PDF Archive

Easily share your PDF documents with your contacts, on the Web and Social Networks.

Share a file Manage my documents Convert Recover PDF Search Help Contact



TimeandLightAlienationinContemporarySpace .pdf


Original filename: TimeandLightAlienationinContemporarySpace.pdf

This PDF 1.4 document has been generated by , and has been sent on pdf-archive.com on 29/12/2015 at 21:19, from IP address 74.95.x.x. The current document download page has been viewed 389 times.
File size: 965 KB (16 pages).
Privacy: public file




Download original PDF file









Document preview


 

Time and Light: Alienation in Contemporary Space  
Traditional spaces serve to facilitate movement and commerce1, simplifying life through 
efficient design. The mall, casinos, airports, and other commodity­centres function to encourage 
a numbing alienation and propagate consumption. Alternative, non­traditional spaces undermine 
these aims, instead providing a space for self­reflection and repositioning away from the 
capitalist trajectory of space, and therefore the mechanics of the everyday through their 
manipulation of time and light. A synartetic, or nonhistorical, approach to the analysis of these 
alternative spaces provides an avenue that cannot be periodized or folded back into the more 
traditional narratives of space. 
Benjamin’s arcades and the shopping mall participate in the traditional trajectories of 
capital, commerce and space. In this traditional narrative, spaces function to serve us by 
facilitating movement and commerce through their architectural makeup. Benjamin references 
An Illustrated Guide to Paris​
 in his seminal​
 Passagenwerk:  
These arcades, a recent invention of industrial luxury, are glass­roofed, marble­paneled 
corridors extending through whole blocks of buildings, whose owners have joined 
together for such enterprises. Lining both sides of these corridors, which get their light 
from above, are the most elegant shops, so that the passage is a city, a world in miniature2 
 
These enclosed microcosms, with their monumental facades and wide array of consumer options, 
parallel the 1960s American mall in both form and purpose. Victor Gruen, a prominent 
shopping­plaza designer, believed that suburban malls could become the epicenter of suburban 

1

 Here I mean commerce as a signifier of the implicit narrative of traditional spaces. 
 Benjamin, Walter, and Rolf Tiedemann. ​
The Arcades Project​
. Cambridge, MA: Belknap, 1999. Print. 

2

 

social interactions.3 The community sphere Benjamin detected in the Arcades was perhaps fully 
realized by the American mall.4  
This traditional trajectory directs us towards spaces that facilitate commerce and 
movement. Space is treated as an engine of capital, chained to an insatiable desire for goods and 
services. Although overlooked by this narrative, there is a rich history of non­consumable spaces 
in the 20th century. These spaces resist us: they are non indexical, serving to neither facilitate 
commerce or movement. These spaces manipulate time and light in order to motivate 
self­reflection; through them we examine the positioning of our bodies in the contemporary 
environment. Unlike in the mall, within the alternative spaces we are faced with an introspective 
experience that unveils (rather than obscures) the true nature of alienation in the contemporary 
environment.  
For instance, James Turrell’s ​
A Frontal Passage ​
(Figure 1)​
 ​
transforms the passivity of 
light into an active force by endowing it with a physical presence as the singular artistic medium 
utilized in the work. This manipulation increases the awareness of one’s own body, and therefore 
one’s positioning in the space. Light becomes a marker of the existential moment in that to 
become aware of one’s body and its temporal limitations is the feeling of existentialism. The 
properties of light, when manipulated through structures, forces a reorientation that is 
symptomatic of an experience with existential questions5. This existential moment hinges on 
3

 ​
Davidson, Ronald A.. “Parks, Malls, and the Art of War”. ​
Yearbook of the Association of Pacific Coast 
Geographers​
 73 (2011): 27–51. Web... 
4
 ​
I think it is important to note here the furthest articulation of this spatial impulse: e­commerce. However, this 
conclusion of the narrative seems to function more to implode the dialogue in on itself rather than furthering it. In 
this way, e­commerce becomes the ouroboros. By shedding it’s locus, e­commerce distances itself from a discourse 
on physical structures or site and moves towards one regarding modes of consumption.  
5
 These existential questions, and the experience attached therefore, mark a new sublime differing from the historical 
sublime in form and function. The sublime is no longer an individual experience, instead it is marked by a collective 
existential experience. Furthermore, the new sublime is no longer strictly attached to “art space” or feats of god, 
instead it is extended into commodity space and the everyday.   

 

manmade structures with alienation as a key determinant of the contemporary experience. The 
self­reflexive manipulation of time and light open the body to the feeling of existentialism and 
causes a subsequent repositioning in the contemporary landscape. Turrell's work provides us a 
lens through which to examine the intersection of time, space, and light as mechanics of the new 
social existentialism. As the catalogue establishes: “​
Instead of diffusing freely from one side of 
this wall to the other, the light ends abruptly in space, as if it had density. The power of the work 
lies in this paradox, in which nothingness gains physical presence.”6  The physical presence of 
nothingness, manifested through the physicality of light, confronts us with our own finitude. In 
other words, we disappoint the desire to fill space undefined, as light can. Therefore, 
disappointing the accompanying wish for immortality. As one moves around the work, the work 
itself changes. The positioning of the body to the piece transforms it from a mere light show to 
an expansive view of the abyss. Our body’s relationship to the piece is therefore of tantamount 
importance. The experience of becoming re­aware of the limitations of our body is in fact the 
experience of existentialism. Light, space, and time function in the work to trigger a new 
awareness of our body in the space. Our awareness of our body in this space then triggers an 
awareness of our body in the contemporary environment. This repositioning is symptomatic of 
the new social existentialism.  This new understanding of the contemporary environment 
includes an acknowledgement (or a purposeful un­acknowledgment) of our own alienation from 
other bodies and space itself.  

 ​
Publication excerpt from The Museum of Modern Art, ​
MoMA Highlights​
, New York: The Museum of Modern Art, 
revised 2004, originally published 1999, p. 343 
 
 
6

 

Shopping malls and casinos are designed to encourage naive alienation; their windowless 
facades obscure natural light, and the passing of time. Naive alienation encourages an acceptance 
of our positioning and a continuation of the rhythm of neoliberalism through a shrouding of the 
potential for collectivity. If we are all individual consumers, then we are alone and must 
consume products to bridge the gap between ourselves and others. Alternatives to these 
traditional structures, such as Isamu Noguchi’s ​
California Scenario (​
Figure 2)​
, ​
use light as a 
physical force to express a revelatory alienation. Revelatory alienation functions to unveil our 
positioning, allowing for self reflection and a radical repositioning. Revelatory alienation tears 
down the constructed individualism of neoliberalism. In its place emerges a collective 
existentialism experienced through the body's relationship to space. Noguchi’s work is 
symptomatic of this type of unveiling. Nestled in between the largest mall in California, several 
office centres, and a parking lot, ​
California Scenario​
 is a dramatic pause in the monotony of the 
everyday7. Light in Noguchi’s work is as present as the sculptural elements, arguably becoming a 
sculptural object in itself. Standing in ​
California Scenario ​
feels similar to standing on a sundial­ 
one becomes aware of the passing of time as a physical presence. During the afternoon, the sun 
bouncing off the neighboring parking lot causes the space to become so bright and hot that it is 
physically overpowering for many viewers.8 The heat and light reflecting off the adjacent 
parking garages dramatically changes the environment. It is through this heat that light becomes 
a texture in the work; this heat makes it uncomfortable to be within the space and therefore 

7

 Ironically, in reading the Yelp reviews of the California Scenario it becomes clear that (when not reflected upon) 
the work often becomes an elaborate stage for the everyday. Vivian A. writes “​
My friends and I took our prom 
pictures here (...) It was an impeccable place to take pictures at; nice, quiet and may I add, very clean too! Although 
it's a quite a small space, there's a lot of different artsy backgrounds you can choose from, which made it the perfect 
photo spot!” 
8
 Yelp user Tilla L. writes “​
I came around 2 pm which was so hot that day so it could have a huge impact based on 
my experience here.” 

 

changes how one composes their body within the space. Compare this to the florescent lights of 
an office building or mall, lights within these structures pass as neutral and unremarkable. They 
work to neutralize the space, anesthetizing the aesthetic experience of existing within them and 
therefore distancing us from a real awareness of our bodies and the passing of time. Light within 
California Scenario ​
functions as the only real temporal marker. The piece does not change; the 
landscape and sculptures are constantly preserved as to appear atemporal and unchanging. Even 
in just moving across the plaza, one can observe how light is utilized as haptic and dynamic. 
Approaching the forested area of the plaza feels like approaching a mirage, the heat reflecting off 
the stone ground contrasts the lush grass and temperate shade (Figure 3). The transitioning 
between the two environments within the larger scenario shocks the body into a revelatory 
alienation. Using this experience as a key; one can then reconsider the positioning of their body 
outside ​
California Scenario ​
instead of naively accepting the conditions of their positioning in the 
world.    
Naive alienation, or acceptance, suggests an abstraction or denial of space. To follow 
Worringer’s ​
Abstraction and Empathy ​
to its conclusion would be to admit that to productively 
exist in the contemporary environment one must mentally abstract space. Completely absorbing 
the myriad of hyper­real contemporary spaces would be overwhelming to an individual. 
Worringer elaborates;  
While the tendency of empathy has as its condition a happy pantheistic relation of 
confidence between man and the phenomena of the external world, the tendency to 
abstraction is the result of a great inner conflict between man and his surroundings, and 

 

corresponds in religion to a strongly transcendental coloring of all ideas. This state we 
might call a prodigious mental fear of space.9 
 
Things outside us, Worringer implied, need to be redrawn to overcome our anxiety in their 
presence – rediscovered in collective experience and individual perception. To make an abstract 
image of the world is not to admit incompetence at depiction or mimesis but rather to embrace a 
psychological need to show the world as seen through the imperfect distortions of humanity10. 
The mall abstracts its own space, the often times circular or winding design of the mall creates 
the environment for Benjamin’s flanneur without the requisite social interactions (Figure 4). 
Take for instance the floorplan of the food court (Figure 5), the very design of the tables 
functions to avoid social interaction and encourage alienation due to a intentional distancing. The 
very setup of these food courts illustrates Worringer’s fear of space not being filled, the colorful 
banners and kiosks distract us from any existential interaction within the cavernous architecture 
of the mall. We become individual consumers within the space of the mall, there is no awareness 
of its true spatial properties behind its shroud of synthetic neutrality and therefore no awareness 
of our true identities. Due to our presence as individual consumers, there is also no call to 
collectivity or desire for a greater social consciousness. Noguchi’s ​
California Scenario ​
employs 
a new type of hyper­realness anathema to the malls construction, no longer that of a crowded 
pedestrian thoroughfare but one of simplicity and stark minimalism. Through this minimalism, 
and its ictus on light, one becomes hyper­aware of the environment and henceforth the 
positioning of the body. Leaving ​
California Scenario ​
after a period of solitary meditation is 
similar to exiting a 3d movie or sensory deprivation tank. There is no tangible ontological 
 "Abstraction and Empathy (ebook) by Wilhelm Worringer." ​
EBooks.com​
. N.p., n.d. Web. 30 Nov. 2015. 
 Ashford, Dough. ​
Empathy and Abstraction, (Excerpts)​
. Marres/Centrum Voor Contemporaine Cultuur, 0. Print. 

9

10

 

change, but one’s senses are briefly re­trained to examine the world (and by proxy one’s 
positioning within it) differently due to the physical properties of the space.  
Mark Rothko’s ​
Rothko Chapel ​
(Figures 6­7)​
, ​
designed with architects Philip Johnson, 
Howard Barnstone, and Eugene Aubry, interacts with our body in a way that is similar to 
Noguchi’s ​
California Scenario. Rothko Chapel​
 rises out of a manicured public park in a 
gentrified arts district in the heart of Houston, Texas. Its windowless, tomb­like structure mirrors 
the form of a mall, however the ​
Rothko Chapel​
 acts more as a pause in the rhythm of the 
everyday than as a continuum, or catalyst, for capitalist atrophy. The facade has no signage or 
advertisements to distract from its form. The nondescript exterior shrouds the interior’s 
transformative properties, acting more as a obstruction of the park space than as a signifier of the 
interior. ​
The Rothko Chapel​
’s very obstruction of the park­landscape is symptomatic of its 
radical presence. Public parks generally exist to provide opportunities for leisure to the public, 
however this leisure is not radical or reflective­ it services the rhythm of capitalist life. ​
The 
Rothko Chapel ​
is not in tune with this rhythm. While public parks do function as pauses, they are 
actually integral to the continuation of this capital, and therefore the hyper­real conditions of the 
contemporary world. Parks function as pauses in the same way a musician may pause to flip a 
page of sheet music, it is part of what makes the continuation of the melody possible. 
Meanwhile, ​
The Rothko Chapel ​
functions as a disruptive pause, not a structural one. This 
disruptive pause provides time to examine positioning of one’s body in the contemporary 
environment rather than functioning to service our body in the contemporary world. Instead of 
focusing on togetherness as a public park does, ​
The Rothko Chapel’s ​
facade​
 ​
suggests a 
revelatory alienation or strangeness in the positioning of our body in the world. This new 

 

positioning does not function to continue the rhythm of capitalist, everyday life, but instead 
subverts it.  
Upon entering the chapel, one is immediately faced by a physical presence of light. 
Similar to the ​
California Scenario, ​
light prompts us to become hyper­aware of the contingencies 
of the space and the positioning of our body. Benjamin notes in his ​
Passagenwerk ​
that the 
French words for time and weather are both “la temps”. This connection between time and 
weather, and therefore light, in ​
Passagenwerk ​
illustrates a key component of ​
The Rothko Chapel. 
The only light inside the structure comes from a series of skylights, creating an ambient space 
entirely reliant on the time, season, and weather. The light, in its dynamism, illuminates the 
paintings, transforming their surfaces in real time. The paintings metamorphose through dull 
browns, vibrant purples, and rich burgundies as the sun moves across the sky. This constantly 
changing environment is ambivalent to our temporal bodies; we cannot fully experience the 
piece because it is constantly changing. To see the paintings at noon is a radically different 
experience than seeing them in the early morning or late afternoon. Furthermore, returning a day 
later at the same time would be a thoroughly different experience than that of the previous day. 
The space becomes one marked by a psychic geography, rather than a chartable physical one.  
The experience of leaving the work at a specific time, and then returning a few hours 
later to find an entirely different, alien space is truly disorienting. This phenomena places our 
presence as a fixed point in the timeline of the piece as the work outlasts our presence in its 
dynamism. The comfort found in viewing “stationary” works, which also outlast us, is found in 
knowing that future generations will view the exact same work. However, this is a fallacy. The 
presumed unchangeability of art is purely illusory. How are we to know that future generations 

 

will view the same ​
Mona Lisa, ​
that the paint will not have faded past repair or that restoration 
efforts will now have transformed it past recognition? There is a certain dread accompanying the 
understanding that art will outlast our physical bodies, but even this is a feeling we can 
understand and process through a certain set of intellectual structures. The authority instilled 
within the federalist architecture of the classical art museum functions to instill the work of art 
with the properties of the unchanging, eternal masterpiece (Figure 8­9)11 . Of course, these 
properties are pure illusion. ​
The Rothko Chapel​
 reveal the “unchanging, eternal masterpiece” as a 
misconstruction. These new, nontraditional spaces engender the dynamism of light with 
psycho­geographical meaning. The non­indexical properties of The Rothko Chapel are 
understandable only as fragments. The finite effects of the infinite (in this case light) unveils the 
finitude of our own flesh. Unlike in the traditional museum setting, there is no illusion that future 
generations will view the same work as us. ​
The Rothko Chapel​
 operates to make us feel small or 
finite utterly trapped by our own corporeal bodies. Kant explains that a non­purposive nature is 
what forcefully reminds us of our finitude as well as the tragic­ that is, purposelessness and 
meaningless, the true nature of existence​
.12 
Samuel Beckett’s ​
Endgame ​
circles light and time, never quite approaching the topics 
frontally but instead letting them drape the space. He, perhaps unintentionally, depicts a 
quintessential reaction to to atemporal spaces in the act one: 
HAMM​
 ​
(angrily)​
: I'm asking you is it light? 
CLOV​
:Yes. ​
(Pause.) 

11

 It is important to note that the same phenomena occurs in contemporary institutions such as The Whitney, New 
Museum, and MoMa. The use of modernist architecture insures the position of the artwork as avant­garde, authentic, 
and atemporal.  
12
 ​
Sanderson, Matthew Walter. ​
Religious Sublimity and the Tragic View of Life in Kant, Schopenhauer and 
Nietzsche​
. Southern Illinois U Carbondale, 2007. Print. 


Related documents


timeandlightalienationincontemporaryspace
the alien agenda for planet earth
ufo videos show signs to1529
externalization of the reptilian hierarchy
your guide to the perfect1113
december taster day extravaganza


Related keywords