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CBR 02 Enlightened Feminism .pdf


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Title: CBR-02 Enlightened Feminism.pptx [Sólo lectura]
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Chernock,  A.  2006.  CulNvaNng  women:  men’s  
pursuit  of  intellectual  equality  in  the  late  
BriNsh  Enlightenment.  Journal  of  Bri,sh  Studies  
43  (3):  511-­‐531.  

HIN  4312-­‐15  Cultura  Británica,  Dr.  Jason  Kendall  Moore,  Universidad  de  Playa  Ancha,  Campus  San  Felipe,  Segundo  Semester  2013    

Eighteenth-­‐century  women  were  viewed  as  
incapable  of  reason  or  argument  due  to  their  
socializaNon.  They  were  used  to  rearing  
children  and  doing  housework,  not  to  engaging  
in  men’s  intellectual  arguments.  One  author  
referred  to  them  as  a  “poor  capNve  bird”  who  
once  freed  finds  itself  incapable  of  adapNng  to  
the  world  outside  its  cage,  for  which  reason  it  
gives  up  and  “sings  itself  to  sleep.”    

HIN  4312-­‐15  Cultura  Británica,  Dr.  Jason  Kendall  Moore,  Universidad  de  Playa  Ancha,  Campus  San  Felipe,  Segundo  Semester  2013    

Some  of  the  individuals  who  most  
passionately  defended  women’s  
rights  [and  abiliNes]  were  men,  
most  notably  Thomas  Starling  
Norgate,  a  radical  journalist,  
whose  posiNon  was  influenced  by  
that  of  many  women,  though  “he  
did  more  than  simply  parrot.”    

HIN  4312-­‐15  Cultura  Británica,  Dr.  Jason  Kendall  Moore,  Universidad  de  Playa  Ancha,  Campus  San  Felipe,  Segundo  Semester  2013    

Norgate  was  one  of  many  “nonconformist  
middle-­‐class  BriNsh  men”  who  took  it  upon  
himself  “to  assist  women  in  achieving  
intellectual  emancipaNon.”  However,  many  
others  tacitly  accepted  gender  stereotypes.  
The  originality  of  this  arNcle  lies  in  its  focus  on  
men,  as  most  studies  of  eighteenth-­‐century  
feminism  neglect  them  or  portray  all  men  as  
hosNle  or  at  best  “cauNously  supporNve.”    

HIN  4312-­‐15  Cultura  Británica,  Dr.  Jason  Kendall  Moore,  Universidad  de  Playa  Ancha,  Campus  San  Felipe,  Segundo  Semester  2013    

Men  like  Norgate  viewed  women’s  rights  as  an  
essenNal  part  of  the  universal  ideals  to  which  
the  Enlightenment  was  devoted.  Foremost  
among  their  objecNves  was  securing  equal  
educaNon  for  women,  as  consistent  with  John  
Locke’s  Essay  Concerning  Human  
Understanding,  which  held  that  educaNon  was  
the  key  to  progress  and  “skill  was  acquired  
rather  than  innate…  Difference  was  the  effect,  
not  the  cause,  of  unequal  educaNons.”    

HIN  4312-­‐15  Cultura  Británica,  Dr.  Jason  Kendall  Moore,  Universidad  de  Playa  Ancha,  Campus  San  Felipe,  Segundo  Semester  2013    

Another  writer  put  it  more  bluntly:  “ There  is  
no  sex  in  minds,  and  the  female  understanding  
is  at  least  equal  in  power  to  that  of  the  male.”  
A  Cambridge  University  scholar  referred  to  the  
widespread  view  that  women  were  incapable  
of  intellectual  endeavors  as  “a  groundless  
prejudice.”    

HIN  4312-­‐15  Cultura  Británica,  Dr.  Jason  Kendall  Moore,  Universidad  de  Playa  Ancha,  Campus  San  Felipe,  Segundo  Semester  2013    

Essayist  William  Enfield,  a  
colleague  of  Norgate,  wrote:  
“The  tree  of  knowledge,  
planted  by  the  hand  of  nature,  
in  an  open  plain,  invites  every  
passenger  to  partake  of  its  
bounty;  and  man,  instead  of  
rudely  hedging  it  round  with  
thorns,  to  deter  the  approach  
of  women,  ought  to  assist  her  
in  plucking  the  fruit  from  those  
branches  which  may  happen  to  
hang  about  her  reach.”    

HIN  4312-­‐15  Cultura  Británica,  Dr.  Jason  Kendall  Moore,  Universidad  de  Playa  Ancha,  Campus  San  Felipe,  Segundo  Semester  2013    

The  educaNonal  system  “seemed  at  every  stage  designed  to  
undermine  female  potenNal.”  Some  held  that  it  poisoned  the  
minds  of  young  women  by  encouraging  them  to  take  up  
cooking,  sewing,  dancing,  languages,  etc.,  rather  than  the  
sciences,  commerce,  and  poliNcs.    

HIN  4312-­‐15  Cultura  Británica,  Dr.  Jason  Kendall  Moore,  Universidad  de  Playa  Ancha,  Campus  San  Felipe,  Segundo  Semester  2013    

Locke  stressed  that  educaNon  was  really  a  
synonym  for  culture  or  “the  whole  range  of  
social  interacNons  throughout  one’s  life.”  That  
is  why  many  men  felt  guilty  about  the  status  of  
women.  Men  were  a  part  of  the  system  that  
disenfranchised  “the  fairer  sex”  and  therefore  
they  felt  a  special  responsibility  to  oppose  
injusNce.    

HIN  4312-­‐15  Cultura  Británica,  Dr.  Jason  Kendall  Moore,  Universidad  de  Playa  Ancha,  Campus  San  Felipe,  Segundo  Semester  2013    


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