TeatimeGB .pdf

File information


Original filename: TeatimeGB.pdf
Title: Microsoft Word - TEATIME AROUND THE WORLD - GREAT BRITAIN FINAL.docx

This PDF 1.3 document has been generated by Word / Mac OS X 10.10.3 Quartz PDFContext, and has been sent on pdf-archive.com on 07/05/2015 at 08:15, from IP address 50.131.x.x. The current document download page has been viewed 795 times.
File size: 508 KB (2 pages).
Privacy: public file


Download original PDF file


TeatimeGB.pdf (PDF, 508 KB)


Share on social networks



Link to this file download page



Document preview


 

 

 
On  The  Menu:  Rose  Earl  Grey  +  Homemade  English  Scones  

 

 

“If the day is a sentence, tea for me is the punctuation.” – Andy
Callaghan  
 
-­‐

-­‐

-­‐

For  a  country  that  is  so  popularly  associated  with  tea  and  teatime,  England  
was  actually  the  last  European  country  to  use  maritime  trade  routes  in  
search  of  tea.    
 
Tea,  imported  from  China,  first  came  to  Britain  after  it  was  introduced  by  the  
Princess  Catherine  of  Braganza,  who  cherished  tea  as  a  part  of  childhood  
growing  up  in  Portugal.  She  was  the  Queen  of  Charles  II  and  introduced  tea  
and  tea  drinking  to  the  royal  court  in  the  17th  Century.  
 
It  was  the  Seventh  Duchess  of  Bedford  who  began  the  now-­‐popular  tradition  
of  teatime  in  England  in  1840.  In  the  late  afternoon,  she  began  taking  tea  in  
her  boudoir  to  stave  off  that  “sinking  feeling”  that  came  with  too  much  time  
passing  between  lunch  and  dinner.  She  invited  friends  to  join  her  for  tidbits  
and  tea  when  she  was  in  the  country  and  then  London.  Other  upper-­‐class  
hostesses  caught  on  to  the  trend  and  teatime  was  born  as  a  practical  and  
social  time  for  the  wealthy.    From  here,  the  English  enjoy  two  teatimes:  Low  
and  High  Teas,  named  for  the  heights  of  the  tables  at  which  they  are  served.  
Low  Tea,  the  creation  of  the  Seventh  Duchess,  is  served  in  the  mid-­‐afternoon  
with  dainty  treats  (mince  meats,  fruit  pies,  cookies,  and  scones  served  with  

 

http://www.myteadrop.com

 

 

-­‐

 
-­‐

Devonshire  cream)  and  a  dose  of  gossip  as  people  connected  for  a  light  
respite.  High  Tea  was  the  invention  of  the  working  class  and  was  served  at  
the  dinner  table.    Consisting  of  a  hearty  meal  of  meats  and  other  savory  fare,  
this  Victorian  teatime  tradition  originated  in  response  to  the  Industrial  
Revolution  when  working-­‐class  families  would  come  home  famished  from  a  
long  day.    Teatime  today  has  truly  spread  across  social  classes  and  is  
currently  enjoyed  by  all  in  England  today!  
 
From  the  16th  to  the  19th  Centuries  in  England,  over  200  tea  gardens  sprung  
up  in  London  and  were  popular  they  became  socially  acceptable  places  
where  young  men  and  women  could  socialize  over  an  outdoor  cup  of  tea.  
Primarily  frequented  by  the  working  class  in  the  second-­‐half  of  the  Victorian  
Era,  they  were  located  in  suburban  areas  around  the  city.  Even  the  most  
modest  tea  gardens  situated  at  inns  and  pubs  were  attractive  with  their  
offerings  of  tea,  ale,  and  cake,  a  bowling  green,  play  tables,  or  even  ponds.  Tea  
gardens  contained  beautiful  outdoor  attractions  like  Chinese  pavilions  and  
could  host  musicals  and  other  live  performances  making  them  great  cultural  
and  social  attractions.    
British  tea  legend  states  that  in  the  18th  to  19th  centuries,  the  tradition  of  
adding  milk  to  tea  was  birthed.  English  tea  was  brewed  with  boiling  water  
and  boiling  hot  liquid  poured  into  cheaper  crockery  would  crack  and  lead  to  
disaster.  Therefore,  milk  was  added  to  cool  the  tea.  Like  the  evolution  of  
teatimes  in  England,  the  very  British  signature  of  milk  in  tea  was  a  product  of  
practicality.  

 
Popular  Teas  In  England:  
Earl  Grey  is  popularly  enjoyed  with  a  slice  of  lemon  or  milk.  
Darjeeling  is  lighter  than  black  teas  and  consists  of  nutty,  floral,  and  fruity  
palettes—these  qualities  have  made  it  a  popular  English  afternoon  tea.  
Breakfast  Teas  are  incredibly  popular  in  the  morning  and  are  crafted  from  strong  
black  teas  and  complimented  with  sugar  and  milk,  much  like  coffee.  (The  English  
and  Scottish  have  derived  their  own  similar  breakfast  blends.  English  tea  was  
traditionally  a  Chinese  congou  tea  which  then  shifted  to  a  Ceylon  and  sometimes  
Assam  following  a  Chinese  black  tea  trade  embargo.  Scottish  tea  is  considered  the  
heartiest,  attributed  to  the  fact  that  Scotland  boasted  the  softest  water,  influencing  
taste).    
 
Want  To  Learn  More?  
A Social History of Tea: Tea's Influence on Commerce, Culture & Community by Jane
Pettigrew and Bruce Richardson
The Book Of Afternoon Tea By Lesley Mackley
For  All  The  Tea  In  China:  How  England  Stole  The  World’s  Favorite  and  Changed  
History  by  Sarah  Rose  

 

http://www.myteadrop.com


Document preview TeatimeGB.pdf - page 1/2

Document preview TeatimeGB.pdf - page 2/2

Related documents


teatimegb
teatimemorocco
the crisis of western identity
teatimeindia
teatimeindia 1
teatimejapan

Link to this page


Permanent link

Use the permanent link to the download page to share your document on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, or directly with a contact by e-Mail, Messenger, Whatsapp, Line..

Short link

Use the short link to share your document on Twitter or by text message (SMS)

HTML Code

Copy the following HTML code to share your document on a Website or Blog

QR Code

QR Code link to PDF file TeatimeGB.pdf