ kAnalog​ ,  DEFAULT_ANALOG_MODULE​ );  module​ .​ setSampleRate​ (​ ANALOG_SAMPLE_RATE​ );      _turnCounter ​ =​  ​ new​  ​ Counter​ ();  _turnCounter​ .​ setUpDownCounterMode​ ();  _turnCounter​ .​ setUpSource​ (​ _analogTriggerRising​ );  _turnCounter​ .​ setDownSource​ (​ _analogTriggerFalling​ );  _turnCounter​ .​ start​ ();    // getDegrees() function //  double​  heading ​ =​  ​ (((​ voltage ​ ­​  _minVoltage​ )​  ​ *​  ​ (​ 360.0​  ​ /​  _maxVoltage​ )))​  ​ %​  ​ 360.0;  double​  degrees ​ =​  heading ​ +​  _offsetDegrees ​ +​  ​ (​ _turnCounter​ .​ get​ ()​  ​ *​  ​ 360.0​ );​  ​ //I have an  "offset" that allows me to compensate for potentiometers that aren't installed exactly  straight   

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/05/25/turncounterhowto/

25/05/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

Mueller 1998 90%

The absence of a feature that triggers secondary remnant movement and secondary object fronting is illustrated in (14-c).

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2011/02/27/mueller-1998/

27/02/2011 www.pdf-archive.com

Lecroy WaveRunner 62Xi.PDF 89%

Basic system validation using advanced triggers, fast viewing modes, measurement parameters, or serial decodes is simple and easy.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/02/15/lecroy-waverunner-62xi/

15/02/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

Abigail 88%

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/04/26/abigail/

25/04/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

digitalDrummer May 2016 88%

Triggers finally untethered Tired of the tangle?

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/08/03/digitaldrummer-may-2016/

02/08/2016 www.pdf-archive.com