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20100104C09C .pdf


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Community
EASTERN TIMES • MONDAY – JANUARY 4, 2010

FAINT light on
the horizon.

First light
of 2010

BUNTAL Fishing Village in the early
morning. PHOTOS: ANTONIA CHIAM

BY ANTONIA CHIAM

T

o most people, the approach
of a new year is always about
the partying and the midnight
countdown celebration on
the last night of the old year.
Serious party-goers would even party the
whole night, some drinking themselves
senseless as they welcome the dawn of the
new year.
On the other hand, there are those who
see New Year’s Eve as just another day like
any other. They perform their day-to-day
routine and call it a night at their usual
hour, unperturbed by all the hype around
them. To them, it is just the end of the
holiday season before everyone goes back
to work and school in the new year.
My colleagues and I decided to be different this year. We enjoyed our countdown gathering at another friend’s new
café with drinks and laughter, but we
remained sober for what we had planned
to do. We decided to be part of an event
that the party revellers and the routine followers missed.
It was the significant moment known as
the first light of 2010.
In plain words, the first sunrise of the
new year.
Most people who knew us well had
looked at us with utmost scepticism that
we could actually make it for our outing.
Determined to prove ourselves, we chose
to stay awake the entire night before setting out to our location, which was Buntal
Fishing Village, in the wee hours of the
morning.
At 5am, the drive to Buntal was easy
and leisurely. Our destination is a scenic
tourist attraction located somewhere
along the stretch of Kuching-Santubong
Road, some 45 km away from the city centre. Tourists and locals flock here for the
daily fresh offerings of seafood available at
affordable prices.
The village is also a popular choice for
photography enthusiasts to catch the sunrise, as it faces the eastern sky. Fishing is
still the primary livelihood of the people
here. The fishing kelongs off the shore

ABOVE: FISHING boats chugged by.

CMYK

CMYK

CMYK

RIGHT: A VIEW of the
kelongs offshore.
from the village, together with the quaint
village houses and fishing boats, provide
the perfect
silhouette to a breathtaking view of
daybreak.
The five of us arrived at the village,
feeling tired but excited at the same time.
Everything was dark and silent. The time
showed 5.30am.
It was then that I realized I was misinformed by one of my photographer
friends on the time of sunrise. It was certainly later than 5.45 am, as there was no
hint that the day was going to break any
time soon.
My colleagues and I explored the
quiet beach. The only sounds we could
hear were the tiny waves crashing on the
shores and the occasional clucking of the
village chickens. Dark clouds seemed to
be looming above us and it worried me.

THE first light of 2010.

Highlights
Mother Teresa,
Katharine Helpburn
to get US stamps ...........10
Grand past but
uncertain future for
Malaysia’s Carcosa .......12
Not wanting to get caught in any sudden
downpour and having no intention to feed
the buzzing mosquitoes around us, we
waited in the car.
As the minutes progressed, fishermen
began to appear from the nearby houses.
They made their ways to their respective fishing boats moored beside rickety
wooden jetties. There was a glimpse of
faint light on the horizon and we hurried to the nearest jetty. It was the perfect
spot as the sky started to brighten ever so
slowly.
It was 6.15am, the moment that we had
been waiting for.
However, it was not exactly a grand
sunrise of the year. The clouds were still
aplenty, and the sky took on a darkish
blue hue that made the entire sky dull and
gloomy. The sun refused to let us see it in
its full waking beauty.
Over on the other side of the beach,
photographers swarmed the place with
their expensive cameras and tripods as
they go about their attempt to catch the

elusive first light. Friendly locals waved
from the fishing boats that chugged by
and I could not help thinking that they
were probably very amused by us city
folks, so thrilled to get shots of the sunrise.
To the villagers, January 1 might be just
another normal day as they go about making ends meet.
The rain finally came in fine drizzles.
Exhaustion began to set in for us, as we
did not sleep a wink for this event. We
decided to call it a day. As we drove past
the beach on our way back, we saw the
other photography enthusiasts still obviously enjoying themselves like we did,
taking photos and sharing the joy of the
new year together.
This was the first New Year daybreak I
ever witnessed and my colleagues admitted it was the first time in their lives that
they made a deliberate effort to catch sunrise. Sharing the moment with like-minded workmates was really an invigorating
experience.
It was certainly a cool start to 2010.

ABOVE & RIGHT:
A FISHERMAN
preparing his boat
for the day.

ENTHUSIASTIC photographers on the beach.

CMYK

Afghanistan’s first
skatepark mixes
rich and poor .................15

Salad bar gets
warm welcome in
historic Harlem
16


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