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Volume 12, Issue 3

December 2014

HAZ ALERT
Semi Drivers Killed due to
Rear-End Collisions
Case #1: A 50-year-old male truck driver was
traveling after dark on an unlit highway, when he unknowingly approached a semi that had slowed to a stop due to
road construction. With only a few feet to spare, the operator attempted to brake and swerve to the right, but failed to
avoid collision on the driver’s side of his truck. The truck
driver was speaking on his cellular device at the time of the
incident, although it is unclear if he was using a Bluetooth or
other hands-free device. He died at the scene.
Case #2: A 57-year-old male truck driver was traveling during daylight hours along the interstate, when he approached
a truck traveling at 55 mph with its emergency flashers engaged. Both trucks were in the right-side lane. At the last
second, the operator braked and swerved, attempting to
avoid a collision, but struck the slower vehicle. The entire
driver’s side of the semi truck was completely sheered off.
Despite the fact that the driver was wearing a seatbelt, he
was ejected and killed.

What steps can be made to prevent such incidents?


Motor carriers should consistently train their drivers on the importance of speed and space
management.



Maintain awareness of distracted drivers sharing the road.



Reduce distractions. Limit hands-free cell phone use to emergencies only.



Perform a thorough pre-trip and post-trip inspection to ensure your brakes, turn signals
and headlights are in good working order.



Buckle up! Safety restraint use can save your life.

HOW YOU CAN PREVENT
REAR-END COLLISIONS
 Carriers should consistently train their drivers on the importance of speed and space management. Safety train-

ing being provided by management plays an integral role in the reduction of rear-end collisions as well as many
other injuries. Trainings should focus on factors that influence the minimum amount of space needed, such as
weather conditions, speed, total weight of the truck, and traffic.
 Maintain awareness of distracted drivers sharing the road. The road is a more dangerous place to drive now

than it ever has been. One contributing factor is the distracted driving habits of other people that share the
road. Many people are unaware of the required stopping distance of a fully loaded semi-truck and may pull
directly out in front of you or swerve into your path. Maintain awareness of other vehicles at all times when
they are in your vicinity so that you will have proper time to react to their movements.
 Reduce distractions. Limit hands-free cell phone use to emergencies only . As of January 2012, the Federal Mo-

tor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) released rulings that ban both texting and using a handheld cellphone device while driving a commercial truck. Research has shown that the odds of being in a crash are 23.2
times higher for commercial motor vehicle (CMV) operators who text while driving. 1
 Perform a thorough pre-trip and post-trip inspection to ensure your brakes, turn indicators and headlights are

in good working order. The FMCSA mandates that every commercial driver must complete a pre-trip inspection
before the beginning of each work day to ensure good working order of brakes, turn signals, and headlights.2
 Buckle up! If all else fails, restraint use can save your life. The FMCSA requires that a seatbelt is used in any

CMV that has one installed in the driver’s seat.3 Wearing a seatbelt should be non-negotiable when occupying
a CMV. Research has shown that in a semi truck collision, the odds of being injured are 2.25 times higher for
both semi truck drivers and sleeper berth occupants who do not wear occupant safety restraints compared to
those who do.4
References:
1

Hickman, JS., Hanowski, R. (2012) An assessment of commercial motor vehicle driver distraction using naturalistic driving
data. Traffic Injury Prevention, 13(6).
2
“Driver Inspection”, 49 C.F.R. § 396.13 (2011). Web.
3
“Use of Seat Belts”, C.F.R. § 392.16 (2011). Web.
4
Bunn, T., Slavova, S., & Robertson, M. (2013). Motor vehicle injuries among semi truck drivers and sleeper berth passengers. Journal of Safety Research, (44), 51–55.
Please take our survey regarding this report: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/JXJPGZV

Scan the QR code to the left with your smartphone for online access to this
report and others, or visit us at www.mc.uky.edu/kiprc/projects/KOSHS


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