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Didot
Typographer poster and process package Typography 1 Francheska Guerrero

Jada Cash

o

C
nt
en
t

1783

F I R M I N

D I D O T

2 Final visible grid
3 Written paper: Complete Paper
4 Paper paragraphs: Flush Left 8 pt. cap height, 9 pt. leading
4 Paper paragraphs: Flush Left 8 pt. cap height, 11 pt. leading
5 Paper paragraphs: Flush Left 8 pt. cap height, 13 pt. leading
5 Paper paragraphs: Flush Left, 8 pt. cap height, 15 pt. leading
6 Paper paragraphs: Flush Left, 8 pt. cap height, 17 pt. leading
6 Paper paragraphs: Flush Left, 8 pt. cap height, 19 pt. leading
7 Paper paragraphs: Flush Left, 9 pt. cap height, 11 pt. leading
7 Paper paragraphs: Flush Left, 9 pt. cap height, 13 pt. leading
8 Paper paragraphs: Flush Left, 9 pt. cap height, 15 pt. leading
8 Paper paragraphs: Flush Left, 9 pt. cap height, 17 pt. leading
9 Paper paragraphs: Flush Left, 9 pt. cap height, 19 pt. leading
9 Paper paragraphs: Flush Left, 9 pt. cap height, 21 pt. leading
10 Paper paragraphs: Flush Left, 9 pt. cap height, 23 pt. leading
10 Paper paragraphs: Flush Left, 9 pt. cap height, 25 pt. leading
11 Poster design 1
12 Poster design 2
13 Poster design 3
14 Final Poster design

Final visible grid

2



Typographic characters are carefully designed shapes

look unhurried, calm, and in control. They are generally not

incorporating type design tradition (Coueignoux 240). Typo-

suited to setting extended text, as the verticality of the letter

graphic characters are depended on the rules related to visual

forms interferes with the text’s horizontal rhythm.

appearance, and are also subjected to the design ideas of a



skilled character designer (Southhall 168). The first Didot type-

rather up and down. (“Didot”). When opening just about any

faces appeared in 1781, as was at the end of a long typographic

fashion magazine a person will spot a Didone. If it’s a premi-

continuum, which to the modern eyes at least, seems relatively

um brand, then it may well be brought to them on the back of

unvaried. Between Nicolas Jenson’s seminal humanist typeface

Bodoni or Didot (“Didot”). Brodovitch had used Didot while

of 1470 and the old styles of the early eighteenth century, there

working in Paris on Cahiers d’Art in the 1920s. In his reign as

is a 250-year period marked less by innovation than by a steady

art director of Harper’s Bazaar, Didot was the black blade that

improvement in the design of letters. As the center of Euro-

cut the white space of his layouts. The font became the signa-

pean printing moved north, fifteenth century Venetian types

ture of Harper’s Bazaar as well as Brodovitch’s own signature:

gave way to sixteenth century French models, which were in

he used the font for the identity of his influential Design Labo-

turn assimilated into the Dutch and English old styles of the

ratory at the New School. In the 1950s Bodoni (and its clown-

centuries to follow. Taken together, these types describe a slow

ishly bloated progeny Bodoni Poster) was used in many other

progression away from the alphabet’s calligraphic origins stress

‘design’ contexts. The cover of a 1950 Museum of Modern Art

angles shifting from generally diagonal to horizontal, bracketed

book, designed by Jack Dunbar, prominently displays its title,

serifs beginning to suggest the graver more than the pen, and

“What Is Modern Design?” in Bodoni, as if the question it asks

by the end of the seventeenth century, printing types began to

is answered by the typeface, rendered in stark white letters on

evidence a distinct and autonomous visual vocabulary. Gone are

a black background. (Miller et al.) Flash ahead to 1992 and the

the irrelevancies of calligraphy, replaced instead by the spurs,

Didone aesthetic is powerfully resuscitated in Fabien Baron’s

beaks, serifs and terminals of modern typography, a coherent

re-design of Harper’s Bazaar. Baron commissioned Jonathan

system of parts which hinted at the critical rationalism of the

Hoefler to create a new digital Didot, a kind of super-Didot,

Age of Reason (“Didot”).

drawn in extremely large sizes that allowed the type to be set



in enormous display sizes while still retaining its razor-thin

Didot is classified as a Serif, also known for being

The letters don’t lead our eyes across the page, but

one of the most dramatic serif typeface and is often used for

lines. He applied the same spirit to his advertising and brand

magazines; often explored in fashion magazines. Didot typefaces

work with Valentino and Calvin Klein, and, more recently, his

is named after the famous French printing and type producing

art direction for a book on Balenciaga. (Miller et al.). Linotype

family. High and abrupt contrast between thick and thin strokes,
abrupt hairline serifs (thin), vertical axis, horizontal stress, and
small aperture are known characteristics that make the typeface
Didot so unique. Firmin Didot was born in a Parisian dynasty
that dominated French type founding for two centuries. His

Didot was designed by Adrian Frutiger for digital technology in
1992, Linotype Didot retains all of the features that make Didot
types superior for book work and other text use; like Bodoni,
its delicate lines are enhanced in display it uses.

family owned their own printing firm, which was called the
House of Didot. Firmin Didot created the first modern Roman

Work Cited

typeface in 1784, and he is remembered today as the namesake
of a series of Neoclassical typefaces that exquisitely captured the

“A History of Graphic Design: Chapter 54: A History of Typeface.” A History of Graphic

Modern style. He also created the typeface Ambroise, which is

Design: Chapter 54: A History of Typeface. http://guity-novin.blogspot.com/2012/03/history-

a contemporary interpretation of various typefaces belonging
to Didot’s late style, conceived circa 1830, including the original

of-type-face.html. 14 Oct. 2015.

“Hoefler & Co.” Didot Fonts. http://www.typography.com/. 14 Oct. 2015.

forms of g, y, &; and to a lesser extent, k. (“A History of Graphic Design”). The types that Didot used are characterized by

R. Southall, “Metafont in the Rockies: the Colorado Typemaking Project,” Electronic Publish-

extreme contrast in thick strokes and thin strokes, by the use of

ing, Artistic Imaging, and Digital Typography, R.D. Hersch, J. André, and H. Brown, eds.,

hairline serifs and by the vertical stress of the letters. Many fonts

LNCS 1375, Springer-Verlag, 1998, pp. 167-180

today are available based on Firmin Didot’s typefaces. These include Linotype Didot and HTF Didot. In the second half of the
19th century, it was normal to find fat Didots in several widths
in the catalogues of French type foundries, mostly alphabets of
capitals only. The narrow versions were widely used for heavy

Ph. Coueignoux, “Character Generation by Computer”, Computer Graphics and Image
Processing, vol. 16, 1981, pp. 240-269

Hoefler & Co.” Didot Fonts: History. http://www.typography.comfonts/didot/overview/. 14
Oct. 2015.

titlings in theatre posters. These same typefaces continued to be
offered by French foundries such as Deberny and Peignot until

“Eye Magazine.” Eye Magazine. http://www.eyemagazine.com/feature/article/through-thick-

the demise of the last type foundries in France at the end of the

and-think-fashion-and-type 14 Oct. 2015.

1960s. (“A History of Graphic Design”). Around 1800, the Didot
family owned the most important print shop and font foundry
in France. Pierre Didot, the printer, published a document with

“Font Designer – Firmin Didot.” Firmin Didot. http://www.linotype.com/370/firmindidot.
html. 14 Oct. 2015.

the typefaces of his brother, Firmin Didot, the typeface designer.

“Didot.” - Desktop Font: MyFonts. https://www.myfonts.com/fonts/adobe/linotype-didot/. 14

The printing company still exists under the name Firmin Didot,

Oct. 2015.

Societe Nouvelle. (Font Designer). In 1797, it was granted a patent for his developments in the field of stereotype printing. His
typefaces were used in his brother, Pierre Didot’s “Editions du
Louvre”, series. In 1812, he was made director of the Imprimerie
Impériale type foundry. Later, in 1823, one of his tragedies is
performed at the Théâtre de l’Odeon. (“Font Designer”) Didot’s
good qualities include the vertical axis coupled with strong
horizontal stress which furnishes them with the stiffness of toy
soldiers on parade. They are elegant, and like all things elegant,

Essay: Firman Didot

3

Flush Left 8 pt. cap height, 9 pt. leading

Flush Left 8 pt. cap height, 11 pt. leading

The first Didot typefaces appeared in 1781, as was at the end of a
long typographic continuum, which to the modern eyes at least,
seems relatively unvaried. Between Nicolas Jenson’s seminal
humanist typeface of 1470 and the old styles of the early eighteenth
century, there is a 250-year period marked less by innovation than
by a steady improvement in the design of letters. As the center of
European printing moved north, fifteenth century Venetian types
gave way to sixteenth century French models, which were in turn
assimilated into the Dutch and English old styles of the centuries
to follow. Taken together, these types describe a slow progression
away from the alphabet’s calligraphic origins stress angles shifting
from generally diagonal to horizontal, bracketed serifs beginning
to suggest the graver more than the pen, and by the end of the
seventeenth century, printing types began to evidence a distinct
and autonomous visual vocabulary. Gone are the irrelevancies
of calligraphy, replaced instead by the spurs, beaks, serifs and
terminals of modern typography, a coherent system of parts which
hinted at the critical rationalism of the Age of Reason (“Didot”).
Didot is classified as a Serif, also known for being one of the most
dramatic serif typeface and is often used for magazines; often
explored in fashion magazines. Didot typefaces is named after
the famous French printing and type producing family. High and
abrupt contrast between thick and thin strokes, abrupt hairline
serifs (thin), vertical axis, horizontal stress, and small aperture are
known characteristics that make the typeface Didot so unique.

The first Didot typefaces appeared in 1781, as was at the end of a
long typographic continuum, which to the modern eyes at least,
seems relatively unvaried. Between Nicolas Jenson’s seminal
humanist typeface of 1470 and the old styles of the early eighteenth
century, there is a 250-year period marked less by innovation than
by a steady improvement in the design of letters. As the center of
European printing moved north, fifteenth century Venetian types
gave way to sixteenth century French models, which were in turn
assimilated into the Dutch and English old styles of the centuries
to follow. Taken together, these types describe a slow progression
away from the alphabet’s calligraphic origins stress angles shifting
from generally diagonal to horizontal, bracketed serifs beginning
to suggest the graver more than the pen, and by the end of the
seventeenth century, printing types began to evidence a distinct
and autonomous visual vocabulary. Gone are the irrelevancies
of calligraphy, replaced instead by the spurs, beaks, serifs and
terminals of modern typography, a coherent system of parts which
hinted at the critical rationalism of the Age of Reason (“Didot”).
Didot is classified as a Serif, also known for being one of the most
dramatic serif typeface and is often used for magazines; often
explored in fashion magazines. Didot typefaces is named after
the famous French printing and type producing family. High and
abrupt contrast between thick and thin strokes, abrupt hairline
serifs (thin), vertical axis, horizontal stress, and small aperture are
known characteristics that make the typeface Didot so unique.

The letters don’t lead our eyes across the page, but rather up and
down. (“Didot”). When opening just about any fashion magazine a person will spot a Didone. If it’s a premium brand, then
it may well be brought to them on the back of Bodoni or Didot
(“Didot”). Brodovitch had used Didot while working in Paris on
Cahiers d’Art in the 1920s. In his reign as art director of Harper’s
Bazaar, Didot was the black blade that cut the white space of his
layouts. The font became the signature of Harper’s Bazaar as well
as Brodovitch’s own signature: he used the font for the identity
of his influential Design Laboratory at the New School. In the
1950s Bodoni (and its clownishly bloated progeny Bodoni Poster)
was used in many other ‘design’ contexts. The cover of a 1950 Museum of Modern Art book, designed by Jack Dunbar, prominently
displays its title, “What Is Modern Design?” in Bodoni, as if the
question it asks is answered by the typeface, rendered in stark
white letters on a black background. (Miller et al.)

Paper paragraphs

The letters don’t lead our eyes across the page, but rather up and
down. (“Didot”). When opening just about any fashion magazine a person will spot a Didone. If it’s a premium brand, then
it may well be brought to them on the back of Bodoni or Didot
(“Didot”). Brodovitch had used Didot while working in Paris on
Cahiers d’Art in the 1920s. In his reign as art director of Harper’s
Bazaar, Didot was the black blade that cut the white space of his
layouts. The font became the signature of Harper’s Bazaar as well
as Brodovitch’s own signature: he used the font for the identity
of his influential Design Laboratory at the New School. In the
1950s Bodoni (and its clownishly bloated progeny Bodoni Poster)
was used in many other ‘design’ contexts. The cover of a 1950 Museum of Modern Art book, designed by Jack Dunbar, prominently
displays its title, “What Is Modern Design?” in Bodoni, as if the
question it asks is answered by the typeface, rendered in stark
white letters on a black background. (Miller et al.)

4

Flush Left 8 pt. cap height, 13 pt. leading

Flush Left 8 pt. cap height, 15 pt. leading

The first Didot typefaces appeared in 1781, as was at the end of a

The first Didot typefaces appeared in 1781, as was at the end of a

long typographic continuum, which to the modern eyes at least,

long typographic continuum, which to the modern eyes at least,

seems relatively unvaried. Between Nicolas Jenson’s seminal

seems relatively unvaried. Between Nicolas Jenson’s seminal

humanist typeface of 1470 and the old styles of the early eighteenth

humanist typeface of 1470 and the old styles of the early eighteenth

century, there is a 250-year period marked less by innovation than
by a steady improvement in the design of letters. As the center of
European printing moved north, fifteenth century Venetian types

century, there is a 250-year period marked less by innovation than
by a steady improvement in the design of letters. As the center of

gave way to sixteenth century French models, which were in turn

European printing moved north, fifteenth century Venetian types

assimilated into the Dutch and English old styles of the centuries

gave way to sixteenth century French models, which were in turn

to follow. Taken together, these types describe a slow progression

assimilated into the Dutch and English old styles of the centuries

away from the alphabet’s calligraphic origins stress angles shifting

to follow. Taken together, these types describe a slow progression

from generally diagonal to horizontal, bracketed serifs beginning
to suggest the graver more than the pen, and by the end of the
seventeenth century, printing types began to evidence a distinct
and autonomous visual vocabulary. Gone are the irrelevancies

away from the alphabet’s calligraphic origins stress angles shifting
from generally diagonal to horizontal, bracketed serifs beginning
to suggest the graver more than the pen, and by the end of the

of calligraphy, replaced instead by the spurs, beaks, serifs and

seventeenth century, printing types began to evidence a distinct

terminals of modern typography, a coherent system of parts which

and autonomous visual vocabulary. Gone are the irrelevancies

hinted at the critical rationalism of the Age of Reason (“Didot”).

of calligraphy, replaced instead by the spurs, beaks, serifs and

Didot is classified as a Serif, also known for being one of the most

terminals of modern typography, a coherent system of parts which

dramatic serif typeface and is often used for magazines; often
explored in fashion magazines. Didot typefaces is named after
the famous French printing and type producing family. High and

hinted at the critical rationalism of the Age of Reason (“Didot”).
Didot is classified as a Serif, also known for being one of the most

abrupt contrast between thick and thin strokes, abrupt hairline

dramatic serif typeface and is often used for magazines; often

serifs (thin), vertical axis, horizontal stress, and small aperture are

explored in fashion magazines. Didot typefaces is named after

known characteristics that make the typeface Didot so unique.

the famous French printing and type producing family. High and
abrupt contrast between thick and thin strokes, abrupt hairline

The letters don’t lead our eyes across the page, but rather up and

serifs (thin), vertical axis, horizontal stress, and small aperture are

down. (“Didot”). When opening just about any fashion maga-

known characteristics that make the typeface Didot so unique.

zine a person will spot a Didone. If it’s a premium brand, then
it may well be brought to them on the back of Bodoni or Didot
(“Didot”). Brodovitch had used Didot while working in Paris on
Cahiers d’Art in the 1920s. In his reign as art director of Harper’s

The letters don’t lead our eyes across the page, but rather up and
down. (“Didot”). When opening just about any fashion maga-

Bazaar, Didot was the black blade that cut the white space of his

zine a person will spot a Didone. If it’s a premium brand, then

layouts. The font became the signature of Harper’s Bazaar as well

it may well be brought to them on the back of Bodoni or Didot

as Brodovitch’s own signature: he used the font for the identity

(“Didot”). Brodovitch had used Didot while working in Paris on

of his influential Design Laboratory at the New School. In the

Cahiers d’Art in the 1920s. In his reign as art director of Harper’s

1950s Bodoni (and its clownishly bloated progeny Bodoni Poster)
was used in many other ‘design’ contexts. The cover of a 1950 Museum of Modern Art book, designed by Jack Dunbar, prominently

Bazaar, Didot was the black blade that cut the white space of his
layouts. The font became the signature of Harper’s Bazaar as well

displays its title, “What Is Modern Design?” in Bodoni, as if the

as Brodovitch’s own signature: he used the font for the identity

question it asks is answered by the typeface, rendered in stark

of his influential Design Laboratory at the New School. In the

white letters on a black background. (Miller et al.)

1950s Bodoni (and its clownishly bloated progeny Bodoni Poster)
was used in many other ‘design’ contexts. The cover of a 1950 Museum of Modern Art book, designed by Jack Dunbar, prominently
displays its title, “What Is Modern Design?” in Bodoni, as if the
question it asks is answered by the typeface, rendered in stark
white letters on a black background. (Miller et al.)

Paper paragraphs

5

Flush Left 8 pt. cap height, 17 pt. leading

Flush Left 8 pt. cap height, 19 pt. leading

The first Didot typefaces appeared in 1781, as was at the end of a

The first Didot typefaces appeared in 1781, as was at the end of a

long typographic continuum, which to the modern eyes at least,

long typographic continuum, which to the modern eyes at least,

seems relatively unvaried. Between Nicolas Jenson’s seminal
humanist typeface of 1470 and the old styles of the early eighteenth
century, there is a 250-year period marked less by innovation than
by a steady improvement in the design of letters. As the center of
European printing moved north, fifteenth century Venetian types

seems relatively unvaried. Between Nicolas Jenson’s seminal
humanist typeface of 1470 and the old styles of the early eighteenth
century, there is a 250-year period marked less by innovation than
by a steady improvement in the design of letters. As the center of

gave way to sixteenth century French models, which were in turn

European printing moved north, fifteenth century Venetian types

assimilated into the Dutch and English old styles of the centuries

gave way to sixteenth century French models, which were in turn

to follow. Taken together, these types describe a slow progression

assimilated into the Dutch and English old styles of the centuries

away from the alphabet’s calligraphic origins stress angles shifting

to follow. Taken together, these types describe a slow progression

from generally diagonal to horizontal, bracketed serifs beginning
to suggest the graver more than the pen, and by the end of the
seventeenth century, printing types began to evidence a distinct
and autonomous visual vocabulary. Gone are the irrelevancies
of calligraphy, replaced instead by the spurs, beaks, serifs and
terminals of modern typography, a coherent system of parts which

away from the alphabet’s calligraphic origins stress angles shifting
from generally diagonal to horizontal, bracketed serifs beginning
to suggest the graver more than the pen, and by the end of the
seventeenth century, printing types began to evidence a distinct
and autonomous visual vocabulary. Gone are the irrelevancies

hinted at the critical rationalism of the Age of Reason (“Didot”).

of calligraphy, replaced instead by the spurs, beaks, serifs and

Didot is classified as a Serif, also known for being one of the most

terminals of modern typography, a coherent system of parts which

dramatic serif typeface and is often used for magazines; often

hinted at the critical rationalism of the Age of Reason (“Didot”).

explored in fashion magazines. Didot typefaces is named after

Didot is classified as a Serif, also known for being one of the most

the famous French printing and type producing family. High and
abrupt contrast between thick and thin strokes, abrupt hairline
serifs (thin), vertical axis, horizontal stress, and small aperture are
known characteristics that make the typeface Didot so unique.

dramatic serif typeface and is often used for magazines; often
explored in fashion magazines. Didot typefaces is named after
the famous French printing and type producing family. High and
abrupt contrast between thick and thin strokes, abrupt hairline

The letters don’t lead our eyes across the page, but rather up and
down. (“Didot”). When opening just about any fashion maga-

serifs (thin), vertical axis, horizontal stress, and small aperture are
known characteristics that make the typeface Didot so unique.

zine a person will spot a Didone. If it’s a premium brand, then
it may well be brought to them on the back of Bodoni or Didot
(“Didot”). Brodovitch had used Didot while working in Paris on
Cahiers d’Art in the 1920s. In his reign as art director of Harper’s
Bazaar, Didot was the black blade that cut the white space of his
layouts. The font became the signature of Harper’s Bazaar as well
as Brodovitch’s own signature: he used the font for the identity

The letters don’t lead our eyes across the page, but rather up and
down. (“Didot”). When opening just about any fashion magazine a person will spot a Didone. If it’s a premium brand, then
it may well be brought to them on the back of Bodoni or Didot
(“Didot”). Brodovitch had used Didot while working in Paris on

of his influential Design Laboratory at the New School. In the

Cahiers d’Art in the 1920s. In his reign as art director of Harper’s

1950s Bodoni (and its clownishly bloated progeny Bodoni Poster)

Bazaar, Didot was the black blade that cut the white space of his

was used in many other ‘design’ contexts. The cover of a 1950 Mu-

layouts. The font became the signature of Harper’s Bazaar as well

seum of Modern Art book, designed by Jack Dunbar, prominently

as Brodovitch’s own signature: he used the font for the identity

displays its title, “What Is Modern Design?” in Bodoni, as if the
question it asks is answered by the typeface, rendered in stark
white letters on a black background. (Miller et al.)

of his influential Design Laboratory at the New School. In the
1950s Bodoni (and its clownishly bloated progeny Bodoni Poster)
was used in many other ‘design’ contexts. The cover of a 1950 Museum of Modern Art book, designed by Jack Dunbar, prominently
displays its title, “What Is Modern Design?” in Bodoni, as if the
question it asks is answered by the typeface, rendered in stark
white letters on a black background. (Miller et al.)

Paper paragraphs

6

Flush Left 9 pt. cap height, 11 pt. leading

Flush Left 9 pt. cap height, 13 pt. leading

The first Didot typefaces appeared in 1781, as was at
the end of a long typographic continuum, which to the
modern eyes at least, seems relatively unvaried. Between
Nicolas Jenson’s seminal humanist typeface of 1470 and
the old styles of the early eighteenth century, there is a
250-year period marked less by innovation than by a steady
improvement in the design of letters. As the center of
European printing moved north, fifteenth century Venetian types gave way to sixteenth century French models,
which were in turn assimilated into the Dutch and English
old styles of the centuries to follow. Taken together, these
types describe a slow progression away from the alphabet’s
calligraphic origins stress angles shifting from generally diagonal to horizontal, bracketed serifs beginning to
suggest the graver more than the pen, and by the end of
the seventeenth century, printing types began to evidence
a distinct and autonomous visual vocabulary. Gone are the
irrelevancies of calligraphy, replaced instead by the spurs,
beaks, serifs and terminals of modern typography, a coherent system of parts which hinted at the critical rationalism
of the Age of Reason (“Didot”).Didot is classified as a
Serif, also known for being one of the most dramatic serif
typeface and is often used for magazines; often explored
in fashion magazines. Didot typefaces is named after the
famous French printing and type producing family. High
and abrupt contrast between thick and thin strokes, abrupt
hairline serifs (thin), vertical axis, horizontal stress, and
small aperture are known characteristics that make the
typeface Didot so unique.

The first Didot typefaces appeared in 1781, as was at
the end of a long typographic continuum, which to the
modern eyes at least, seems relatively unvaried. Between
Nicolas Jenson’s seminal humanist typeface of 1470 and
the old styles of the early eighteenth century, there is a
250-year period marked less by innovation than by a steady
improvement in the design of letters. As the center of
European printing moved north, fifteenth century Venetian types gave way to sixteenth century French models,
which were in turn assimilated into the Dutch and English
old styles of the centuries to follow. Taken together, these
types describe a slow progression away from the alphabet’s
calligraphic origins stress angles shifting from generally diagonal to horizontal, bracketed serifs beginning to
suggest the graver more than the pen, and by the end of
the seventeenth century, printing types began to evidence
a distinct and autonomous visual vocabulary. Gone are the
irrelevancies of calligraphy, replaced instead by the spurs,
beaks, serifs and terminals of modern typography, a coherent system of parts which hinted at the critical rationalism
of the Age of Reason (“Didot”).Didot is classified as a
Serif, also known for being one of the most dramatic serif
typeface and is often used for magazines; often explored
in fashion magazines. Didot typefaces is named after the
famous French printing and type producing family. High
and abrupt contrast between thick and thin strokes, abrupt
hairline serifs (thin), vertical axis, horizontal stress, and
small aperture are known characteristics that make the
typeface Didot so unique.

The letters don’t lead our eyes across the page, but rather
up and down. (“Didot”). When opening just about any
fashion magazine a person will spot a Didone. If it’s a
premium brand, then it may well be brought to them on
the back of Bodoni or Didot (“Didot”). Brodovitch had
used Didot while working in Paris on Cahiers d’Art in
the 1920s. In his reign as art director of Harper’s Bazaar,
Didot was the black blade that cut the white space of his
layouts. The font became the signature of Harper’s Bazaar
as well as Brodovitch’s own signature: he used the font
for the identity of his influential Design Laboratory at
the New School. In the 1950s Bodoni (and its clownishly
bloated progeny Bodoni Poster) was used in many other
‘design’ contexts. The cover of a 1950 Museum of Modern
Art book, designed by Jack Dunbar, prominently displays
its title, “What Is Modern Design?” in Bodoni, as if the
question it asks is answered by the typeface, rendered in
stark white letters on a black background. (Miller et al.)

Paper paragraphs

The letters don’t lead our eyes across the page, but rather
up and down. (“Didot”). When opening just about any
fashion magazine a person will spot a Didone. If it’s a
premium brand, then it may well be brought to them on
the back of Bodoni or Didot (“Didot”). Brodovitch had
used Didot while working in Paris on Cahiers d’Art in
the 1920s. In his reign as art director of Harper’s Bazaar,
Didot was the black blade that cut the white space of his
layouts. The font became the signature of Harper’s Bazaar
as well as Brodovitch’s own signature: he used the font
for the identity of his influential Design Laboratory at
the New School. In the 1950s Bodoni (and its clownishly
bloated progeny Bodoni Poster) was used in many other
‘design’ contexts. The cover of a 1950 Museum of Modern
Art book, designed by Jack Dunbar, prominently displays
its title, “What Is Modern Design?” in Bodoni, as if the
question it asks is answered by the typeface, rendered in
stark white letters on a black background. (Miller et al.)

7

Flush Left 9 pt. cap height, 15 pt. leading

Flush Left 9 pt. cap height, 17 pt. leading

The first Didot typefaces appeared in 1781, as was at

The first Didot typefaces appeared in 1781, as was at

the end of a long typographic continuum, which to the

the end of a long typographic continuum, which to the

modern eyes at least, seems relatively unvaried. Between

modern eyes at least, seems relatively unvaried. Between

Nicolas Jenson’s seminal humanist typeface of 1470 and
the old styles of the early eighteenth century, there is a
250-year period marked less by innovation than by a steady
improvement in the design of letters. As the center of

Nicolas Jenson’s seminal humanist typeface of 1470 and
the old styles of the early eighteenth century, there is a
250-year period marked less by innovation than by a steady

European printing moved north, fifteenth century Vene-

improvement in the design of letters. As the center of

tian types gave way to sixteenth century French models,

European printing moved north, fifteenth century Vene-

which were in turn assimilated into the Dutch and English

tian types gave way to sixteenth century French models,

old styles of the centuries to follow. Taken together, these

which were in turn assimilated into the Dutch and English

types describe a slow progression away from the alphabet’s
calligraphic origins stress angles shifting from generally diagonal to horizontal, bracketed serifs beginning to
suggest the graver more than the pen, and by the end of

old styles of the centuries to follow. Taken together, these
types describe a slow progression away from the alphabet’s
calligraphic origins stress angles shifting from general-

the seventeenth century, printing types began to evidence

ly diagonal to horizontal, bracketed serifs beginning to

a distinct and autonomous visual vocabulary. Gone are the

suggest the graver more than the pen, and by the end of

irrelevancies of calligraphy, replaced instead by the spurs,

the seventeenth century, printing types began to evidence

beaks, serifs and terminals of modern typography, a coher-

a distinct and autonomous visual vocabulary. Gone are the

ent system of parts which hinted at the critical rationalism

irrelevancies of calligraphy, replaced instead by the spurs,

of the Age of Reason (“Didot”).Didot is classified as a
Serif, also known for being one of the most dramatic serif
typeface and is often used for magazines; often explored
in fashion magazines. Didot typefaces is named after the

beaks, serifs and terminals of modern typography, a coherent system of parts which hinted at the critical rationalism
of the Age of Reason (“Didot”).Didot is classified as a

famous French printing and type producing family. High

Serif, also known for being one of the most dramatic serif

and abrupt contrast between thick and thin strokes, abrupt

typeface and is often used for magazines; often explored

hairline serifs (thin), vertical axis, horizontal stress, and

in fashion magazines. Didot typefaces is named after the

small aperture are known characteristics that make the

famous French printing and type producing family. High

typeface Didot so unique.
The letters don’t lead our eyes across the page, but rather
up and down. (“Didot”). When opening just about any
fashion magazine a person will spot a Didone. If it’s a
premium brand, then it may well be brought to them on
the back of Bodoni or Didot (“Didot”). Brodovitch had

and abrupt contrast between thick and thin strokes, abrupt
hairline serifs (thin), vertical axis, horizontal stress, and
small aperture are known characteristics that make the
typeface Didot so unique.
The letters don’t lead our eyes across the page, but rather

used Didot while working in Paris on Cahiers d’Art in

up and down. (“Didot”). When opening just about any

the 1920s. In his reign as art director of Harper’s Bazaar,

fashion magazine a person will spot a Didone. If it’s a

Didot was the black blade that cut the white space of his

premium brand, then it may well be brought to them on

layouts. The font became the signature of Harper’s Bazaar

the back of Bodoni or Didot (“Didot”). Brodovitch had

as well as Brodovitch’s own signature: he used the font

used Didot while working in Paris on Cahiers d’Art in

for the identity of his influential Design Laboratory at
the New School. In the 1950s Bodoni (and its clownishly
bloated progeny Bodoni Poster) was used in many other
‘design’ contexts. The cover of a 1950 Museum of Modern

the 1920s. In his reign as art director of Harper’s Bazaar,
Didot was the black blade that cut the white space of his
layouts. The font became the signature of Harper’s Bazaar

Art book, designed by Jack Dunbar, prominently displays

as well as Brodovitch’s own signature: he used the font

its title, “What Is Modern Design?” in Bodoni, as if the

for the identity of his influential Design Laboratory at

question it asks is answered by the typeface, rendered in

the New School. In the 1950s Bodoni (and its clownishly

stark white letters on a black background. (Miller et al.)

bloated progeny Bodoni Poster) was used in many other
‘design’ contexts. The cover of a 1950 Museum of Modern
Art book, designed by Jack Dunbar, prominently displays
its title, “What Is Modern Design?” in Bodoni, as if the
question it asks is answered by the typeface, rendered in
stark white letters on a black background. (Miller et al.)

Paper paragraphs

8


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